help wiring rotary phone


My mom gave me this phone. It is a replica of an old one. She had to attach phone wires on the circuit board to make it work but can't remember how she did it..fluke really.....so Now I have my phone wires, red and green, coming from wall and don't know where to attach them to make the phone work. Can anyone help? here is a photo of the circuit board..
http://www.leehane.ca/images/Picture%20910.jpg
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Presuming you are in North America (Not the UK etc.) Try hooking up red and green to the two telephone line wires from the telephone exchange. If the phone is working you should hear dial tone. And be able to dial something. After try attaching the yellow wire to either the red or green and try to see if the phone will ring on an incoming call. The phone picture seems to indicate that it may not be a genuine 'vintage' phone? Maybe something made to look 'old'! But have no definitive information. If it is an old European phone there is some chance when dialling that its dial speed and/or interval of dial pulsing may not be suitable for a North American dial system, although most systems are pretty tolerant or will only cause a few wrong numbers! So some of these quaint phones may be suitable to only talking, not dialling. If when the ringer is hooked up make absolutely sure the 'complete' phone line is working OK. We had a case of hooking up low quality phones which disabled the telephone line of a fireman who was on call! Cheap phones added to their home phone line meant that they could dial out but not receive any calls!
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On Thu, 13 May 2010 09:47:35 -0700, terry wrote:

"It is a replica of an old one." kind of gives that away ;-)

Yes, I've been trying to find information on the exact differences for a while; I've got a 1940's UK phone that I'd like to use with the system in the US if possible one day. All strowger-based setups (or modern systems designed to emulate them) in different territories seem to be similar, but not necessarily identical.

I wired up another 1960's-vintage rotary when I was living in the UK. It had probably been 20 years since I last used one. It was amazing how much longer it took to dial numbers compared to a more modern tone-based phone!
cheers
Jules
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In typed:

IFF the Central Office will respond to rotary dialing, the it's almost sure to be able to respond to nearly any consistant-speed dialing pattern between 6 and 20 pps. It might be worth either finding out from the phone company if they will accept rotary dial. Other specs (longitudinal balance, etc) are plenty close enough or that same as ours that it should work if they'll accept rotary signaling. One thing to check though, is the Ringer Equivalence and ring voltage: UK ring voltages are higher than ours for the "must detect" level, which varies depending on loop length. So it's possible if you're a long ways from the CO wiring wise, that the phone won't be able to detect ringing. There are also frequency differences but as a rule those shouldn't bother unless the signal is very weak (less than 40Vac ring voltage on the -48V DC on the red/green pair. Green is ref, and red has the CO battery voltage on it. It's been a long time but here's a page about UK specs that's pretty much in layman's terms: http://www.epanorama.net/circuits/telephone_ringer.html
HTH,
Twayne`
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wrote:

I had a modem which tone dialed so fast, it wouldn't always get the phone to start "ringing". That's not the same thing at all, but it's the best I've got. I think that is the MTBS value and I increaded it with some modem command.

I used to think it amazing that NYC for example still does, but now I suspect it's a standard part of the IC they use for phone switching now. Once the chip is designed, it's probably 10 cents extra per phone line to accept rotary dial. Or maybe
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Look for two terminal marked L1 and L2 or similar.
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/help-wiring-rotary-phone-441662-.htm DA wrote:
Adalwolfa wrote:

Given that one end of the bell coil should connect to red ("ring") wire, try to connect the left contact in the bottom row to red wire in your phone line cord and middle contact in the bottom row to green ("tip")
Some of your wires on the photo are overlapping and because they have the same color, it's hard to tell exactly what's going where. But it's unlikely you'll burn anything if connected wrong for as long as no one calls you at the time you're hooked up. If you only mess with the three contacts in the bottom row, you should be fine either way.
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On May 13, 3:02pm, info_at_1-script_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com (DA) wrote:

Here's an idea.
Terminal 1. Any of the three. Terminal 2.Either of the two remaining. Terminal 3 The remaining wire.
Number of choices 3 x 2 x 1 = A max. of only six possible combinations? Try once; then swap any two wires concentrating on the red green pair. Continue until all six combinations have been attempted. Average chance of 'hitting' the working combination = 3.
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Where are you located, USA, UK, Aus, NZ?????
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On Thu, 13 May 2010 09:18:52 -0700 (PDT), Adalwolfa

First answer HR Bob. Why do people keep their location a secret?
Are any of the possible places labeled L1 and L2? Those would be they. If not:
Are those 7 screws the only possibilities? If so, and if you couldn't ask anyone because you were stranded on desert island, the think to do would be to go to Radio Shack and buy a bag of 10 wires with alligator clips on each end.
START: Then connect one of the wires, say the red, to one of the 7 screws, using one of the wires with alligator clips.
Then clip one of the new wires to the green wire, and touch in turn each of the remaining 6 wires. Listen for a dial tone. If you don't get one try the other combinations of two screws. There are 7*6 = 42 total, and it should take less than 5 minutes to test them all.
Even if I found a pair that worked, I think I would test the remining pairs.
Once I found a pair, I would clip the end to the screw instead of just touching it and see if I could dial the phone.
Voila! If no voila, it's conceivable the red and green are backwards. That means there were 42 possibilities you didn't check. Go back to START: and used the green wire instead of the red and do everything over again. In all of the US afaik, it no longer matters if one connects red to L1 and green to L2, or vice versa, but it used to matter everywhere, so maybe it still does.
If you want the phone to ring, call yourself and if it doesn't ring when the other phone does, post back.
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I am in Canada

Nothing is labeled unfortunately.

only those screws, I do need alligator clips, that would help.. It's hard working with open strands of wires..to keep them attached to one while trying the rest..
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/help-wiring-rotary-phone-441662-.htm DA wrote: Adalwolfa wrote:

You don't need to mess with all 7. In fact, those three connected to the handset on the right - is this how you found them? If you can trust the handset wires and the bell coil wires (on the bottom row), you only need 2 combinations:
Green to the center contact. Then Red to either left or right contacts. From what I can see, the bell coil wires go to those two contacts and one of them should connect to red.
You can just strip the wires off insulation, twist the strands with your fingers so they stay together. Then turn the screw once or twice counterclockwise and stick the wire underneath the brass contact. Then tighten the screw. You don't need the clips for such a tiny job, more trouble to secure wires to the clip than it's worth.
Post here when you succeed, I'd be interested to know the outcome.
Cheers
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