Garage spring broken

Page 2 of 3  
I would add that I almost lost my head doing it myself. No joking.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You guys are backwards. If the door is all the way UP, then the tension is mostly relieved. Sometimes you can pull the rope to disconnect the opener, then push the door back far enough to get in the space between door & wall. Use 2 C-clamps on the rails to hold the door in the up position. Then change the springs, put about one turn on them and then hook the cables to the door with the cable wound all the way around the 2 drums. Saves a LOT of spring-winding

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
assuming you can get to them with the door up..
randy

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yes, generally the door is in the way of doing it.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
See my page:
http://www.truetex.com/garage.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You, sir, are the reason I decided to try doing it myself. Indeed, it can be dangerous, and your commentary was excellent. I'm glad you're still around here so that I could thank you.
Now, indeed, this is really crappy weather to be learning how to do it, and it would probably be more appropriate to have it done by a pro, but your commentary would also help someone that is having it done keep from getting screwed.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Excellent write up!!
Replacement of a torsion spring isn't that dangerous if you're careful and know what you're doing.
On Sun, 26 Dec 2004 00:55:17 -0600, Richard J Kinch

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Same thing goes for operating a table saw, driving a car, installing a window, etc. They're all dangerous, but it really gets tiresome hearing about how the homeowner should never consider trying to learn. Instead, they have some knuckle-dragger come out and install the spring that he has on the truck, instead of the right one
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
No all springs are not the same & the two on your door may or may not be the same wire size & length so you have to measure both of them (unwound)
If you don't know what you are doing it can be very unsafe. Equipped w/ the right tools (mainly proper bars) & knowledge it still can be risky but manageable, but it's not something I recommend that the average homeowner attempt to do.
We normally recommend changing both springs at the same time since they are under the same amount of tension & will usually fatigue at the same rate. However, if the two springs are of a different wire size one may last longer then the other, but the average life cycle is 7-8 years.
The quaility of the spring material is pretty much the same but the galvanized steel springs that some are starting to use is expected to last longer then the non-galvanized. However the wire size & length of the spring determines it's life cycle for the proper amount of turns. Springs are rated by IPPT (inch pounds per turn or lifting force) & the larger the wire size, the longer the spring will be for the same IPPT, & hence the longer the spring will last. Doordoc www.DoorsAndOpeners.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Really, it's not worth your time. As already stated, you will not save that much money. I had mine done by a reputable local company for $35 more than I could buy the springs for. When he was done he lubricated the door and spent almost as much time adjusting the door and the opener as it took him to install the springs. The door had never worked as well since I owned the house. Money well spent.
DIY is good, but sometimes it is a fools folly. I just built a 500sqft addition on my home. I went out and priced the insulation and was not looking forward to that part of the job. So much so that I thought that I would check with insulation contractors to see if the extra money would be worth me not having to itch for a week afterwards. After calling around I got the entire thing done for $100 LESS than I could have done it for. Sometime it's smart to have someone else do the job if that's what they do for a living. I like being frugal (read cheap), but not stupid.
CR

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yep, same here, only the item was carpeting. Got the same carpet, with pad, installed for almost the same price of me getting it, having it delivered, and installing it myself.
But it is worth the homeowner's time to learn how to do it, so they are more diligent about watching for hangups in the track, poor lubrication, etc. Speaking of lubrication, a lot of folks grease the rails. But that just causes dirt and other debris that the door collects to be deposited in the rail. Causing problems. If a person can get a good deal, it's far better to have it done. Instead of agonizing over it, and having to learn everything at once.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Besides al the good points that you made, this is not the kind of job that I would even enjoy. Boring as hell, inconvenient, cold, dark, no thanks.
i
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Good choice. Knowing how to change oil doesn't mean that you have to be the one to do it.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I understand you in the figurative sense, but actually, I prefer changing oil in my pickup myself. It takes less time than getting to the oil change place, not to say about waiting in line and waiting for the job to be done.
i

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
CR writes:

It depends. Doing it on one door, one time is not worth learning unless you just like to learn things. That's the learning curve, but that has changed to favor DIY with the innovation of ready information on the Internet.
If you have a lot of doors, or expect to have them over some multiple of their spring lifetimes (about 7 years), then you'll save plenty. With a three-door garage over a lifetime of home-ownership, I expect to save $1000s.
I can now repair my garage door springs faster than I can shop for a service call and nurse that task along. And I know it is done right.
And you may just save plenty learning simply knowing how its done. I've gotten plenty of stories from those who have paid as much as $800 for a job that should cost $100 or $150.

Eh? Either the spring were overpriced, or the service was underpriced, likely the former.
If you priced uninstalled springs from a door dealer, you got either "we don't sell springs", or a ridiculously high price. They're not really in that retail business, and they want you to believe that you can have a service call and installation for only $35.

Well, then it didn't work right before the spring broke, and if you knew how to evaluate and adjust them, you could have had it working well all along. Another benefit learning this yourself.
You'll also have the skills to replace the entire door, if that should ever become necessary. That's also going to save me a bundle on my aging, 25-year-old doors.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have done both torsion and extension spring replacements on garage doors. The last time one broke I called around to get a price on the torsion springs and if memory serves me they were $55 a piece. I have seen them on the internet for maybe $45. I was busy and didn't really have time to do it so I called the guys who do it for a living and the whole job was done for $135 plus tax. Over priced springs, maybe. Under priced service, maybe but the company has been in business for 35 yrs. They must do something right. Yes, they make money on the springs. They buy them by the truck load for cheap. Having the job done by someone else even if it cost you $50 more would take a long time to save $1000's. It really is not that difficult a job but a slight botch may result in injury.
Hell, I'm not saying don't DIY. But what is your time worth? CR

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My time is worth a lot if the job is unpleasant. My time is worth more or less nothing if I like what I am doing (such as fixing my generator).
Knowing myself, I would pay a lot more if I had to, to avoid injury which would be too probable in this instance.
Unfortunately, even some unpleasant jobs are better done by myself, due to large amount of time needed to select and hire and wait for contractrs.
i
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
CR writes:

It's just a coil of ASTM A229 steel wire. The market price per pound is about that of steel rebar. What does 5 or 10 pounds of that cost at a retailer? About 1/10 of what you're paying.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Doha! I should have thought of that. Just go out and buy10 lbs of A229 oil tempered wire and bring it home. Then I just cinch a pipe down in my vise and wind my own torsion springs around it and install them on my garage door. Think of the savings. Maybe I should just get rebar because it is a lot easier to bend and would be less trouble. ......Wait a minute, what about a bungee cord, yea that's the ticket.
CR
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
CR writes:

It may be news to you, but products fabricated "simply" (cut, bent, twisted, etc) from standard steel shapes and alloys tend to cost a small proportion over the steel itself, in a good market. If Home Depot sold torsion springs like they sold rebar (they won't), they would sell for about the same $/lb.
So the DIY problem reduces to finding ready retail sources that approach this market efficiency. Otherwise you pay $55 to a snickering dealer who bought it for $5.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.