Finishing a basement and want to paint walls BEFORE installing doors and trim


I'm finishing my basement and I've primed all of my walls. I was planning on completing the painting of the walls first - then painting doors and trim and installing them. I thought this would save time as I don't have to worry so much about masking everything and I can spray just about everything.
This seems to go against what I've seen done. What is the problem with my approach?
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I'd do it that way. Sure, you may have to do some touchup, but that is better than masking everything.
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unless the walls have a heavy texture, I'd advise against spraying, BTW, how are you planning to caulk and putty jambs, casing, and base, afterward or not at all? Most pros caulk, putty, prime, and paint trim first. then tape the trim off and roll the walls. the secret to taping is to let a small amount of wood show and caulk the crack, wiping the caulk with finger or wet rag, paint walls, then let dry overnight and pull the tape off. leaves a car stripe fine line, no seepage.
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (The hooligan) wrote in

Pros tape? I don't tape. No trim paint on walls. No wall paint on trim. None.
After caulking I do trim. Runs onto wall some. Feather out. Then do walls. Use 2" Wooster or Purdy angled sash brush. Run bead down about 1/4" away from trim. Then do where wall meets trim line. Steady single long strokes. Runing the first bead keeps the wall from from sucking all the paint off the brush for the final corner line.
Feather out all wall paint to prevent boardering. Roll walls.
Secret? If there is one it's try different things. Then do what works best for you. If it's taping, then so be it.
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snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

Only concern is scratching, nicking, rubbing paint finished wall surface by accident which needs touch up which will look odd.
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Works for me. It is easier to paint the trim and doors on a couple of sawhorses then masking and bending down on the floor. Wait a few days for the paint to dry fully before installing. You will still need to cover your nail holes and do some touch up, but since the paint is new matching is not much of a problem. I like the look of sprayed paint.
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snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote in

That is a good approach and is what we did in our new house construction. It is the most common approach on new house construction that I have seen - don't recall seeing any masked trim now that I think about it.
It will work great as long as you choose a type of paint that will look good sprayed. The only things we masked were the windows and exterior doors and that was easy because the trim was not on at the time so taping accuracy was not an issue.
There are low build and high build paint options. Use only high build, especially if you want to spray. The high build hides blemishes much better while the low build will show every little thing and it dries much quicker so over-spray edges are a real problem. I doubt that a decent job can be done with spraying low build - it should only be rolled.
I used high build paint in my new house for both primer and top coat. High build is much better for spraying than low build because it doesn't mist much. A breathing filter mask is required but not a fume rated mask. The low build is a bitch for misting and will require covering over all window surfaces and anything you don't want painted. In my opinion you couldn't do a decent job with low build. It would even mess up adjacent finished walls while you were working. In homes low build is only suitable for rolling - it is great for rolling because it goes on easier. Needs extra coats though.
Our painter recommended spraying the primer and rolling the top coat. It was a choice based on the fact that rolled on top coats are the norm around here. Sprayed and rolled look much different so looks are an important consideration. He said rolling high build was not an issue and saved extra coats in some rooms. He saved a lot of trouble by having the primer tinted at the same time as the top coats for every room.
Our painter and finishing carpenter collaborated on all the trim. The carpenter cut and fitted all pieces and the painter sprayed them in the basement or the garage depending on the weather. Then the carpenter did the final installation and the painter sealed the nail holes.
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Excellent advice! thank you!
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No problem. It's the fast way and it works fine. You'll have to touch up the woodwork after installing it, but it will look just fine.
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On Aug 5, 9:48pm, snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

I always stain and seal my trim before installing, its sure a lot easier than doing it on the walls. If you can do trim work without gouging the walls then thats the way to go to save a lot of time and work.
Personally I would NEVER hire a "professional" painter that does not mask all the woodwork either. If I dont see a perfectly straight cut in between the wall and the oak trim with NO paint on the wood I have them do it over with masking tape.
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