gutter screens-"gutterfilter"?

anyone have any experience with a foam product called "gutterfilter"?
thanks, tom
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I recently spent more time than a rational human being probably ought to plowing thru this same type of gutter guard/screen/filter question on one home improvement Web site. And no matter what, the consunsus on this subject seems to be exactly the same: When it comes to gutter devices, save your time and money because they either don't work, or don't work as well as the commercials lead you to think they do. If you keep your gutters free of leaves and crap, you should have no need whatsoever for any sort of gutter guards or screens. Otherwise, if you're unable or too lazy to do it yourself, hire some neighborhood kid or gutter cleaning service to clean out the leaves and maple tree whirlygigs and other glop every spring and fall -- you'll still end up spending less over 20-30 years if hiring someone to do it for you than you would on gutter guards.
AJS
snipped-for-privacy@mindspring.com (dtbray) wrote:

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I couldn't disagree more. I have gutter guards over a section of gutter where there is heavy leaf fall. The guard has kept all the leaves out. This is the add-on kind of screen, not the "leafguard" type of gutter with built-in guard. The gutter company charged $2/foot extra and it was well worth it.
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hi Jed, do think your gutter cover would work if pine needles were the problem rather than leaves?
tom
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Depends on whether you had enough pine needles spearing their way into the screen holes and clogging up the screens something fierce -- thereby making all that rain run over the screen/gutters and to the ground, and potentially causing seepage problems.
I've lived in northwest Florida and have seen long pine needles and gutter screens interacting during torrential downpours -- and the results weren't anything I'd want happening around my foundation.
AJS
snipped-for-privacy@mindspring.com (dtbray) wrote:

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While everything seems all hunky-dory now, stand under those screened gutters (especially if you're unfortunate enough to have a jillion maple tree whirlygigs stuck in all the little holes) during a torrential rainstorm and let us know how dry you end up.
But then again, it's your money -- and if you felt it was well-spent, then peachy keen. Glad you're happy. Most people don't seem to be.
AJS
snipped-for-privacy@epsno.com (Jedd Haas) wrote:

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dtbray wrote:

take a piece of copper tubing that i had i think its either 3/8 or 1/2 in. and put a fitting on one end and attached it to a hose and the other end is bendt like a hoop.. i have a one store house and dont even have to get up on a ladder anymore.... just run the water all along and flush the leaves out as i move along the house holding the copper tubing into the gutter pan......
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For the less mechanically-inclined, there are a few places where you can get a ready-made contraption like Jim's that attaches to your garden hose and will pressure-blast leaves and crud out of your gutter. One I've seen is advertised on TV; another I've seen is available thru a catalog outfit called Improvements (they have a regular mailed catalog and a Web catalog; Google will find the Web one for you). They're all telescoping or just really long for the benefit of those who own something taller than a ranch house. Heck, I think even the Harriet Carter catalog carries a version of it.
AJS

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GutterFilter works great... I have 260 ft installed, and no clogs
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- snipped-for-privacy@mindspring.com -

- Nehmo - The above triple-post is a advertisement dishonestly posing as a testimonial. And, as I've heard, the product doesn't work. Stuff grows in your gutters if you use it.
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* Nehmo Sergheyev *
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I think the best gutter guards are the ones that go over the top of the gutter, closing it off and leaving only a narrow slit open under the front edge. They rely on the surface tension of water. The water curves around the edge and goes in, the debris goes over and off the roof. I've tried the add on plastic version of this on a section of mine. I have very heavy tree leaves and it seems to work fine. The water goes where it's supposed to, even in heavy rain. I suppose a real super cloud burst might go overboard, but that would be pretty rare.
If I were doing new gutters, this is the type I would definitely go with.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Eric
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57 channels and nothin's on



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In a previous posting, Usenet was endowed with the following text from snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net:

Think about what the statement above says. It suggests closing off your gutters is a good idea, leaving a tiny slit open under the front edge. It boggles my mind that some people will close off perfectly good rain gutters AND pay through the nose for some snake oil product that people believe will work better than open gutters when it rains, and make their gutter forever maintenance free. It just proves what suckers the average Joe really is.

In carefully controlled demonstrations, this works most of the time. I have witnessed, on more than one occasion, a salesperson demonstrating gutter covers in which they use pine straw or a dollar bill (to mimic a leaf), drop it on their "running water" display, and the debris follows the flow of water right into the gutter. One guy had to turn off the water and use a ratchet to unbolt the cover and take the cover off to get his dollar bill back out.
Gutter covers that use surface tension of the water will work to some degree all of the time, but are not maintenance free and don't work well at all in a heavy downpour or on roofs with more than average pitch. In any event, they are not worth the ridiculous price dealers charge for these things.

I wonder what planet you're living on. It can't be Earth. The add-on plastic units you get at the home improvement stores are the WORST on the market, in design and function. The curved edge is too abrupt and water with any velocity will not make the dramatic change of direction to enter the gutters... at least, not in large quantities. Covers with a longer, more rounded edge handle water better, but also take in more debris.
I'll say one thing for the people who sell gutter covers... they've got a good gimmick going and they're milking it for everything they can...
RC
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Again, you are ignorant of them.
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