Help in troubleshooting a leaky window


This summer, we hired a company to re-roof our home. We have a bay kitchen window and a bow window in the back, and a small area above them that the roofers re-shingled and re-flashed.
Last night, we had a windy storm blow through. The bow and bay window both dripped water inside. About a 1/4-1/2 cup of water dripped inside (a few drops at a time over the course of several hours), from the very top of the window trim frame (this trim sits above the windows). I know this is hard to explain with words, so I posted pictures as well:
http://new.photos.yahoo.com/stevew7 /
There were no water leaks from the windows themselves, just the trim above the windows. I also posted an older picture of how the flashing looked before the roofers re-did the area above the windows, and you can see at least over the kitchen, there were no exposed tins and some sort of flashing above the siding. This spring and summer, we had nastier storms with more rain and stronger wind, and these windows never leaked.
So, can anyone provide any advice? Did the roofers not flash around these windows correctly? Or do you think the windows developed a defect? Because these windows were fine this summer before the new roof job, I'm inclined to believe the roofers didn't flash around the windows correctly. Should the silver tins be exposed like they are? Any help would be very much appreciated.
Thanks!
-Steve
PS - remove the nospam in my email address to reply via email. Thanks!
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in buffalo ny we need drip edge. look at (missing) drip edge: http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/knowhow/solutions/article/0,16417,193154,00.html and http://www.rollex.com/pdf/dripedge.pdf but further proper caulking may be needed. or improved flashing at the upper part of the bay shingles. remember dripping water does not necessarily arrive from directly overhead, it may travel some distance from the where the outside wall meets the new shingles and follow an indoor piece of wood to get to the window trim where you finally see it.
stevew7 wrote:

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buffalobill wrote:

http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/knowhow/solutions/article/0,16417,193154,00.html
I'd say bad flashing, at least in the kitchen window, the other'looks' good.
To truly do flashing right, it has to go on before the siding, so it may not be all the new roofers doing.
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The flashing should be OVER the asphalt shingles, NOT under them! Think about where the water is going to go the way they installed it once it hits the flashing......it's going under the shingles. You then sometimes need to use a sealant between the flashing and top of shingles if in a high wind area. Not normally needed tho if flashed with the proper 3 in overhang.
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