Flickering TV

I have a ten year old JVC 27" TV that has begun to flicker. The picture flickers intermittently, and when the set is bumped or moved slightly. The flickering happen on all inputs (cable, video 1, video 2, S-video). I am going to replace it, as it is our main set used for everyday viewing. My question is: is there a quick fix for the problem? The reason I ask is because I would like to keep it, if possible, for use in the garage or a spare bedroom. Any advice would be appreciated. The model# is AV-27BP3 I have searched the JVC site with no luck.
Thanks in advance,
Les
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gina and Les Armstrong wrote:

Hi, Unplug the set, wait for 10 minutes or more then open up the set, vacuum out the dust build up. Wiggle the CRT HV(anode) connector to reseat it. Tony
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks Tony. Is the connector the small circuit board that is connected to, what looks like, a small tube, that then connects to the back of the large tube (the back side of the actual TV screen)? I wiggled the small circuit board and it did feel tighter afterwards.
Les
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
message

I buttoned the set back up and turned it on. Guess what? No flickering! Thanks Tony!!
Les
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gina and Les Armstrong wrote:

Hi, That is the little thicker wire going to the belly of CRT. Wiggle at CRT end. It's clipped into a little hole on the glass envelope. Hope this helps. Tony
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Waiting won't make it any safer. The capacitors hold a charge indefiinately. Just be VERY carefull when the TV is open, it will pack a punch.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I used one hand and wore a heavy rubber glove when reaching inside. My Dad taught me to keep one hand in my pocket at all times (when possible) when working around electrical components. As an electrician for 30 years, he had his share of zaps, fortunately none were very serious.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gina and Les Armstrong wrote:

Hi, Good. Knit picking here, that one hand in pocket better be left hand for a reason. Tony, VE6CGX
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have been under the impression that all modern (past few decades) TV sets and other CRT-type devices have a very high value resistor connected to the high voltage sources so that residual charges are gradually dissipated when the set is turned off. Regardless, I always treat any set that I work on as if there is a lethal charge in there.
When I feel that it is necessary, I wear a rubber glove and use a very long, thin bladed screw driver with a good insulated handle. I own a variety of various length wires with alligator clips solder at both ends and I use a long one to electrically attach the screwdriver shaft to a reliable ground. I then slide the screwdriver tip under the CRT high voltage boot to discharge the CRT. It is probably not necessary on modern sets, but it doesn't take long to do. And, of course, I repeat the procedure after each time that I turn the set on for testing.
Caveat - don't work on CRT devices if you aren't very knowledgeable in what you are doing and don't trust newsgroup advise without carefully double-check the advise for accuracy.
Gideon
======================
Waiting won't make it any safer. The capacitors hold a charge indefiinately. Just be VERY carefull when the TV is open, it will pack a punch.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gina and Les Armstrong wrote:

There's likely a bad solder joint or loose or corroded connector. This TV is better built than current models and may have another 10 years of life left in it (my Japanese-made Sanyo celebrates its 29th birthday this year). If you can solder, you may be able to repair it almost for free. But before you try, read the excellent www.repairfaq.org , especially its safety information.
The high voltage connector on the side of the picture tube can retain a high voltage charge indefinitely, so you do not want to remove it. Just twisting around its rubber boot slightly will reseat the connector and clean off corrosion, but you can get a shock if the boot has even microscopic cracks in it, and I seriously doubt this connector is at fault. More likely any bad connection is on the small circuit board that plugs into the end of the picture tube because the tube's pins run hot enough to turn blue. But the board may be glued to the tube and not budge unless the glue is _carefully_ peeled or cut off. If you cut it, be very, very careful not to scratch the glass or the tube can suddenly implode and then explode, and Another possibility is cracked solder for the sockets that connect to the pins. The cracks can be very fine and invisible without strong light and a manifying glass. Other common locations of cracked solder are at heavy components, such as the flyback transformer (thick cable to side of picture tube emerges from it), or hot components, including devices connected to heatsinks.
Beware that broken glass can be a bigger hazard tha electric shock since a shock may merely cause you to jerk your hand, but your hand may then break the glass. Also TVs are very front heavy and prone to falling forward, so set any upright TV on a completely solid surface or place a large pillow in front to cushion its fall.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks to all you guys for the info. I was able to stop my 9-year old Sharp 27" TV from the jumping picture by applying your advice.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.