gfci amps.

I have several gfci receptacles that do not work and I want to replace them. How do I know what amperage the exisiting receptacles are?
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On Mon, 30 Jan 2006 09:57:31 -0500, "HARRY BUCKLEY"

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On Mon, 30 Jan 2006 20:49:17 -0500, gfretwell wrote:

This is the correct answer. Most GFCIs are rated as above.
Most outlets on 20A circuits are only capable of 15A. Code only requires 20A recepticals on 20 circuits in a few circumstances (the only outlet on a 20A circuit). GFCIs don't pose any exception to this.
--
Keith


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A GFCI with 15A receptacle is likely to be capable of 20A (considering feedthru).
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
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On Tue, 31 Jan 2006 14:15:23 -0600, Mark Lloyd wrote:

Which is pretty much what I said.
--
Keith

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Pretty much, with a little clarification.
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Mark Lloyd
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If both prongs on a single outlet are vertical it's a 15a < ( | | ) >. If 1 prong is vertical and the other is a combination of vertical and horizontal, only goes half way from vertical (-| | ) then it's a 20a.
Here's a good link to show you what they look like. http://www.middleatlantic.com/power/ps.htm
-Brian
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Does this apply to GFCI outlets? The link seems to refer to "Outlets" in power strips.
The GFCI duplex outlet in my recently remodeled bathroom has a 20 amp circuit breaker homerun circuit. The prongs are simply two verticals, just like any other non-GFCI receptacle.
Vince Long Island, in NY
wrote:

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US code permits the installation of that pattern outlet on 20A circuits. Doesn't matter whether it's GFCI or not.
It's legal for it to "live on" 20A circuits and "pass thru" 20A to other outlets. Just not plugging in a 20A device.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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Vince wrote:

20A in any use - regular receptacle, GFCI, power strip ... Your GFCI is 15A. If you have a device drawing more than 15A it will have a 20A plug which will not plug into your GFCI.
A duplex 15A receptacle, while each individual receptacle is only rated 15A, a total of 20A can be drawn from both of them. That is why they can be, and often are, used on a 20A circuit.
A 15A or 20A plug can be plugged into a 20A receptacle. Thus on a 20A circuit there is some advantage to using a 20A receptacle, but there aren't a lot of devices with a 20A plug.
bud--

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HARRY BUCKLEY wrote:

Go to your breaker panel and find the circuit breaker that turns them off. Match the value of that circuit breaker. Also buy a $10 outlet tester at Lowes to make sure a GFCI is wired correctly and is working.
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