First try at posting photo link...

This (if it works) shows why underground service has lower voltage drop:
https://picasaweb.google.com/115498331124510478741/Feb102010?authkey=Gv1sRgCKvZ5enB-ILr_gE#5626020592703514674
Joe
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https://picasaweb.google.com/115498331124510478741/Feb102010?authkey=Gv1sRgCKvZ5enB-ILr_gE#5626020592703514674
When posting really long links, it's a good idea to visit one of the tiny URL sites and get one of these:
http://tinyurl.com/3w4vxcv
--
Dan Espen

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On 07/05/11 9:50 PM, snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net wrote:

I use tinyurl but I also post the original long url.
Some folks will not click on a tinyurl since there is no way to tell where it will take you.
At a minimum, you should offer the preview link available from tinyurl so users can decide for themselves if they want to follow the link.
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On 7/5/2011 9:50 PM, snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net wrote:

And even better. If you read one line down after you have it create a link:
"Or, give your recipients confidence with a preview TinyURL:
http://preview.tinyurl.com/abc123 "
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snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net wrote:

Why would that be a good idea?
If the original link is listed properly (i.e., surrounded by angle brackets) any good newsreader will interpret it properly.
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The ">"s inserted from quoting will eventually kill the link. At least that's my experience.
--
Dan Espen

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On 7/5/2011 8:16 PM, Joe wrote:

https://picasaweb.google.com/115498331124510478741/Feb102010?authkey=Gv1sRgCKvZ5enB-ILr_gE#5626020592703514674
All I see is two different size conductors.
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RBM, 7/5/2011,10:15:05 PM, wrote:

https://picasaweb.google.com/115498331124510478741/Feb102010?authkey=Gv1sRgCKvZ5enB-ILr_gE#5626020592703514674
The one on the right is thicker (more current, less voltage drop/resistance) and stranded (flexible).
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On 7/5/2011 11:43 PM, badgolferman wrote:

https://picasaweb.google.com/115498331124510478741/Feb102010?authkey=Gv1sRgCKvZ5enB-ILr_gE#5626020592703514674
I get the resistance thing. How does a picture of two different size wires, show why an underground service has lower voltage drop?
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On 7/6/2011 5:34 AM, RBM wrote:

Perhaps he was alluding to the fact or doesn't comprehend the fact that the overhead cable could be carrying 13.8 kV and the insulation on the underground cable looks to be a 600 volt cable that would be run in conduit. Of course overhead high voltage lines are often not insulated and depend on free air spacing for insulation. Out in The Pacific I ran a lot of 15 kV rated underground coaxial power cable with a semiconductor grounded shield. We were using it to run 4,160 volt power because the island was only 3 miles long. The Army Core of Engineers wanted the power cable to be a bit overrated because of the salt water. We used Ray-Chem heat shrink kits instead of the horrid multi-layer wraps like the old school chaps were doing for splices and connections. :-)
TDD
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