Fence Posts - Cement or No Cement??

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I see that some people debate over whether fence posts should be cemented into the ground or not. Some people say yes, you need cement to keep the fence sturdy, other people say putting the posts 2 feet down in soil or even crushed rock is perfectly fine.
Would it be okay to install 50 feet ( length ) of 4 to 5 foot high chainlink fence, and NOT have the posts cemented in??
We have a small backyard, only about 50 feet wide between houses. We have a small wooded area behind our house, and no backyard fence. Last year we tried to have a vegetable garden, but either deer, or raccoons or something ate all our vegetable plants!!! They loved eating the tomato and pumpkin plants. They ate everything right down to the stalk!!!!!
The local fence company wants $1,000 bucks to install a 6 foot high Cedar stockade fence along the 50 feet of property line. They want $700 for 50 feet of spruce. "Pressure treated posts", and the fence will be "nailed on". We don't have the extra money right now, so thinking of just putting up a chainlink fence with the metal chainlink fence posts. We would like to get either a wooden or PVC 6 foot high stockade fence in the future, so would like the chainlink to just be temporary, so that we can TRY to have a vegetable garden this year, and so we don't want to have to dig up heavy cemented posts in the future, when it's time to take the chainlink fence down.
So would it really be that bad to install 50 feet of chainlink fence and NOT cement the posts in the ground, and maybe just pack them down with dirt, 2 feet deep??
Thanks.
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On Apr 22, 5:19 pm, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (MICHELLE H.) wrote:

This is the best way to install fence posts, with a metal spike driven into the ground. Prevents rot for much longer than concrete and can be taken out (but not that easily). Also shorter posts can be used and quicker to install.
http://www.buyfencingdirect.co.uk/fencing-accessories/post-spikes-and-post- bases/110mm-post-support-75cm
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On Mon, 22 Apr 2013 09:28:08 -0700 (PDT), harry

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And a 2" steel post needs a cement footer, compared to a 4" wood post.
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(MICHELLE H.) wrote:

# This is the best way to install fence posts, with a metal spike driven # into the ground. Prevents rot for much longer than concrete and can # be taken out (but not that easily). # Also shorter posts can be used and quicker to install. # # <http://www.buyfencingdirect.co.uk/fencing-accessories/post-spikes-and-post-bases/110mm-post-support-75cm I used a couple of those to build a handrail next to concrete steps 10 years later, the handrail is still solid.
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-1
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On Mon, 22 Apr 2013 12:19:00 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (MICHELLE H.) wrote:

What type of soil do you have where the fence will go? The chain link fence poles can be hammered in with a fence pole hammer (exercise) if soft soil.
<
http://i01.i.aliimg.com/img/pb/062/581/311/311581062_424.jpg
That would be the cheap way. Careful to keep the pipe plumb, fence line straight. May be able to rent one.
Gravel is used for drainage as water will seep further in the ground. Cement is used for a more stable construction (prisons). Mounded above the soil and water drains away from the pipe.
...or put a fence around the garden
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Yeah, my neighbor has a garden, and he has a 6 foot high wooden stockade fence on his back property line. Last year he saw 4 deer sticking their necks OVER his 6 foot high fence, because they were eating all his Green Beans from his bean stalks!!!! They can stretch their necks out very far as well!!! And, yes I know they can jump over fences at least 8 feet high!!! I had some really nice tomato plants, lettuce, and pumpkins growing last year. In 1 night the damn deer ater it all and killed the plants!!!!!!
Anyway, the soil is somewhat of a sandy/loam mix. Some nice loam on the top as topsoil, probably a few inches, with sandy soil underneath. My neighbor told me to just put up one of those cheap 4 foot high Green plastic fences, or some chicken wire fencing, but I was thinking that chainlink would be a little more sturdy!?
Only want it temporary, as I will most likely get a 6 foot high wooden or PVC fence later on when I get the extra money. Yes, I heard that you can pound the posts in, but you have to be careful not to ruin the top, or you won't be able to get the "post caps" on!?
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Use a "sacrifice" post cap for the pounding process.
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On Mon, 22 Apr 2013 13:41:13 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (MICHELLE H.) wrote:

