Hardwood Flooring in a Double Wide?

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On Wed 08 Oct 2008 03:15:41p, gecko told us...

Well, whichever way you decide to go, I wish you good luck. Oh, and do report back.
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Wayne Boatwright
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On Wed 08 Oct 2008 12:25:41p, Pete C. told us...

Right, pier support is definitely adequate.

Good options.
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On Wed 08 Oct 2008 11:52:02a, gecko told us...

Actually, if it were mine, I would still pursue real hardwood flooring. It would add stability to your existing subfloor. There are some laminates, howeer, that have a thinner top layer of real wood.
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Wayne Boatwright
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:

OP did state otherwise- he called it a 'double-wide trailer'.
What you are describing is, around here, called a 'modular' home. I never hear the term double-wide applied to those. Basic dividing line seems to be, is the house designed for use in a 'manufactured home community', or as a alternative to a stick-built house?
I'm old fashioned- if it has metal floor joists, it is a trailer, AFAIAC. Yes, most of them are a lot better than they used to be. But by virtue of the price point they have to make, they all compromise somewhere. Flip side of that is, few stick-built houses are as good as they used to be, unless you have the money and knowledge to make the builder build it properly.
And as to the moisture underneath- unless they are on a real foundation with proper drainage, yes, they are prone to being damp underneath. Skirting is decorative, if it only goes down to ground level. Most crawl spaces I have seen are damp, too, since almost nobody bothers to address drainage in those either. I'm lucky- on this half-ass addition I am sitting in as I type this, at least they did the crawl right- deep and dry, with correct grading on the outside. More like a 3 1/2 foot tall basement with a dirt floor. Sure wish they would have spent the extra few thousand to make a real basement attached to the original basement, though.
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On Tue 07 Oct 2008 05:53:55p, aemeijers told us...

I'm sorry, but I actually did miss that statement. Still, in some areas, manufactured homes are referred to as trailers, since their method of arrival is on a removable wheelbase.

In our area, "modular" refers to a home built from various multiple units that end up joined together, often with as little as an individual room being a module. Manufactured homes cover everything else, except those that are true "trailers".

Our manufactured home has 2 x 6 wooden floor and wall joists. All of our joists, including ceiling, are 16" on center. We have 3/4" plywood subflooring and 5/8" thick drywall, along with better insulation than we had in our stick built house that was built in 2000. I do not consider it a trailer by any means. It arrived in two segments which were then joined down the middle line. There are also triple and quad wides that are similarly assembled, and may be as large as 3600 sq. ft. Their construction is quite substantial.

We have an approximately 3 1/2 foot tall crawlspace below the house, with concrete block and pour concrete stem walls. It has a dirt floor, but there is a central drain which flows to our septic tank.
One advantage we also have is that we live in the desert, so moisture is seldom something one needs to consider, with or without a drain.
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