HE Washer

Page 1 of 2  
We just bought a new Maytag High Efficiency washing machine.
So far, we've only done about 8 loads and it seems to do a very good job. It is scary to watch though. Have you seen one of these things operate? It has a glass lid so you can watch the entire process.
You set the cycle, push start and it locks the lid and goes. Water comes in from the center top. Then it flows thought the detergent cup. The water stops, then the drum spins at a medium speed. Then it slows and water flows in again, this time from a spray that shoots the water onto the clothes lining the drum. Then it comes in from two sources.
Finally filled, it starts to agitate while pumping water at times. Then it goes into rinse cycles with more water flowing from various places but this time it also flows through the fabric softener cup if selected. At one point, it directs water through the bleach, the detergent, then the softener cups.
It spins, it stops, it reveres , it spins again. It is more interesting to watch than 90% of what is on TV and has an instrument panel with about the same number of LEDs as a 787 Dreamliner.
The scary part is all those strange functions and valves sequencing. How long before a breakdown? I just don't see it as reliable as the machines of the past. I'm sure there is at least one good sized circuit board and a bunch of solenoids and sensors. It determines the amount of clothes and then add the appropriate amount of water
I've always been dead set against extended warranties, but $150 for five additional years may be cheap. I'll have to think about it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I would guess about 2 - 3 year at most.

I wonder what is the life-cycle ownership cost for the fancy model, vs. the cost for the old style heavy-duty top loader? How much water saving does that extra cost save?
--
Web based forums are like subscribing to 10 different newspapers
and having to visit 10 different news stands to pickup each one.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/6/2013 7:51 AM, CRNG wrote:

We actually bought an HE front loader (GE) four years ago and after 2 1/2 years of use, replaced it with a GE top loader. It did not break down at all. But, it didn't clean the cloths and it never really rinsed the soap out completely. We always used the 'extra rinse' function and even ran the cloths through an extra complete 'quick wash' (with it's rinse and extra rinse cycles) with no soap the 2nd time. Even with that, sometimes, the cloths would come out with some soap residue, causing itching to the skin. Since converting to the top loader, itching is gone.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

One person I know says she saves about $7 a month. I'm not sure that is real dollars or what the salesman told her she could save.
The price difference from the regular styles looks to be about $200. Maytag offers only one model of the old type, all the rest are HE. Like it or not, it is the future. Probably part of the "Full Employment for Appliance Technicians Act.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I would guess the salesman told her that. It seems very high to me. I would want to see exactly how that was calculated before I would believe it.
--
Web based forums are like subscribing to 10 different newspapers
and having to visit 10 different news stands to pickup each one.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's not just the cost savings of the water.
Since the spin cycles are so fast, clothes come out much dryer so less energy is used to dry them. My dry times were cut in half and many loads can be dried on low heat for even more savings.
In addition, they say that front loaders are less abusive on the clothes themselves than top loaders with agitators. I don't know about top loading HE. Machines without agitators.
There more factors involved in the total cost of ownership than just the water savings.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 6 Oct 2013 13:18:19 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

Yes, that is what scares me!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 6 Oct 2013 13:18:19 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

Some top-loaders have high-speed spin cycles, as well.

There should be no difference. They should actually do better because they don't tend to knot the clothes.

Water is a trivial component.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

This is a top loader, but I can still see potential problems with all the technology and extra parts built in.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/6/2013 8:50 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

We've had a Maytag Centenial top loader for about 3-4 years now and it still functions perfectly. Don't know about warranty but if it were front loader I would have considered one because I always figured these would fail by leaking.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 06 Oct 2013 09:23:32 -0400, Frank

Out top loader only went five years before leaking all over. It had been getting noisier for several years. I figure five years is about all a modern washer is good for. Dryers probably twice that, so every other one, we'll buy the set.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In 1989 we bought a Speed Queen top-loader. It had a couple of big dials that you cranked around to set the various cycles. It lasted 17 years before it started acting up and Himself thought it was time to replace it. We'd replaced a few things over the years; belts and whatnot.
We got a front loader of some sort. The control panel looked like the bridge of the Starship Enterprise. After about three years, it stopped spinning properly. After some Web investigation, he said "Well, it could be this; it could be that; it could be the other. I could go through several hundred dollars of parts figuring out what it is."
We got a Speed Queen AWN432, outwardly just about like the one we bought in 1989. I believe it uses a bit less water. And was about half the price of the Starship Enterprise. Maybe it won't last 17 years, but I'm pretty sure it'll see 10.
Cindy Hamilton
--





Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 09 Oct 2013 19:31:48 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@adi.com (Cindy Hamilton) wrote:

I thought I'd get ten years, too. I thought it being a top-loader would help (front-loaders are notorious for early death) but apparently it's not a design issue, rather, they're all designed to fail. I've resigned myself to replacing the washer every five years and the dryer every ten. So be it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/6/2013 8:23 AM, Frank wrote:

My Maytag toploader is from 1985 and so far has only required one service call.
They don't make 'em like they used to, which is why I'll hold onto this one as long as possible.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/6/2013 8:50 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

When I was shopping for appliances (range and w/d), I read the reviews and there seemed to be one common theme, which was a fried circuit board. Everything has electronic controls, so what the problem is is a mystery. Cheap Chinese boards? Power surges? No problems with ours, so far, but no whole-house thingy for protection.
Our Maytag is about 9 mos old, just two of us. I always use the "bulky load" feature to get more water so my clothes don't get ground to shreds; always a good deal of lint in the dryer filter. Washing with the regular setting looks like it's about the same as slamming clothes against the rocks on the river bank :o)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've got a spare circuit board ready and waiting in case mine ever goes bad. I had a problem with my Frigidaire front loader. 2 out of 3 symptoms pointed to the rather expensive circuit board. 1 symptom indicated the relatively inexpensive door lock solenoid. Guess which part I tried first, then guess which part it turned out to be.
I know, I know... I should have tried the cheaper part first, but I played the odds and lost. I consider the spare circuit board as insurance. I'll probably never, ever need it. ;-)
The other problem with my washer is a stress crack that keeps showing up in the plastic bezel above the control panel. I had the bezel replaced once under warranty, and then a few years later I replaced it myself at my cost. A few years later it cracked in the exact same location, so I quit worrying about it and left the cracked bezel in place.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/6/2013 12:23 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Mine which they still sell may not have this control panel problem:
http://www.maytag.com/-%5BMVWC200BW%5D-1107176/MVWC200BW/
I'd worry about these things too having to put $300 into a stove control panel repair.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Ed Pawlowski" wrote in message
We just bought a new Maytag High Efficiency washing machine.
So far, we've only done about 8 loads and it seems to do a very good job. It is scary to watch though. Have you seen one of these things operate? It has a glass lid so you can watch the entire process.
You set the cycle, push start and it locks the lid and goes. Water comes in from the center top. Then it flows thought the detergent cup. The water stops, then the drum spins at a medium speed. Then it slows and water flows in again, this time from a spray that shoots the water onto the clothes lining the drum. Then it comes in from two sources.
Finally filled, it starts to agitate while pumping water at times. Then it goes into rinse cycles with more water flowing from various places but this time it also flows through the fabric softener cup if selected. At one point, it directs water through the bleach, the detergent, then the softener cups.
It spins, it stops, it reveres , it spins again. It is more interesting to watch than 90% of what is on TV and has an instrument panel with about the same number of LEDs as a 787 Dreamliner.
The scary part is all those strange functions and valves sequencing. How long before a breakdown? I just don't see it as reliable as the machines of the past. I'm sure there is at least one good sized circuit board and a bunch of solenoids and sensors. It determines the amount of clothes and then add the appropriate amount of water
I've always been dead set against extended warranties, but $150 for five additional years may be cheap. I'll have to think about it.
As a old retired appliance repairman I am glad I no longer need to work on this junk. The OLD type top load Maytag is the one to buy. WW
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/6/2013 9:02 AM, WW wrote:

I like the old belt drive Whirlpool. That's what I've got, and it has served since 1994, and it was used back then. I've had to repair it a couple times, as expected.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
we need a new washer soon, my girl friend has been doing research..
maytag has a terrible reputation, so do most of the top loaders. easy to get off balance, wash time always 1 hour no matter what the timer setting.
my best friend bought a new washer a year ago and reports both these issues.
so we really dont know what to buy. my washer and dryer date back to 1990..so nearly 25 years old. my other washer and dryer are near 20 years old...
they are now worn out, having 2 of each are nice
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.