Garage spring broken

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Richard says: "It may be news to you, but products fabricated "simply" (cut, bent, twisted, etc) from standard steel shapes and alloys tend to cost a small proportion over the steel itself, in a good market."
Richard, It may be news to you, but springs are not simply fabricated. They cost is not in proportion to the materials price but the machinery to wind the coils, the labor to run the machinery, the cost of heat treating the finished coils, the overhead for the building to house the machinery and store the product. Throw in shipping costs, then the markup to the distributors and then the markup to me because I'm too stupid to buy a length of bulk wire and do the above myself. It's not an easy thing to make a small spring from say, .010 wire. Let alone trying to make a torsion spring from .250 or bigger wire, can you say "don't try this at home". The next time you run into those $5 springs, pickme up a couple and I'll give you $10 plus shipping.
CR

torsion
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CR writes:

Torsion springs are wholesaled by weight, and the price tracks the steel market, just like structural steel. I agree, I'm not gonna smelt ore and forge I-beams in my workshop, any more than torsion springs. But anybody paying $55 for a few pounds of curled-up ASTM A229 wire is paying convenience-store prices. I'll continue to get mine drop-shipped from the mill.
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As others have said, it may be best to have it hired out.
On a side, I replaced two panels of a 14' X 14' commercial door myself a few years ago. I consider myself a tad more than handy with tools so it did not seem like a big deal. In the end it was not a problem, but the cautions of the job being a bit dangerous are true. Standing on an extension ladder,12 feet in the air, unwinding the springs was an adventure! For me, the funny part was when I was looking for the replacement panels, a garage door company told me that I could not do it myself! Comments like that just make me more determined! I ended up finding two used panels from someone that drove a truck through their overhead door. Greg
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On 25 Dec 2004 23:53:02 GMT, Ignoramus11573
<snip>

A garage-door mechanic will replace BOTH springs (as it should be done) for about $200.

No. The garage door mechanic will have the correct spring.

The garage door mechanic uses two round metal bars, perhaps 24" long.

Safe for a garage door mechanic. Not safe for the typical home owner.

Yes.

Supposedly most of these are made at the same place.

Call a pro. I know someone who got his thumb torn off messing with a garage-door spring. He is lucky to be alive.

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Phisherman writes:

Should be less than that.

Not necessarily.

The standard winding bar for residential doors is 1/2" mild steel, 18" long.

Over 1000 correspondents happily tell me they did it themselves.

No, he got hurt by ignorance of proper technique.
I have spent years trying to sort through the friend-of-a-friend horror tales to get to the truth of injuries from torsion springs. I have collected a few reliable first-hand accounts of injuries. The cause seems to be simply not having the simplest of tools and techniques.
Typically, someone is hurt because he loosens the cone setscrews without knowing to engage a winding bar first.

There is a wide variation in service life. Price has little to do with it. See my page:
http://www.truetex.com/garage.htm
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