HDMI VS Componet Video

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What is the difference between HDMI and Component Video. I recently bought an HDMI cable and hooked it up from my cable box to my HD TV. It was not a MONSTER cable as they are stupidly overpriced etc. It was just a normal one. The results as viewed by myself and my wife was that the Component video source from the cable box looks just as good if not better than the HDMI feed. ( these component cables were left with my by Time Warner when they delivered the HD DVR) Any explanations or opinions on this.
Thanks,
R
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You could have an HD TV but not be viewing any HD content. HDMI connections are also communication cable between component processors. (For instance, if you put a BluRay in your player, the TV will switch to HDMI (if it wasn't already).
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ROANIN wrote:

HDMI is a digital interface. Component video is an analog interface. Depending on your "cable box" and television, the quality of the A/D converters, and the quality of your cables, you may find either to provide a better image.
Generally, in an all digital train, you would use a high quality (NOT monster) HDMI interface, especially at higher resolutions, to avoid D/A-A/D loss.
Jon
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On Nov 20, 9:15 am, "Jon Danniken"

converters, and the quality of your cables, you may find either to provide a better image.
Generally, in an all digital train, you would use a high quality (NOT monster) HDMI interface, especially at higher resolutions, to avoid D/ A-A/D loss.
Jon
Drop the vernacular and explain in common terms...so he understands. Not so you can express or impress!
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Bob Villa wrote:

I thought I did that, "Bob". Which part are you having trouble understanding?
Jon
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On Nov 20, 9:50 am, "Jon Danniken"

I'm not...but HE wants it explained...so, please aim a bit lower. ^L^
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Bob Villa wrote:

OK so what is a "High quality" HDMI cable consist of? They all say they are the best thing since sliced bread and the prices are all over the place.
R
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ROANIN wrote:

I don't know any brands (other than to avoid monster like the plague), as HD isn't my thing. If you are looking for one, go to where HD guys hang out, and ask there. Maybe poke around newegg and see what the geeks say has the best bang for the buck.
In other words, not the most expensive, and not the cheapest. Find one in the middle that everyone says is a damn fine cable. They might even have it at walmart.
Jon
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Amazon Basics is a good line. If you really want, you can get their braided versions for a few bucks more.
The thing that annoys me about HDMI is that the various version numbers do not reflect the functionality of the cable. The version number (1.1, 1.3a, 1.3b, etc.) refer to the clock rate the cable supports and not necessarily additional features such as back channel communication.
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On Nov 20, 11:47 am, "Jon Danniken"

It's a digital protocol and interface. For the typical 3-7 feet cable run, how much you pay or what HDMI cable you use i not going to make any difference. The cable doesn't affect the quality of the A/D or D/ A conversion unless the signal degrades so badly that the receiving end can't distinguish a high level, ie "1" from a low level signal, ie "0". That;s one of the great advantages of digital. If you're going 50+ feet, then I'd consider cable issues.
As for HDMI vs component, except for the HDMI cable part, I agree with John. With HDMI, the conversion from digital to analog occurs in the display. With component, it occurs in the cable,sat box, or DVD player. So, it can depend on the quality of one of those converters versus the other. But in general, I doubt you'd notice the difference. I've tried both on my 42" Sony and I can't notice any difference in picture quality.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Generally, I would agree. However, newer versions of HDMI cables support higher bit rates and suffer less crosstalk. I found I had to replace a couple of very early (read: old) HDMI cables when I upgraded some system components to 1080p which requires the higher bitrates.
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If the picture looks fine, just use the component cables. I've hooked my TV up to 2 different inputs using component and HDMI at the same time. I have switched back and forth and I don't see any noticeable difference. HDMI is just more convenient. 1 cable vs. 5.
Also, I have to use component cables, because for some stupid reason the HDMI output on my HD DVR overrides the digital audio output that I need for my stereo receiver.
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Does this help explain anything? "Generally, in an all digital train, you would use a high quality (NOT monster) HDMI interface, especially at higher resolutions, to avoid D/ A-A/D loss. " Simply...no!
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Bullshit. You can't see the difference.
BTW, what is the model number of this Sony WEGA CRT HDTV that you own?
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Non-answer, noted.
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Smitty seems to believe that any THEORETICAL advantage becomes important, regardless of whether humans can perceive it or not. Many audiophiles make the same leaps when purchasing analog audio cables costing $1000 or more. Like you Ron, I've compared HDMI and component on my 42" Sony and can't see any difference either with cable or Blue Ray. The truth is that supposedly pure digital signal undergoes all kinds of manipulation in the digital world that will have a bigger impact on the resulting picture than any D/A conversion. Among those are conversion from the original source to compressed digital, compression by the cable/sat company to transmit it, conversion from the incoming source to the native resolution of the display inside the TV, etc.
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On Sun, 21 Nov 2010 04:57:53 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I am surprised nobody mentioned why the industry is trying to get everyone on HDMI.
There is Digital Rights Management hardware built into that HDMI interface so they can stop you from watching that copy of a DVD you made or an unsigned show you downloaded from the internet. Beyond the easily defeated Macrovision, there was not much they could do with the analog signals. The open question is how far this censorship could go. There is no hardware reason why future adapters could not restrict your viewing to things that had the "approved" bit on.
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On Nov 21, 7:57 am, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Yeah, I've been trying to get my cable company to run a HDMI cable from their office to my home, so far no luck. How dare them use that shitty RG7/RG11 coax cable!
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On Sat, 20 Nov 2010 09:57:34 -0500, ROANIN wrote:

HDMI can also carry audio. I switched from HDMI to component on my HD-DVR because the HDTV actually looks a bit better at 1080i with component. And the audio goes into a 5.1 amp via optical cable anyway so no need for the HDMI.
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If you are watching a DVD the program material (audio and video) are recorded as a series of 1/0 bits on the DVD. In the US, pre-HD TV was analog, so at some point those 1/0 bits had to be converted to analog to form lines and levels. Older analog TVs had three color guns - red, green and blue, so the 1/0 bits were separated into three analog streams. That's what component video is.
Since no digital to analog conversion is perfect, there is always a little quality loss. Really good conversions had almost imperceptible loss, poor conversions had more.
Digital TV changed all that. A video frame consists of picture elements known as pixels. Each pixel is represented by a collection of bits. The bits for each pixel define the color and intensity of that pixel. Those bits can be taken from the DVD and displayed with no analog conversion needed. Since bits can represent both audio and vidio information, it's no long necessary to have separate cables for each. The interface for connecting a digital device to a digital display is HDMI.
For most consumers, the difference between a good component video and a digital signal is undetectible. However, Hollywood was not keen on having perfect digital copies of their content floating around the world, so they insisted that the interface between the DVD and HD TV be encrypted. In order to get the decryption keys, DVD and TV manufacturers had to agree to certain design standards that would theoretically protect the data from being copied.
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