Home Depot screw display - where can I get that awesome "screw thread board".?

I want to sort all my screws and keep them sorted. The Home Depot has a board in their fastener section, into which you can thread your screw or bolt. It tells you the number and pitch.
Are those sold anywhere? It would be so handy to keep next to the fastener storage on my workbench. Not only could I definitely sort my screws now, but every time I add one to the pile I can always put itin the right place.
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Lee Valley carries one, available in Imperial or Metric threads.
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On 2/16/2012 12:24 PM, EXT wrote:

Do you recall where you saw them in Lee Valley's catalog?
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On 2/16/2012 3:00 PM, mcp6453 wrote: ...

There's this one; don't recall whether there's also the standard threaded-hole plate type there or not...
<http://www.leevalley.com/us/hardware/page.aspx?pd800&cat=3,41306>
Oh, here are the plates...
<http://www.leevalley.com/us/hardware/page.aspx?pQ784&cat=3,41306>
--
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OR Rockler .com
part #30857 standard
part #38496 metric
I have both sets, they are neat hanging on small cable .
$15.95 per
Bill

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Bill Hall wrote:

ENCO has the "Thread Detective" which has 25 inch and metric sizes in a nice "stud" format threaded on a steel cable where each stud has a male and female end in the specified thread. I think that format has an advantage in being able to check threads in tight locations vs. the plate format. On sale at $23.95 in the last flyer I have, item PH404-0002.
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Dang, I really like that. I might have to put that on my Christmas list.
nate
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Although now that I look at it closer, the last time I had to identify a tapped hole (actually a captive nut) it was a M12 fine thread, so that still wouldn't have helped... I guess nobody makes one tool to rule them all, although that is pretty darn close. I just determined what that one was by process of elimination; I tried a 1/2" NC, 1/2" NF, and M12 standard pitch, none of them worked and it looked finer than M12 standard so I brilliantly deduced what it must be :) (I also took the part - a spare tire carrier - to the auto parts store with me just to be sure... It is sad when your FLAPS has a better selection of hardware than your local hardware store, but c'est la vie.)
nate
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(Amazon.com product link shortened)&m=A2RO2HPYYAK7JI
I have an SAE one that I bought at a Sears Hardware, unfortunately I've never seen a metric one for sale anywhere in a B&M store. That's been sitting in my Amazon shopping cart for a while now in case I need to fill out an order.
nate
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Also, if you have an engraver and a tap and die set, you could make your own from aluminum plate...
n
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Or drill and tap two sets of holes. In the second hole put the corresponding size screw. Mine is bought but it wouldnt be hard to DIY one.
Jimmie
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Yes, that'd be nice. Or buy two of the screw checkers and in the second one put in the screws. then you can check nuts as well. I've also seen products like this
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
which accomplish the same task, just in a different format.
nate
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How hard could it be to make one?
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Buy a tap and die set in whatever system you prefer and use the parts of that for ID'ing the hardware. Admit it, you could use one, right?
Joe
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On 2/16/2012 9:23 AM, Bryan Scholtes wrote:

How about dirt cheap chinese metric and SAE tap/die sets?
They also make thread gauges. LIttle metal strips with teeth you just lie against the tread. If it doesn't fit, you must acquit.
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On 2/16/2012 12:23 PM, Bryan Scholtes wrote:

Good grief, have you any idea how many tapped holes you will need? You could devote an entire garage wall to that project and still not cover the subject.
Cheap dial calipers, expensive ones also work ;) , a pocket calculator and thread charts are all you really need. May as well download tap drill size charts while you are at it.
As for the charts, Google 'ISO thread charts' , print out and place in plastic sleeves, hang where you store your hardware.
John
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Good tips! Thanks!
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