help on building a small pole barn / small animal shelter

I need something for a few goats - two or three, and maybe a couple llmas, etc. I'm thinking 8x8 or maybe 8x16, if I include a place to keep food dry.
I have no experiene with this type of construction, but I do have some woodworking experience and tools. I've just never built a shelter/ enclosure.
Is the pole (4x4) barn the way to go? I don't think I"m ready to spend $s on a concrete footing, and perhaps in time we decide to move this structure.
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In 1991 I built my first structure of this type and it is still standing.
I built an 8x8 to minimize the number of cuts and maximize the space. You should adjust the stringer size for your spans or add an intermediate post.. I dug 6 holes below the heave level for here (18") in the sloping ground, one for each corner and 2 extras on the front to reduce the door size. Then I mixed and poured ready mix into each hole to a depth of about 6" and allowed it to dry. One bag did 2 holes as I recall it now.
I then placed PT treated 4x4x8 in the hole, plumbed, braced it and poured ready-mix to grade level. Again about 1/2 bag per hole.
When cured I came back, stuck a level line and sawed all the posts off at the top. I used 2x6 stringers at the top, middle and 12" off the ground to complete the frame. Actually I think I used 2x6 at the top and 2x4 for the middle and the bottom but I don't recall for sure.
OSB for siding and a roof were added. Primed and painted and still in use today though I don't own it anymore. I built this over a blacktop driveway as a storage building. I don't think the base of the walls will last as long over mud.
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Colbyt
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" I don't think the base of the walls will last as long over mud. "
That was my thought, I built a 3 sided pole building 13' X 26' for my cows in '97, it is still standing and in daily use, but the lower boards are in need of repair. I may use metal, like perlin to replace them. otherwise it has stood up well, several times it was hit with 80mph + winds, & it never swayed or sustained damage. I didn't cement the posts but went with small phone poles which take a lot more to rot off. I skinned it with R panel & roofed with corrugated. How ever big you make it, you will likely with it was bigger. As to food storage, I made an L shaped partition & left room for my barrels on the open side. Consider position carefully, mine needed to face south to shield the cows from the north wind in the winter & take advantage of the cooling from the south wind in the summer.
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How did you do the roof? 8' on front and 7' are rear or similar? Should I skin it with corrugated metal? That seems the simpliest, though I don't know about cost compared to osb and a paint job.
Any books or websites to study?
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How did you do the roof? 8' on front and 7' are rear or similar? Should I skin it with corrugated metal? That seems the simpliest, though I don't know about cost compared to osb and a paint job.
On an 8x8 structure I did a hip roof of osb and shingles so that all the real load was transferred to the corner posts and not bearing on the 2x6 top stringer. It wound up being a point in the center with zero waste for the roof decking as the triangle cut off one piece fit the other side.
Had I gone with 8x12 I would have done the same roof style for the same reasons.
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Colbyt
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Re: the posts. I was thinking 4x4 treated. And I was thinking to just tamp then in 18"-24" (need to verify frost line in NE KS). But the small "pad" of concrete may be a better idea. Former neighbor's builder did that for a large horsebarn. I think he just stat the post on the pad and then backfilled with soil. In my case, should I decide to tear down and move, it would not be an impossible task.
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8x16 is to small for 5 animals I think
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On Jan 20, 2:51am, snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

LM,
So for your barn, the design would be to drop in 3 rows of posts.. Row 1 at something like 9' high; 2nd row 8' high, and 3rd row 7' high. They would be spaced 9' apart. The 9' to 8' area would be for critters, the 8' to 7' would be for feed. It would be one continuous roof and should be 19' - 6" so the 10' sections overlap by 6" or so. From what I've seen it's easier to set the posts close to ideal height, and then later trim them to fit.
Can I use a 4x4? Or must I use 4x6 or 6x6? It seems that is a load bearing question.
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