GE Microwave Won't Heat

I have a 21 year-old GE microwave in a hi-lo range (model JHP60G002) that has an intermittent problem. Everything seems OK, but it won't heat the food. The blower runs, light comes on, and the keypad/display seems normal.
The problem is also intermittent. It will work for weeks at a time, then be broken for weeks at a time.
I tried reseating the two main connectors on the Power Module board (WB27X5315 according to the GE parts web site), but that didn't help. That board is still available. Do you think it's worth spending $85 to replace that board? Exactly what does it do?
Is there anything else that could cause the problem? I asked a GE tech about it while he was repairing something else in the range, and he wasn't too helpful. I'm hoping someone here could be of more help.
Bob
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You can buy a new mw for $42 with more features than what you have now. You can buy an 1100 watt mw for $69. IMO, it is dumb to spend that much money on very old technology when you can get newer, cheaper.
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wrote in message

Of the few I have fixed (and be very careful there is upwards of several thousand volts that can kill you, let alone the microwave radiation that may cause cancer etc.) have mostly been defective magnetrons. Personally if it appears to go through the motions but does not heat up I doubt that the board is the reason. Other technicians may dispute but in my case the magnetron has been more often the problem, than other internal components. The cheapest 'used' magnetron I've been able to get hold of; there are different sizes and types, they are not all similar, has been $35 to $50 dollars. New they cost as much or more than a new microwave; so the unit is probably not worth repairing, especially with the risks involved to the unwary. Today, for example, saw a perfectly usable m.wave for 59.95 Canadian (roughly $50 US), brand new in a hardware store. Most m.waves these days are used intermittently for reheating etc. for a few minutes. Very few of the features are really needed and most are rarely used! used ones in good working condition typically fetch $15 to $30 at used stores and are bought by students for their lodgings or dorms. While they typically use one kilowatt of welectricity it is only for few minutes at a time! I would strongly recomend that since you are dealing with a 21 year old, what is essentially a '500 to 1000 watt microve radio transmitter in a metal box', don't work on it unless you are an electronically proficient transmitter technician! Radios have been transmitting around the world on far less power than that for the last almost 100 years! For comparison btw, your cell phone probably puts about less than one watt! And even though it's close to your head that won't kill or even burn you. Do not stand near m.wave, or let children do so. especially if it's operating out of the case, make sure the RF interlocks and that the metal case refit perfectly afterwards. One of those little 'Radiation Testers' to test for leakage around the door etc. is a good investment; about $15 at RS. If you dump it cut the AC cord off for safety. Retired technician.
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wrote:

I don't think it's the magnetron, as it works for weeks or even months at a time. For example, it's been working for the past year.

0.2 W for CDMA, 0.6 W for analog. But they operate on entirely different frequencies, so you really can't make meaningful comparisons of the power levels.
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Yeah, I hear what you're saying. But it would be nice to be able to use the microwave which is already there, built-in.
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