GPM Restricted?

Hello,
As I am new not only to the rural life but also to the home owners life, I have a question regarding my water system that I was hoping anyone can help shed the light on.
Right now I seem to be just fine with the pressure of water I get at any of my faucets and other outlets, however, the problem I have comes into play when there are to many water sources going at once. For instance, I can only have one sprinkler on in the yard at a time and if I happen to flush the toilet, consider that sprinkler off. Or if I am filling up the tub, there is almost no water coming out of the head for someone taking a shower.
My premilinary thoughts are the GPM I am getting into the house. The well we have is rated a little above 20 GPM, which I know is more than suffucient for just about anything. So the question comes into play on whether the pump is inefficient or if it is the pre-pressurized water system tank. I do not know right now the type of pump I have as I can't seem to find any documentation on it (will have to call the builder to find out). But I did notice that the water system tank I have is a Champion model CH4202. The GPM rating is for 7 on this tank system. So I am wondering if this tank system could be limiting the flow of water into the house from what it would be getting instead and this is the reason I see the loss of water whenever I turn more than one thing on? Any advice would be greatly appreciated to help with this issue I am having.
Thanks, Ron
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
GoneRural wrote: ....

Will the well actually do 20 gpm or is that the max rating of the pump?

I have no idea how there would be a gpm rating on a pressure tank...all it is is a pressure reservoir and surge tank if it is a small volume tank--otherwise it is also a volume source to minimize well cycling.

Sounds to me like he plumbed the service entrance w/ small diameter copper as well instead of something >1" from the well to the house entrance, then down to normal 3/4 and 1/2 distribution.
I suppose there could be a filtration system somewhere inline that is restricting flow as well.
If it's a new house, I'd get the guy out and get them to fix it--that's not satisfactory.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks everyone for the replies!
Here is some more info:
1. The well is what is rated according the documentation I have for 20gpm. 2. I do believe that the lines are 1/2", I just need to confirm (didn't get a chance to look last night). 3. The PSI on the pressure tank is set to 40/60psi. 4. This is a new house build.
The reason I ask about the tank restricting flow is because I noticed that there are other models from this company that support a higher gpm, so I was under the assumption that maybe the tank system was restricing the flow. I am trying to get in touch with the builder again to get more information on the pump and the entire plumbing setup. As soon as I do I will try to post some more information.
Would it be helpful to put use a flow gage at the tank to see what I am getting there?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
GoneRural wrote:

Is that an flow test and if so, where was the output flow measured--at the pump discharge before it was plumbed, perhaps?
How long a run is it from the well to the tank and what is it plumbed with?
Where is the tank--in the basement or in a wellhouse somewhere else? If the latter, how far a run is that and what is it plumbed with?
Still don't see why a pressure tank has a gpm rating--typically it would be the volume rating of the tank.
I'm still betting you just have a too small upstream distribution system to supply the downstream flow.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
When I get home from work I will look at the plans to see what the distances are. The house is a raised ranch and the tank system is on the bottom floor and for the most part is in the center of all the plumbing work above. Once I can get hold of the contractor, I will be able to answer the other questions unless they are marked on my documents and I can get it from there.
Thanks again all for you help and I will post the additional information tongiht.
Ron
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
GoneRural wrote:

A couple of other points...
Regarding the pump flow test again...was that the drillers' test w/ a jet pump at the completion of the hole or the actual output of the installed pump? If the former, the latter may not have near the same capacity. Also, what is sustained flow rate and was that tested? IOW, does the well have a sustained 20gpm flow rate or is that rapidly discharged and then the well is limited to some much smaller rate? In that case you may need a much larger pressure tank to have adequate usage rates.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
GoneRural wrote:

I agree with Duane. I have never seen a GPM rating on a tank. A tank will produce any gpm possible from almost zilch with a needle size pipe to infinity with a pipe the size of the tank. Any gallonage rating on the tank will be the drawdown capacity, i.e., how many gallons can be drawn from a full tank before the pump kicks in. 7 gal sounds about like a 20gallon tank, another sign the builder went on the cheap.
Very few residential pumps will produce 20 gpm. The rated production of a well is done when well is finished and is how much the well will produce without a drop in the level, i.e., continuous pumping capacity. 20 gpm is an outstanding well.
You must have a restriction somewhere, even a cheap pump will run more than one fixture. I would first look at the any valve from were the water line enters the house to include the one on the tank itself to be sure they are all full open.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Might sound like a dumb question....but is the entire home plumbed in 1/2 inch?
Think volume.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 22 Aug 2005 15:54:43 -0400, "Carolina Breeze HVAC"

The problem with well systems is the pressure runs in the range 30-50 PSI. Most municipal systems run closer to 60-80PSI and that is what faucets are rated for. Bigger pipe helps but you still have the lower pressures.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

That is <not> the cause a problem such as the OP posts. We have all the volume needed w/ three hoses outside to still take multiple showers and have adequate flow. The pressure tank is on 20-40 and is perfectly adequate although could just as easily be 30-50 if I were to choose to switch out the the pressure switch and add some air to the tank...Oh, did I mention we're watering 1000 head of cattle during 100F days w/ the same well, as well?
Carolina is correct--there's a restriction somewhere and having run 1/2" from the well/pressure tank throughout sounds like a possibility of a contractor trying to get by on the cheap....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Why not connect a sprinkler direct to the well and see if it works?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I would get someone to size the piping for you house. If it's an older house it could be under sized. You might be able to see you piping. If it is old Galvanized it could be just corroded beyond repair.One thing to check sounds dumb see if all the valves are open all the way or if one might broken ( that's a tough one to determine) Sometimes cheap gate valves stems break if you notice it is turning forever that might be a singe. One thing people get confused about is Pressure and Volume/GPM. You can have a 100 PSI in a 1/4" line but what kind of volume would get.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.