Gluing down click-lock hardwood floor

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wrote:

And look at all the expense and trouble he wants to do, when all he really needs to do is apply a coat of brown enamel paint to the concrete so it matches the color of wood.
Better yet, paint it gray so it looks like concrete!!!!
Or paint it green like a nice mowed lawn!
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Jud posted for all of us...

Thanks for letting us know that <NOT> <TOO LATE>. Did your research there didn't you?
--
Tekkie

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Easier to remove than glued down - and I have NO squeaks. (I put about 100 lbs of screws in the plywood subfloor and made sure the crossbracing on the joists was 100% solid)
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On Fri, 12 Aug 2016 16:11:09 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

This is on a concrete slab, so I think glue is the only way to go. That is what they did with the other two rooms years ago with T&G engineered wood.
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On Friday, August 12, 2016 at 4:23:09 PM UTC-5, Jud wrote:

a concrete slab. That would have helped IMMENSELY.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca posted for all of us...

Geez, you are sorta anal about doing things correctly...
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wrote:

it's too late to put in the screws.. Mine had the additional "feature" of the floor joistd not meeting on the steel beam, but overlapping at the beam under where the living room and dining room meet. - a heavy weight in the middle of the dining room caused the cantileveered end to go up in the livingroom, and vise versa. Screwing the plywood subfloor solidly to both sets of joists helped solve that problem too - along with screwing the joists firmly together where the met and overlapped. Actually it wasn't 100 lbs - I got an extra zero in there by accident..
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"Jud" wrote
| Are there any other reasons to not glue down C&L?
It needs to float because of expansion. The whole floor expands and contracts as a unit. (And it needs space around the edges for that, under the baseboard.) There shouldn't be a problem if you put the right pad under it.
T&G needs to be nailed. Each board expands separately. You put down rosin paper rather than a foma pad. The biggest difference is that CL is veneer on plywood. It lasts only as long as the finish, making it a disposable floor. T&G, whether pre-finished or not, is solid wood. When the finish wears off you can have it sanded and refinished. It's more work and more money, and you'd need to rent a nailer, but you get a better floor.
If done right, neither should squeak. But you do have to make sure the subfloor is solid and stable.
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On Fri, 12 Aug 2016 16:34:58 -0400, "Mayayana"

This reply best answers my concerns. So I think I really need to go with T&G.
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On Fri, 12 Aug 2016 16:34:58 -0400, "Mayayana"

You can buy engineered hardwood in click or T&G, and some engineered has a pretty good top ply which CAN be sanded at least once (with care)

SOLID

that determines the construction - just as you can buy engineered hardwood OR composite(laminate) flooring in click-lock - and in thicknesses from less than 4mm About 3/16") to 15mm or more.(about 5/8") The slick laminate in my basement is 15mm. The hardwood in my living/dining room is 5/8" elm, and the upstairs bedrooms 3/8" oak.

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| You can buy engineered hardwood in click or T&G, and some engineered | has a pretty good top ply which CAN be sanded at least once (with | care)
Why bother? And how about if we call it was it is? It's plywood veneer flooring. "Engineered hardwood" is somewhere between farfetched marketing and downright lying. There's no reason to use such a scam term just because the flooring companies use it.
I misunderstood Jud's first post. I thought he was comparing CL plywood flooring to prefinished solid wood flooring. It turns out that he seems to be comparing CL plywood to glued plywood, but mistakenly thinks the glued type gets glued to the floor. I think part of the problem here is that he doesn't know the different products and is just trying to be a smart shopper before he calls contractors.
I'm amazed by how many people think they can know better than the contractor by doing a little reading and asking questions online. It makes me sympathetic toward the doctors who complain about patients coming in and saying, "I need you to prescribe XYZ for me, Doc."
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On Fri, 12 Aug 2016 19:19:40 -0400, "Mayayana"

I did speak to a flooring company first and they said $8-10 per square foot, which seems high. HD and Lowes have cheaper options, and I did speak to a person there, but they didn't seem to know much.
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On 8/12/2016 2:23 PM, Jud wrote:

Glue down or glue together? It may be good enough to put glue at the joint and still have a floating floor with a pad under it. Tongue and groove works well like that but i have no experience with C lock
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Thank you for everyone who replied.
I went back to the store and held a piece of T&G and a piece of CL. I had thought that these were basically the same except for how they connect. But the CL is really thin, light-weight, cheap stuff. Now I am sure that CL is NOT what I want!
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engineered harswood is 12 or 12.5 MM - some suppliers MAY be as heavy as 13mm . That's half an inch compared to 7/16 click.
A lot of laminate clic is only 6mm or less - I've never seen an engineered hardwod anywhere neer that thin.
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