You can buy T-posts from a farm supply. They pound in and will work for plastic fencing. If you want chain link, that is not what I'd consider a temporary fence, and they are usually cememted in. If you want temporary, buy T-posts, pound them in with a driver made for that use, or a sledge hammer. Wire or use xip straps to attach the plastic fence to the posts.
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On Mon, 22 Apr 2013 12:19:00 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (MICHELLE H.) wrote:

It depends on the soil and the type of fence post. If you have sandy soil, you'll probably need concrete around any fence post. In *any* soil, you're going to need it around chain link posts. They're too thin to hold without a slug of concrete. 4x4s in clay soil are perfectly fine.

Not IMO.

A temporary chain link fence makes for some pretty expensive veggies.

I certainly wouldn't.
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On 4/22/2013 12:19 PM, MICHELLE H. wrote:

You'll be wasting your money if your intent is to keep out veggie chomping critters. Our area is infested with deer, racoons, rabbits, etc. Our 6' chain link fence keeps out none of the above. The small animals burrow under the fence and the deer jump it as if it were not there. Our neighbors have been successful by surrounding the perimeter of their veggie plot with vertical metal strips that are sunk down about 12" and protrude above ground level about 8". Inside the plot they've put up some tent poles and attached strong, nylon netting and fastened the margins of the netting securely to the metal strips. The holes in the netting are large enough to allow bees in to pollinate the veggie flowers but are small enough to keep out birds and 4 legged critters. They built the tent with a flap that ties securely with nylon twine. Seems to do the job.
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minimum of 8 inches stops MOST diggers - and nothing stops the "tree rats" - short of a well aimed .22
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R> MICHELLE H. wrote:

I believe deer can go even higher. But my experience says they won't.
http://mysite.verizon.net/despen/fence/
I've had that 6 foot fence up since 2009 and so far, not one deer has come in the yard.
However, deer can see right through chain link. I think it's important for the view to be blocked. Deer aren't likely to jump something when they can't see where they are going to land.
I don't think 5 feet of chain link will work and I don't think you'd be able to stretch the link onto the fence if you don't use cement. You could try cementing only the end posts but if I was doing chain link, I'd use cement on all the posts.
This last year, about 7 sections of my fence were destroyed by Sandy. After the trees were removed, we had deer tracks in the yard the next day. I just finished repairs so the deer will have to eat somewhere else.
Oh, yeah, raccoons. Nothing short of land mines or electricity will keep them out. I don't grow vegetables.
--
Dan Espen

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have a complete fence and get a dog, it will police the area and discourage visitors.....
only the corner post of my 6 foot chain link fence were concreted in over 15 years ago, no problems.
although the gate posts were also concreted in
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On 4/22/2013 1:52 PM, Dan Espen wrote:

I think an 8 ft fence will keep out any deer but smaller fences will deter them too. Deer are browsers and will walk along, bump into a fence and go other wheres. Netting will deter them and cheapest thing would be wooden posts with netting. It is not necessary to block their view. The whole garden should be enclosed or deer could just walk around fenced sections.
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Per Frank:

Has anybody tried an electric fence? Seems like the cheapest.
--
Pete Cresswell

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wrote:

found them in daylight. They were effective if they found them at night. Might work if you kept them turned off during daylight hours to maximize the chance of them finding them live by feel. They usually don't try the second time if they are anything like horses.
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On Mon, 22 Apr 2013 15:20:03 -0400, Frank

invitation. An 8 foot fence a challenge. An 8 foot board fence they cannot see through is quite effective, but not foolprof. Every year you get a couple jumping blind into swimming pools.
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Not surprised, but I thought Hosta were number one on their menu. Yeah I suppose veggies might be even more attractive.
--
Dan Espen

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