First fence post as a bench marker

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One side of my house is overlook an Alleway (cars can drive). I want to bui ld a fence similar to this one (click on the link below please)
http://tinypic.com/r/24n2yja/8
My house is in similar situation of the picture above (instead of the green , my house is there).
Of course the fence is going to be build on my property side. I want a prot ection fence like the one in the picture because I am afraid in the Winter cars might slip and hit my house.
I started working and dig to install the Posts. There will be 6-8 post and the distance between them is 6' feet. My question, should I install the fir st post (put the gravel first and then concorete) and then wait to dry and then try to install pther post so I can use the first one as a bench mark w hen I try to make sure they all post are layed on the same level and the hi ght are the same. I thought it is good idea to do that. What do you think
Thanks a lot.
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leza wang wrote:

I think you should drive a pair of pegs and stretch a string to establish your line . Use a level to plumb your posts , set 'em a bit high and cut to height after mounting the top stringer . Cut the tops at an angle to shed water or they'll rot . And your concrete needs to be finished slightly above ground and sloped away from the post for the same reason .
--
Snag



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On Tuesday, July 15, 2014 1:28:25 PM UTC-4, Terry Coombs wrote:

drive). I want > to build a fence similar to this one (click on the link be low please) > > http://tinypic.com/r/24n2yja/8My house is in similar s ituation of the picture above (instead of the > green, my house is there).

a protection fence like the one in the picture because I am afraid in > the Winter cars might slip and hit my house. > > I started working and dig to install the Posts. There will be 6-8 > post and the distance between them i s 6' feet. My question, should I > install the first post (put the gravel f irst and then concorete) and > then wait to dry and then try to install pth er post so I can use the > first one as a bench mark when I try to make sur e they all post are > layed on the same level and the hight are the same. I thought it is > good idea to do that. What do you think > > Thanks a lot.
I think you should drive a pair of pegs and stretch a string to establish y our line . Use a level to plumb your posts , set 'em a bit high and cut to height after mounting the top stringer . Cut the tops at an angle to shed w ater or they'll rot . And your concrete needs to be finished slightly above ground and sloped away from the post for the same reason . -- Snag

ould drive a pair of peges"?

post or more (like 1.5 f or 2 f)?
Thanks a lot.
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leza wang wrote:

Hi, Try You tube B4 starting.
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Tony Hwang wrote:

Hi, Another idea might be planting few Norwegian poplar trees. They grow so fast and they will act like traffic noise barrier as well.
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Tony Hwang wrote:

Hi, Leza It's OT, excuse me but how do you spell your name in Chinese? My Korean name is 黃登一, Where are you from in China or Taiwan?
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leza wang wrote:

Put a peg in the ground at each end of where you want your fence , and tie a string tightly between them . THis will establish a straight line to guide your pole placement . I use 8 foot treated 4x4 posts they're dead cheap - bury them a *minimum* of 24" deep , depending on the frost line in your area . -- Snag If what I posted is really that hard to understand , you should probably hire somebody to build your fence .
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On Tuesday, July 15, 2014 12:32:06 PM UTC-7, Terry Coombs wrote:

Better practice is to set the two end post and then stretch a string. You're gonna have to restretch the string using those two end posts anyhow.
Harry K
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Harry K wrote:

String at near the bottom, not top.
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On Tue, 15 Jul 2014 12:16:39 -0700 (PDT), leza wang

If you have snow and freezing temps, you want as much down as up. You need to get down below the frost line (which around hear, on a roadway, can be over 8 feet - no traffic areas 4 ft is generally safe)
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Harry K wrote:

Why ? If the posts are in a line and plumb , you set the top stringer with a level and use it as a guide to cut the posts to height . Don't make more work than necessary ! I do set the first board , then temp an end board to pull a string to line up my pickets . Harry , I did this kind of work <carpentry/home repair> for a living , and managed to learn a few tricks over the years .
--
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On Tuesday, July 15, 2014 2:03:16 PM UTC-7, Terry Coombs wrote:



Why? So you can GET THE POSTS IN A STRAIGHT LINE to begin with. End posts, string line, dig holes, set posts USING THE STRING to get them straight in a line.

Well, duh. Of course but since I never mentioned it...
I do set the first board , then temp an end board to

Thanks for the warning, If you don't know how to set posts in a line, I for sure won't be hiring you.
I'm 79 and set my first posts when I was about 8 and been doing it off and one ever since.
Harry K
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On Tue, 15 Jul 2014 16:58:56 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Here is Canada, but where in Canada?

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Harry K wrote:

Sweet Jesus Harry , READ WHAT I WROTE !
I use a peg at either end of the run to pull the string to establish my line . DID YOU GET IT THIS TIME ?
--
Snag
Go back and re-read my posts , I said that at least TWICE in my responses .
  Click to see the full signature.
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On Wednesday, July 16, 2014 10:38:38 AM UTC-7, Terry Coombs wrote:


.

No I don't. You could at least attempt to show how you are setting your lin e posts if you haven't set the end posts first. I do not know of, or seen ANYONE using pegs to set line posts. They set the end posts, wrap line aro und one, stretch to the other tightly and then set the line posts against t he string.
I currently have runs of over 300 ft with RR ties set every 9'. Sigth down the line and all you see is one post.
Harry K
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Harry K wrote:

Well goody goody for you . What does it matter if the guide string I'm using is tied to a peg or a post at either end ? If the string is tight , and the posts all touch it on one side , and you plumb them as you set , they're gonna be in a straight line - which is the objective isn't it ? The last fence I built was just over 80 feet , stepped down twice to follow the terrain , used round steel posts <customer's design> and is clad with rough cut cedar on both sides . Same as you , looking down the fence it's as straight as , well , a string . And when it was finished the customer gave me a 100 bucks bonus because it looked so good . Just because my way isn't your way doesn't make my way wrong ... perhaps you'd like to teach me how to lay out and cut the framing parts for a 3 radius reception desk too , while we're at it . And don't forget the contrasting veneer inlays ... Or maybe you'd like to school me in how to cut a round ball on a machine lathe ? No ? I know , I know , teach me how to TIG weld , that's pretty difficult . And you *do* owe me an apology .
--
Snag



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On Thursday, July 17, 2014 8:40:05 AM UTC-4, Terry Coombs wrote:

The only difference I see is that using the two end posts avoids the need to drive two separate pegs, so it's a little less work. On the other hand, the string separate from the end-posts has the advantage for situations where you want to see how the fence will run start to finish before choosing the exact end-point locations.
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On Thursday, July 17, 2014 5:40:05 AM UTC-7, Terry Coombs wrote:





The point you keep missing is that fooling around with pegs is unneccesary and extra work. Why anyone wouild do it is beyond me. Perhaps needed going over terrain changes but definitely not when both ends are visible.
Harry K
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Harry K wrote:

Ahh , but it's a more efficient use of my time to drive a couple of pegs and commence to settin' posts than to set a pair of posts , wait a day or two for concrete to set up and return to the job to set the rest . I've also used existing fencing to establish my end points and line , whatever works and every job is different . Time is money , and if I can set them all in one day instead of having to come back , I'm ahead .
--
Snag



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On Thursday, July 17, 2014 8:25:01 AM UTC-7, Terry Coombs wrote:

Yep. Never one solution for everything. And yes, I do apologize.
Harry K
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