Help identify sink drain pipe connection?

I'm planning on connecting the drain of a newly installed sink and I know I need the tail pipe and p trap but I need to connect to the existing drain pipe. The house was built in the northeast US in 1965. Can anyone PLEASE identify the type of connector required to mate up to this drain?
http://www.fdcx.net/pix/drain.jpg
It appears that there might be a piece of the old drain still inserted. What is recommended to make this connection?
Thanks all - signed (NOT a plumber but too cheap to call one)
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Yes, I can.
Tradesman, who needs your business, and isn't giving away hard won knowledge.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I'm planning on connecting the drain of a newly installed sink and I know I need the tail pipe and p trap but I need to connect to the existing drain pipe. The house was built in the northeast US in 1965. Can anyone PLEASE identify the type of connector required to mate up to this drain?
http://www.fdcx.net/pix/drain.jpg
It appears that there might be a piece of the old drain still inserted. What is recommended to make this connection?
Thanks all - signed (NOT a plumber but too cheap to call one)
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On Apr 29, 10:12 pm, "Stormin Mormon"

Are you offering to drive to New England to help the guy out? It would seem that your gas expense might eat into your profit a bit on the one hour job. Then again, maybe not. ;)
R
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There ought to be a chain of Butkraks R Us plumbers who work cheap.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
wrote:

Are you offering to drive to New England to help the guy out? It would seem that your gas expense might eat into your profit a bit on the one hour job. Then again, maybe not. ;)
R
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I am a good Christian. I'm helping my fellow man, who happens to be a plumber in this case.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

That is not nice Chris, I thought you were a good Christian.. Help your fellow man. WW
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On Apr 29, 4:12 pm, snipped-for-privacy@fdcx.net wrote:

Do you have any objections to using a rubber no-hub coupling?
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+1 Yep, Fernco type sounds like the solution.
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On Sun, 29 Apr 2012 22:26:15 -0700 (PDT), Molly Brown

Well thanks all for the feed back. Molly's suggestion what what I ended up doing. I cut the copper pipe behind the soldered on cast adapter and used a rubber connection to join the ABS coming off the trap. Works like a charm.
See? This wasn't worth the cost of calling a plumber. The cost of the rubber adapter was about $3. Its not that I don't want to support my local plumber. Its just that there was no way that cost would be worth the $3 part and my turning of two clamp screws.
I'll save the call for when I actually need him.
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On Apr 29, 7:12 pm, snipped-for-privacy@fdcx.net wrote:

what is recommended? I would get out my torch and remove the short piece of pipe still in the elbow. Solder in a new piece of pipe. Solder on a copper trap adapter. insert the P-trap into the trap adapter. (NOT a plumber neither)
What you have is a short piece of pipe that was cut off still in the elbow. Very tough for a novice to remove especially with just a propane torch.
You could use a rubber Fernco fitting to make the connection to the P- trap and it might not leak for 20 years. but then again...
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looks like galvanized pipe to me
wrote:

what is recommended? I would get out my torch and remove the short piece of pipe still in the elbow. Solder in a new piece of pipe. Solder on a copper trap adapter. insert the P-trap into the trap adapter. (NOT a plumber neither)
What you have is a short piece of pipe that was cut off still in the elbow. Very tough for a novice to remove especially with just a propane torch.
You could use a rubber Fernco fitting to make the connection to the P- trap and it might not leak for 20 years. but then again...
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snipped-for-privacy@fdcx.net wrote:

Looks like a copper drain pipe coming out of the wall with the metal end of an old P-trap still soldered inside the copper pipe.
As someone else suggested, one option is to use a propane or MAP gas torch and heat the pipe to melt the solder and pull out the old drain pipe that is inside. Then solder the new one in place.
Or, as also suggested elsewhere, the easiest option would be to connect the new P-trap pipe to the old drain line using a "Fernco" (it's a brand name) rubber coupling. That would be my vote.
If you print out the photo and bring it to Home Depot or a hardware store or a plumbing supply place, they'll tell you what you need.
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On Sun, 29 Apr 2012 19:12:55 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@fdcx.net wrote:

You are admittedly too cheap to call a plumber and too inexperienced to know what you're looking at so here is my $0.02.
C A L L A P L U M B E R ! !
Obviously you're going to screw up your attempt to fix the problem. This could result in a continuous small leak that will lead to mold or worse or... in dealing with the copper you could catch something on fire and then your drain issue will be the least of your worries. In the long run a plumber will be much cheaper.
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On Apr 29, 6:12 pm, snipped-for-privacy@fdcx.net wrote:

Yes, it does look like an old piece of pipe is left inside the outer pipe. Do you want quick and not quite permanent, or longer and more permanent??
Quick and dirty, use a Fernco type flexible coupling. Should last 10+ yearsif you don't put anything chemically really strong down the drain.
Take longer and last almost forever, use a big torch and melt solder and remove old insert pipe and start over. More expensive if you use copper fittings, but should last 25+ years
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