Give me a Clue for a Flue?

Hello All,
Have a question, I hired an inspector to go over a house that we ended up buying. The inspector checked the fireplace in the living room and noted (after looking up the flue with a flashlight and mirror) that due to the flue design and or material it was meant only for fires using Duraflame type logs. I was told not to burn real wood fires as it would be too hot.
I have found info on the net about flues for wood fires and gas, but have never seen a distinction just for manmade logs. Any ideas as to why the inspector would say that or what should I look for up in the chimney that gave him that clue.
Thanks for any advice and or help, Steve
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inspection for fun, laughs and profit?!
There was obviously a flaw with the chimney. I wouldn't burn anything there until it's certified by someone who knows for a real fire. That means a full chimney inspection.
C'mon! Home inspectors are the quintessential matchbook cover home study, take your chances graduates!
Learn what you can from them, but never stake anything important on their say-so. Kinda like advice from this group, but more expensive.
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Hello, Steve
As a real estate broker I have gone through many home inspections with certified home inspectors. And as a homeowner, I have had home/s I have sold inspected for the buyers.
The quality and character of a home inspector varies, as does a building contractor or garage repairman. There are well-qualified, and poorly qualified inspectors. There are reputable ones and irreputable ones. Most serve a very good purpose - they have more knowledge than most people buying homes, and inspect things most buyers wouldn't even think to check. They are far less expensive than paying different contractors (HVAC, plumbers, electricians, brick & mortar specialists, etc.) to inspect all the various features of your new home - especially since your home is probably the most expensive investment you will ever make. They can bring attention to possible areas of concern (remember they have general knowledge) - take those items in question and then go to the specialist.
Now to your specific situation - your home inspector may or may not be right, but the chimney is not a place to try to become your own specialist on the cuff. Have the chimney inspected by a qualified fireplace/chimney contractor. At the very least, your chimney may need to be cleaned (build-up of creosote from wood that may have been burned can cause a fire in the chimney - a far more costly possibility.
You did very well to have a home inspection. Whether the home inspector is right or wrong, paying a contractor to have that verified will be money well spent. Better to spend a little than risk you, your family and your home.
Best wishes and enjoy your new home! Karen
PS - Happy Veterans Day to all our Veterans! November 11, 2003
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