Good Choice of Table Saw for very casual home use ??

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Phisherman wrote:

Maybe. I recently needed a 2x5' piece of 3/4" plywood for a kitchen sink countertop.
I could have putzed around building supports for my admittedly tiny table saw, or I could have spent some moderately serious bucks for a used, substantial, table saw.
Instead I opted for the "Free two cuts" policy at Home Depot. I got my 2x5' counter top and some nice sized scraps for the cost of the plywood sheet alone.
So, one's choice of a table saw might depend on a) How often a project involving a 4x8 sheet comes up and b) Whether one has alternatives available.
And, speaking of Home Depot's board cutting policy, does anyone own one of those saws HD uses? The kind where the circular saw blade moves up and down on a stationary, vertical piece of wood? I'd think that machine would take up considerable less space than a table saw ('course you'd lose wall space...).
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HeyBub wrote:

You have a good HD. The ones here have a saw that rotates and they shove the panel through horizontally for rips. Nothing holds the top piece up as it is going along, so accuracy isn't its forte.
I had a friend in Honolulu with a vertical one...set up the panel, position things, push button, full length cushioned clams on both sides of the cut line clamp down, saw travels down on steel tubes, returns to top after cut, clamps unclamp. A *wonderful* machine. No idea of the cost, several thousand I am sure.
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dadiOH
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wrote:
-snip-

Don't own one, but I've thought of building one- http://plansnow.com/dn3087.html
If I was in the OP's shoes I might consider building one for the big stuff- and getting that miter saw for the fine things.
Takes up room- but as someone mentioned above, it lends itself to being one side of a wood rack.
Jim
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James,
We have a Ryobi table saw with a built in folding stand that we purchased at HD about 5 years ago that we use for a jobsite saw. I would not call it a quality saw but it does the job. We paid about $200 for it. If you want quality look for a used contractor style table saw on craigslist. You can get them for $300 - $350 around here. It would probably last you the rest of your life. Make sure you buy a good blade $50 - $100.
cm

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wrote:

First your price limit is low, so it will be hard to find one that is quality at that price. In fact, hard to find anything at that price.
Consider good used! With today's economy used tools are going for pennys on the dollar, so a reasonable saw can easily be gotten for $150.
Also consider seriously a radial arm saw instead of a table saw. Much more versitle and will do (with some practice) everythign that a table saw will do, and much, much more. Even a better Sears Crapsman radial arm saw can be gotten used for virtually nothing. Try Craig's list and eBay. If eBay, only bid on local items so you can inspect it first, and pick it up to avoid shipping. These can be big and heavy so shipping can be a PITA...
I ship 100 to 150 lb packages motor freight all the time, and for a run from Virginia to NH (about 600 miles) we pay about $100 for the shipment. UPS Freight and FedEx freight, if you have an account, can be cheaper, we ship 200+ lb shipments from TX to NH monthly for about $150 using UPS Freight.
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PeterD wrote:

I gave away a really good condition crafstman radial arm saw last year. The thing was a moose to move around, took up a lot of space and the slightest jam would knock it out of alignment.

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I always use a Makita or a De Walt for mobile use in my construction business. I would suggest the same for you. You can get leg stand for these saws also. they work fine, rip plywood, 2x and much more. they are light weight, and easy to use. these are the small job table saws..... The most important part of a saw is a "sharp blade" and one made for the type of wood you are ripping. I see too many homeowners with fine saws and dull blades burning through a piece of wood...... jloomis

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James wrote:

