Flatten Ceiling

When my house was dormiered, the drywallers didn't get the drywall on the second floor hall ceiling flat. There is a bump along one wall that is noticable. Too late to rehang the drywall, so I'm thinking of filling the bump. I have a change of 1/2" over a 45" span. Zero to 1/2" and back to zero in 45". Out in the middle of the hall it won't be as noticable with the ceiling painted white, but on the edges near the crown molding I'm going to have to do something.
Do you think I can use drywall mud to build up the hollow? What should I do to make sure it stays up and in place.
Is there any better solution? At least one better than shooting the contractor, hahahaha.
Bernie
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That sounds more like a framing problem than the drywall guys fault. Assuming as you've described it the area is 'concave' and not convex, the rafters in that area must be 1/2" out of line with the others, or bowed. This would make sense because it they are 16" on center, two that are out of line would give you a 48" spam for your 'holow' area.
You can't push the drywall up on the lower ends can you? That would indicate the lower sides are not attached securely to the rafters. If this is the case, you'd be best to get it fixed correctly or you'll just have cracks and nail/screw pops later. If this is a recent job, get the contractor on the horn and insist it be fixed.
If you're out of warranty, and the entire ceiling seems securely fastened then your mud option is one option. However, depending on how good you are with the trowel, you might also consider removing the drywall from the high area, investigate why the problem occurred in the first place, and then repairing it. Perhaps adding a 1/2 shim tp the rafters that are higher.
Can you get at the area from above? Maybe you can pull back some insulation or something and see what things lool like from above before doing anything from below.
If you think the overall 'dip' isn't going to be noticeable except at the crown molding, try a peice of the molding and see if it has enough flex to 'bow' into the dip. If you are going to paint everything you may be able to fill any small voids with a paintable caulk, but I wouldn't try this on anything as large as 1/2".
Let us know how it goes!
Mark

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It's out of warranty and hasn't cracked or popped so I assume it'a a joist out of alignment. This hall is where old house mets new house. The remove and repair is the right way, but there are way too many complications that I don't want to deal with. Check in the attic is a good idea, I'll check it out this evening. At the very least I can verify what is wrong and maybe get a resolution.
Flexing the molding won't work because it's the joint of the two plane, horizontal and vertical that make the hump noticable. What should be a generally stright line has a bump. The molding would telegraph this same bump. Also it's 4 1/2" wide crown, so I don't think I'll be flexing it, hahahaha.
Worse case then it's mud. Maybe I'll embed some mesh tape to give the mud something to adhear to.
Thanks for your help!
Bernie

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Bernie Hunt wrote:

Why? That is the best solution.
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Because it's a hugh can of worms. The whole ceiling is also tilted about 1" over 10 feet. If I staft fixing one, then I really should fix them all and I don't really want to tear down all the molding, drop the ceiling and put it all back up again. If I can get rid of this dip, then I can hide all the other issues.

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Bernie Hunt wrote:

Get a plaster gargoyle/grotesque to mount in the corner of the wall/ceiling, to cover the mis-aligned join.
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Why is it the drywallers fault? They hang on what is there. Drywall is notorious for showing defects, plumb/square.
Dry wall mud is not intended to be that thick in most situations. I doubt that it would look right and for very long. What about a sheet of 1/4 inch drywall in 1/2 of the area mentioned, 22.5 inches. The mud will only be a 1/4" thick.
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Bernie Hunt wrote:

You could build the area up with successive layers of wire mesh and mud. Do the hog work yourself then get a pro to do the finish coats.
Probably regret it some day, cheap fixes have a bad habit of coming back to haunt you.
Have you considered covering the area with tongue and grove boards or some type of paneling. Sort of a feature wall idea but on the ceiling or the dormer area.
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wrote:

Go buy a keg of beer and some whiskey. Sit back, relax, and get drunk. You wont even care about the bump after that, and will save yourself lots of work for nothing. Nothing in life is perfect........
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