glue that is not toxic in mouth?

I have a plastic retainer for 3 weeks and it cracked today when I was removing it -- I used a little bit more force than I needed.
The crack is at the front down the middle. It would cost > $100 to get a new one. Is there any type of glue I can use that is harmless inside the mouth when dried?
The retainer still feel ok even with this crack. However, if I don't fix the crack, it would probably get longer and eventually the retainer would break into two.
I cannot afford to keep buying $100 retainer every month for the rest of my life, so I'd like to learn how to repair them.
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peter wrote:

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Chuck B. wrote:

This from the JB Weld web site: Q: Is J-B Weld toxic? A: No. J-B Weld is non-toxic. However, we do not recommend consuming the product.
That's good to know - don't eat it! ;)
The two components are individually mildly toxic, but the cured product seems okay. Obviously, as with any two component product, thorough mixing is essential for complete curing. Particularly important in the OPs situation.
R
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Assuming the same material it was made with to begin with will also act as a glue, that would likely be the best material.
Does your dentist make these things himself or does he send it to a lab? I believe when I wore a retainer he made it himself. It seems reasonable to me for him or his assistant to repair it. It doesn't take the skill to make it that it does to repair it. The asst. can use the same material he used in the first place, and apply a thin layer over the crack and the area around it.
If you think this might happen again, he can sell you a bag of the stuff (a powder?) at cost*** and the tech can show you how to mix it.
***That is a good question. $40? 100? How big is the bag? Buy half a bag. Bring your own high quality ziplock.
If it is done at a lab, he can tell you where the lab is and he can ask them to fix yours or sell you a bag of the stuff and show you how to mix the stuff.
None of this will make you a dentist or a dental lab. They don't have to worry about your competing with them.
When I was a kid, I put up with crap from my orthodontist. On only one occasion but it still burns me when I think of it. Unless you can't stick new stuff to old stuff, there's no reason he can't do this for you.

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I'd use super glue. They use it to glue cuts together instead of stiches, so I definitely wouldn't mind the dried product in my mouth. Whatever you use, you'll probably want some ultra-fine (like auto finishing, 600+ grit) sandpaper to smooth out your repair - the tongue is very sensitive to rough areas - I remember from my own retainer. Good luck, Andy
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No, they don't use ordinary methyl CA glue for sutures. The surgical glue is a non-methyl version of CA. Costs more so not a consumer item except as the hideously priced OTC suture kit.
The methyl radical in the ordinary Super Glue is quite irritating to skin, and toxic in large amounts, during curing.
But IF well-cured, epoxy or CA glue would be fine and appropriate for this application.
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Years ago I read an article in the WSJ that surgeons were using Super Glue because the medical version was absurdly expensive. Didn't mention any irritation.
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irritation.
Agree with both of you - had heard that the consumer methyl version can be irritating to the skin, but how many people glue their fingers together with the stuff? I don't think the main issue in those cases is whether it's irritating to the skin. Had also heard that it is possible and not dangerous to use regular super glue instead of stitches. Finally, I did specify that I wouldn't mind the dried (polymerized, cured) product in my mouth, and I'll stick by that (no pun intended...). Andy
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

The stuff is highly irritating to raw/cut skin. I've accidentially got it in small cuts while making repairs to various things about the house. It burns quite a bit....
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replying to timbirr, Frank A. Rizo wrote: I have used Super Glue on cracks on my feet and hands, at the suggestion of doctors and nurses, to seal the lesions and, therefore, stop the pain. I have had no problem with skinnirritation, but, rather, the opposite: the pain stopped andvthe cracks healed shut. Also, being rather clumsy, I have glued fingers together,, with no ill effects.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

it is not bonding the two surfaces that meet each other. I would use it as long as doesn't present a danger of breaking in the mouth. Wouldn't hurt to call the lab that made it to see if they can repair the crack. It should not have cracked in removing it from your mouth; I would whine a lot to get a replacement.
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wrote:

Thin CA will wick into the crack.(and bond)

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Jim Yanik
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote in

I use ordinary CA glue on cuts,like annoying paper cuts;it's waterproof,no pesky band-aid,and eventually wears off.It may sting,but works well.
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Jim Yanik wrote:

in the dry Chicago winters. These occur at the nail corners. CA glue is the best thing I've found. I use a very small amount on a toothpick and press the crack together. It eventually heals. But most important, the irritation from the crack itself goes away after a minute after applying the glue. Yes, the glue does cause a little pinching when you first apply it, however, it is nothing like the contant irritation from the crack itself.
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replying to mm, TheHygieneQueen wrote: How did that work out for you? Did you get lessons for home dentistry from your dentist (a doctor)? If so he should lose his license.
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Cyanoacrylic glue("super glue").Use a good quality grade,not the cheapo stuff found at most stores. Hobby shops will have good CA glue.
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