Help with a/c and heating!

I went into my crawl space yesterday for something and noticed small puttles of water. To make a long sotry short. My ductwork had water dripping off it. It was the main duct from one end of the house to the other. It looked as if my condensate pump had a pinch in the hose so I fixed that but am not sure if this was the problem. Also the a/c unit line that runs from the ac unit outside to the furnace underneath the house was "sweating" even with the insulation around it. Is this normal? Will this ductwork need to be replaced or will it dry out on it's own?
Problem number 2. My house is a single story about 6 years old. The house is 50 feet long. The bedroom is on one end of the house and the living room/dinning area is on the opposite end. My furnance is under the bedrooms. They stay nice and toasty in the winter. The ductwork begins at the unit using that insulated flexable ductowrk of a large diameter and goes from one end of the house to the other. branches of smaller ductwork go off of this to individual rooms.
The problem I have is the living room/dinning room area stay cold in the winter time. I have no problems cooling it in the summer. It is a living room that opens up into a dinning room. The living room has 3 ducts in it. It is I am guessing maybe 25 feet by 20 feet. The dinning room is similar sized with probably the same duct. One of my bedrooms which is small had 2 ducts in it.
I had the guys that put it in look at it and they said it was fine. (We do not have any good contractors in our area that I am aware of).
Would I benefit from adding a few more ducts myself? What would you do in this situation? I have debated putting in a gas log but I have propane and it gets rather expensive. ANy help is appreciated!
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IF the condensate pump was not removing the water produced, and IF the condensate pump was not wired correctly where is shuts off the outdoor unit when the pan fills, then you are adding excessive humidity to the crawlspace by the condensate overflow.. Sweating lines, even with insulation are normal to a point...and your duct will dry out on its own, PROVIDED That you dont have an air leak that is allowing the condensation to form on the inside of the insulation barrier..if it is, the duct needs to be replaced.

Little thing called Manual D can help your contractor determine where he screwed up.

Not really...proper airflow, proper velocity will do the trick...Manual D....

Find someone that is familiar with manual D!!!! Once they run a proper D calc, then the system can be modified if needed, OR can be balanced correctly. No one seems to know how to size ductwork anymore...and what everyone forgets, is that the duct system IS part of the HVAC units operational system...
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How do I tell if I have an air leak like you talk about?
I live in a tiny town and the contractors around here are not very good. Can I do this calculation myself and fix this myself?
Can anyone out there help me?
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Close down the vents in the bathrooms in the winter time a bit that will force more air to other areas. Commerically it is called balancing. I do it twice a year as my cooling and heating requirements are vastly differrent.

Adding ducts is not a good plan. Try balancing first.
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I have tried closing off ducts.
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