Faucet problems

I have a roughly 5 year old Delta faucet with one handle more or less like this one. http://www.deltafaucet.com/kitchen/details/4353t-dst.html The handle on the top that moves back forth for hot or cold is frozen and the ability to move the faucet back and forth from one side of the sink of the other is also beginning to freeze. Any suggestions for troubleshooting this?
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Kust,
Sounds like mineral build up. I'd recommend disassembly and cleaning. Do you have hard water? It may be time to replacee all of the rubber parts, too. Bet disassembly will be a pain.
Dave M.
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I was afraid that was going to be the suggestion (g). WHen I tear it apart so I use Lime Away, CLR, or just wipe it down.
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Lime away. But if you could afford a faucet that $$$, just buy a new one.
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I also think the problem is likely to be mineral buildup inside the faucet due to your having hard water.
I expect that CLR and Limeaway should be fine, but you might want to buy a bottle of gelled phosphoric acid based toilet bowl cleaner for this project at any place listed under "Janitorial Equipment & Supplies" in your yellow pages phone book. You might also be able to buy the same in the cleaning aisle of many home centers and hardware stores.
Phosphoric acid is the most commonly used active ingredient in bathroom cleaners because it cuts through soap scum like a hot knife through butter, but won't attack chrome plating; even at strong concentrations. Being gelled, it will stick to the surface of the parts you're wanting to clean without draining off, and that'll make the job easier because you won't have to be continually appling more acid as it drains away. And, like any acid, phosphoric acid will react aggressively with the mineral deposits left by your hard water.
I'm sure CLR or Limeaway would still work, it's just that a gelled acid meant for cleaning toilets will be thicker and would make the job easier by not draining off the deposits you're wanting it to dissolve.
DO NOT use a gelled HYDROCHLORIC acid based toilet bowl cleaner on anything that's chrome plated. Hydrochloric acid will attack the chrome of chrome plated parts. Hydrochloric acid works well to remove marks left by metal (especially aluminum) on glazed ceramic tiles or the porcelain of toilet bowls. It's a good idea to have both kinds of acids on hand for cleaning projects around your home. Be careful using hydrochloric acid based toilet bowl cleaner. If you get it on your skin it will start to irritate your skin after a few minutes. Keep a spray bottle full of water handy to wash it out if you get it in your eyes.
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Kurt Ullman wrote:

There is a thing called Silicon Grease, and it should be available at Lowes or Home Depot. That should make the parts move properly once disassembled.
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Ken,
Since this is drinking water, the OP should be sure that any lubricants that he uses are "food grade".
Dave M.
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wrote:

Email a picture of the faucet to Delta, they will send you a new one. They have a lifetime guarantee.
I have 2 in my bathroom that have each been replaced twice.
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wrote:

Buy the rebuild kit and clean it up. Should be a 15 minute job. There is not much to the mechanics of them, a couple of rubber cups and springs and an O ring or two.
If you find crud in there, consider a sediment filter in the line.
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