Help with a electrical wiring problem

Hi,
I need help figuring out how to wire an outdoor electrical circuit. Hopefully someone can figure this out.
I have a junction box with two 14x2 wires going into it which are each hooked up to a seperate outlet. Into the same junction box I have another 14x2 wire which feeds power into the junction box. As well I have a 14x3 wire which goes into the junction box and is hooked up to a switch box with two light switches.
What I need to figure out is how to wire the junction box and light switch box so that one light switch will turn one outlet on and the other light switch will turn the second outlet on.
An help is appreciated.
Alex
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Some (most?) outlets have a cross-plate that can be removed to isolate the two sockets from each other.
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Hi,
not sure if your answer fits the problem. The two electrical receptacles are in opposite ends of the yard. I think I understand what you are saying if I wanted each outlet in an electrical receptacle separately powered but what I have is two electrical receptacles that need to be separately powered and switched.
I should have said two separate electrical receptacles in my original post, not two outlets. Sorry.
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Ok.. I've read both your posts, and it sounds like you have all the right wires in the right places, just not hooked up.
In the j-box, you're going to feed the incoming hot lead to one of the wires in the 14/3 to the switch box (lets use black).
You are going to tie all the neutrals together except for the one going to the switch box, which will be re-identified as a hot (colored tape other than white/grey/green).
You will tie all the grounds together, as well as to the device grounds, and the box (if metallic). Do this in all boxes.
Tie the other two wires in the 14/3 (red, re-identified white) each to one of the hot leads on the two pieces of 14/2.
In the switch box, the incoming hot lead will be split to feed the line side of both switches. The other two wires (red, re-identified white) will be the switched legs, one from each switch..
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If I understand your scenario, you should be able to do this with the most simple, obvious setup with all three of the 14-3's insulated wires used. So, either: - I'm dumb and don't understand your scenario - Your not doing a great job explaining what you are trying to do - You don't see how to do the most simple, obvious switch wiring and so probably should not be doing wiring on your own.
-Kevin
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On 28 Nov 2005 11:37:32 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

12/2 into the junction box from the service panel. 12/3 to the light switches, mark the white neutral with three black stripes at each end, that carries power to the switch, the black and red carry power back from the switch, one for each toggle. There is no neutral at the switch. Back at the junction box, the red and the black feed the hot wire for their respective outlets.
Tie the nuetral from the supply line and each outlet all together. (Three whites)
Tie all four grounds together.
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Thanks for all the help.
I'll try the solutions this wknd.
Alex
Goedjn wrote:

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Someone wrote:

And then someone posted about using 12 gauge wires !!!!!!! . Trying to keep it simple; My suggestion. Assuming everything is 'normal' at circuit breaker panel etc. If otherwise stop and get someone knowledgeable to help; things can get very confusing if you are not a 'circuit person'. 1) Connect all (four) grounds together and to the metal junction box. 2) Connect the white wire of the incoming 14x2 from the supply to the two white wires to each of the outlets. Do NOT connect it to the white that goes to the switch box. 3) Connect the black/live wire of the incoming supply to the lead to the switch box that feeds electricity to both switches. You may have to do a bit of tracing or testing to determine which wire was used as this 'feed' wire. For the purpose of this explanation let's assume the white wire has been used as the 'feed/hot wire to the switches' and it should have been marked as such. OK? 4) Having done this the other two wires coming back from the switch box should have power on them only when each switch is operated on? Sometimes these are referred to as 'switched feeds'. 5) Connect one of the switched feeds to the black wire to one outlet and the red wire to the black wire to the other outlet. 6) Test everything. If in doubt get help not only for your family safety but for any future home or trade electricians who may have to work on it (safely!). BTW the OP said "Outdoor" outlets. So, in most jurisdictions these should be GFCI outlets for safety and conformity to code! Any help?
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And for completeness (and since you are going to do this despite whatever I say anyway), you should relabel the switched white wires (ie the white wires that go to and from the light switch, which will be be HOT rather than the normal NEUTRAL). On each end of this white wire, wrap a piece of colored electrical tape around the white insulation (black tape will do fine, red is fine too; just don't use green or grey). This is the way to "mark" the wire (as mentioned by Terry) so that future workers will know this is not neutral any more, but rather HOT (or switched HOT, in this case).
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They SHOULD mark the wires. Many don't.
The house I'm in right now has no marked wires, even when they used regular Romex (black & white) for 240V circuits.
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Hi,
thanks all. I followed your instructions and all went well. I know have two outdoor GFCI outlets the work.
Alex
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