Fluorescent Light Fixture

I want to put some fluorescent lights in my barn. I would like to turn them on/off individually with a pull switch and also direct ire them. All the fixtures with the pull switch on them have a cord and plug attached. My question is, can I take off the cord and direct wire these fixtures? Will the fixtures that operate at 0 degrees be OK? I heat the barn when I am in it.
Thanks Mike
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Take advantage of the cord and install outlet covers on the boxes that will feed the lights. A barn environment is pretty rough on lamps, so it will be easier to unplug and replace after failure than to unwire and do so. Don't know for sure, but there may be code requirements for barn lamps that are hard wired.
Joe
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On 12/3/2011 4:37 PM, c1gmlm wrote:

You could remove the cords and hard wire them, or install an outlet at each location and plug them in, which makes it easier to replace when they go bad. 0 degree ballasts are great for cold locations
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Use an enclosed fixture with a ballast that starts the lamps at low temperatures.
Fixtures can be hard wired or plugged in and you can individually switch them, but you may have to add the switch yourself.
Here's an example of a suitable fixture and it is rated for 0 degrees. http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/LITHONIA-Wet-Location-Fixture-3YA23?cm_sp=EN-_-L2-_-MostPopular&cm_vcÿMP
Lighting fixtures must be grounded as a general electrical requirement; but with fluorescent fixtures there's another reason -- for reliable starting, linear fluorescent lamps must be within a half inch of grounded metal.
Tomsic
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Should be able to pull the wire out, and connect the romex, BX, or THNN where the power cord came off. Outdoor 0F fixtures should be fine. Probably safer, if you direct wire them. But, the plug and socket (and hang the lamps by chains) makes them temporary, and you can take them to your next barn. Or replace them easy enough when they stop working. If you direct wire them, you make more work for replacing the fixtures.

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On 12/3/2011 3:37 PM, c1gmlm wrote:

RBM mentioned 0 degree ballasts because most florescent lights have problems when the temperature is below 40°F. A better bet would be to spend a little more money and get some HO florescent fixtures and lamps. The HO lights will come on in very cold temps and put out a lot more light. I would also suggest installing the clear protective plastic sleeves on the tubes since it's in a barn and could be struck by something. An example from WW Grainger:
http://preview.tinyurl.com/cszm93k
From 1000bulbs.com:
http://www.1000bulbs.com/product/332/PLAS-100300.html
One thing to note, the T12 lamps are going away in favor of the smaller diameter T8 lamps and I have yet to install any T8 HO fixtures so I don't know how they perform.
http://www.1000bulbs.com/category/t8-high-output-linear-fluorescent-tubes /
http://preview.tinyurl.com/7wlwqxq
TDD
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