Getting Cold In Here

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My furnace is not responding to the thermostat. The pilot light is on, the breaker is on, the power switch is on. Have I missed something simple to check before calling a service tech ?
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Most HVAC units have a safety switch that does not allow the unit to run if the access panels are open. Does not matter if the doors are wide open or just ajar. I had that happen to me, so I took some duct tape with me, pushed in the doors until a click was heard and the unit started. Then I held the doors closed with several lengths of the tape.
On Thu, 21 Sep 2006 21:53:10 -0500, "fuzzy57"

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Use a volt meter to be sure you have power at the furnace, check the thermostat again to be sure its calling heat.
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some mechanical thermostats have a separate off switch lever at bottom. or pull off thermostat cover and look for insect problem. if you have a simple 2-wire thermostat: disconnect thermostat's 2 wires and measure 24 volts ac on the wires. the thermostat connects the 2 wires when it calls for heat.
fuzzy57 wrote:

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On Thu, 21 Sep 2006 21:53:10 -0500, "fuzzy57"

Is there a switch that is still set to AIR CONDITIONING? Be sure to flip it to HEAT. You can always take the thermostat off the wall and touch the two wires together. (no you wont get a shock from 24 volts). Of course if you have more than 2 wires (some do), I am not sure what to say.
One other thing. Next to the furnace is likely a switch. Is it on? Is the breaker on that feeds the furnace?
Mark
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On Fri, 22 Sep 2006 01:02:50 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote:

If there are 5 connect them all together. Let God sort them out.
I think I heard this advice in a war movie, probably during the heating and air conditioning scene.

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fuzzy57 wrote:

Sometimes there is an emergency cutoff switch on the wall near the furnace.
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fuzzy57 wrote:

If you have never worked on OR understand how a gas furnance works, call for service before you blow yourself up. It amy cost you a few bucks, but the peace of mind knowing that it was fixed properly is priceless......
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

asked the question here because he/she cannot afford an unnecessary service call.
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Stubby wrote:

Well, I suppose if he/she blows up, then I guess they don't have to worry about the heat. NO excuse.....You don't put yourself or others in danger because you can't afford a service call. And if he/she doesn't understand what they are doing then how would they know if the service call is unnecessary?
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Oh stop being a worrying nanny. There are things that can be done by any homeowner before calling the service tech. Heating appliances have all sorts of safety devices built in to them. Checking contacts, thermostats and switches will not cause the main gas valve to open accidentally or to blow up anything. Rather than stop others, educate yourself and put your fears to rest.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Ya listen to you. You've probably screwed up a number of things in your house and others. The point is, if you don't understand how it works, leave it alone and call someone who does.
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Yes, you should listen to me. Have I ever screwed up something? Yes, of course. But I've learned hot to fix many things a low or no cost and have saved thousands of dollars over the years. Every project is a learning experience. Any wiring I've done has been inspected and approved. Any plumbing I've done has been inspected and approved.
There are many things I don't understand, but I take a little time, follow the wires, follow the pipes, and find solutions to problems. I make a pretty good living at finding solutions to problems. Perhaps you have a life as a pencil pusher in an office and have no uderstanding of things mechanical. That is OK, we all don't want to learn everything, but don't admonish others that do want to learn.
After sitting for the summer, many a solenoid valve will stick. A tap of a hammer can save a $150 service call. Thee is nothing unsafe about that. Checking hte batteries of a thermostat is not unsafe. Checking the position of switches is not unsafe. I did not recommend that pipes be opened up.
Educate yourself. You can save a lot of money.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

I've built and fixed more things in a week then you'll see in a life time......Sonny. I've watched many people play with gas only to screw it up and cost themselves more money. Most of the time the money ends up in my pocket. I agree that there are plenty of people out there that can fix many things, but when it comes to something of this nature, leave to the Pros......I'm sure some day I'll read about you!!!
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On 22 Sep 2006 12:30:43 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

But you threatened Fuzzy with blowing up his house. Now you're just talking about money. If Fuzzy does waste some money the first time, that might be the prelude to saving money next time and ever after.
Anyhow, Fuzzy should know his skills, aptitude, and limitations, and decide for himself. It's not like you think you are stopping others from giving him leads to follow. He should know which ones he can do and which he can't.

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wrote:

I was working on that AC last Sunday, and my friend started complaining that before the furnace fan worked and now it didn't.
I may have touched the wrong two wires together and blown a fuse in teh furnace. They cost a quarter and there was a spare taped inside the furnace by the manufacturer.
Before we found the problem, I said, Don't worry, when it's fixed, everything will work.
That's sort of obvious because otherwise it woudn't have been fixed. But the upshot is that after another 15 minutes, I was 10 minutes away from saying it was the contactor. I have a spare I stripped out of a discarded compressor, and he'll be fixed in another 20 minutes.
I've never diagnosed this part before, and like you say, every project is a learning experience.
I divide my amateur days from my skilled amateur days, not so much because I make fewer mistakes, but because I always have a way to get out of it now when I do make a mistake.
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On 22 Sep 2006 10:34:59 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Let me guess..... The last time you tried to do a home repair, you tried to paint a wall, spilled the paint on your couch and tv, and broke a window when the defective ladder broke, you fell 3 feet, broke your spine and spent the next 5 years in traction. Plus when the paint brush hit you in the head you got a brain concussion. Now, you are in too much pain, dont have a couch or a tv to watch, so all you can do is sit in front of your computer posting scarey messages to people trying to do their own repairs. I guess you never understood how a ladder or bucket of paint works, so you should have left them alone.
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wrote:

Yep, more likely to get electrocuted than blown up.
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He's working with 24 volts to the thermostat. You cant even get an effective shock on 24V much less electrocuted.
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On Sat, 23 Sep 2006 08:26:40 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote:

I suspect that somebody is going to educate you about current, after a comment like that...
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