You can get a good Black and Decker table saw for $99.00 good enough for your use. Also handy is a miter saw. I bought a Ryobi 10 inch compound miter saw for $59.00 before Christmas. Watch the sales and you might get a table saw with stand for 50 bucks.
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>snip<
Odds are what you have been using and calling a skill saw is really a wretched sidewinder 7 1/4" circular saw. What pros use is the genuine worm drive circular saw and the difference in following a straight line is like night and day. The balance of the right tool and the blade visibility make the all the difference. The famous model 77 SkilSaw worm drive is now made by Bosch and marketed as well under their name with a different color and a Twistlock cord. The 77 design has been made with few changes for around 80 years I'm told. It's easily worth the $50 premium over all the other direct drive saws. My DeWalt direct drive saw now sits in the corner covered with dust along with some other purchasing mistakes destined for the village auction while the 77 gets a workout. One of the neat things about the 77 design is that the blade offset is 1 1/2" on one side and 3 1/2" on the other, perfect for framing. There is also a hook to hang it on a rafter. With a smooth 2 x 4 and a pair of clamps (and sawhorses) accurate cutting of full plywood panels is a breeze. Try one out from a rental place and see if it will work for you.
Joe
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Buy a speed square for cross cutting. To rip, clamp a straight edge to the 2x4.

If it's 45, the speed square will do it for you.

Clamp a straight edge to the plywood and use the skill saw. You don't need a metal edge. The factory edge on another sheet of plywood will do fine.

I think a table saw is over kill for what you describe. The good ones are expensive and take up a lot of space. The bad ones are more aggravation than they are worth. -- Doug
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wrote:

BS , I've used my 10 inch Ryobi table saw that came with a stand for $99 to rip plywood , 1X pine , 2X4's , ect. and it works just fine as long as you don't force it...It might not be as fast as the big dollar ones but it gets the job done..We aren't talking about using it for everyday construction use or ripping 3/4 Birch plywood all day in a cabinett making shop..IT IS FOR OCCASIONAL HOMEOWNER USE which is what this thread is SUPPOSED to be about....I have a Ryobi 10 compound miter saw that I paid $75 for that worked just fine trimming out my new windows as well...When not in use I set the miter saw on top of the table saw and put them in the corner of my garage and they don't take up much space and you don't need 3 people to move them around either...They're perfect for what they were designed to do...
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If the saw worked for you great. That does not mean it is as good as the bigger, more expensive saws. I had a cheap Craftsman saw and built some nice projects with it. After a time I found the shortcomings and bought a Delta contractors with a Beisemeyer fence. saw. It is a vast improvement. It comes down to your needs and expectations. And the blade.
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wrote:

Amen, brother.
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benick wrote:

I'm out of corners! The one nook in my garage where a non-folded-up table saw could be parked, is where I have to park the snow blower 5 months a year. (Unless I wanna traipse through drifts out to the garden shed every time I want to use it.)
Not to mention, damp garages are hell on table saws, even if you keep the table well-waxed.
-- aem sends...
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aemeijers wrote:

Heh! Use the saw to build a shed into which you can put the snow-blower, the lawn-mower, the auxilary generator, and other assorted things. That will free up space for the tools.
Don't forget to include a cat-door so the critters can get out of the elements.
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James wrote:

There are dozens I see free or cheap on craigslist or freecycle every month. How about a used saw. Old Craftsmans are very common.
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James I use a speed square a a sawguide to cross-cut boards and a long saw guide for plywood. I have a table saw but most often use these. I think the circular saw with a saw guilde works better than the table saw.
Jimmie
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On Sat, 7 Feb 2009 21:40:41 -0500, James wrote:

Trim pieces would best be cut with a miter saw. Cutting a 2x4 is best done with a miter saw, ripping with a table saw. Plywood with a table saw. However, from your description I would not consider a table saw as you do not seem to have the skills to safely use a table saw. Table saws are not good for cutting trim pieces to length. Table saws are for cutting widths, not lengths.
Before buying something I would seriously consider taking a shop class at your local community college to learn what the different saws are for and how to safely use them.
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Michael Dobony wrote:

What's to know? 1. Don't put soft things in the blade. 2. Stand to the side so kick-backs don't de-nut you. 3. If you're a wimp, wear eye protection. 4. If you're a pussy, wear ear protection.
Everything, and I mean EVERYTHING, you need to know about safety can be found in the 52-page safety instructions that come with the saw.
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LOL. On #3 you might add "If OSHA is looking.
On #2 someone should point out that Douglas Fir is probably the #1 kickback culprit and a suit of armor might be appropriate under certain circumstances.

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