fan light bulbs hard to remove

I have a ceiling fan with a light kit (Casablanca) and the light bulbs are very hard to remove. Standard base, small globe bulb. I've been using GE brand bulbs. The last time it was so hard to unscrew that I actually twisted the bulb socket right out, and they are about impossible to reassemble due to the location of the locknut. Since the wiring at the bulb sockets was hard as a rock, I replaced the light kit with a Hunter that was identical. Since the bulbs were still very difficult to remove, I looked at the bulbs themselves, and they appear to have a rough surface on the threads, I suppose to keep them from vibrating out by themselves. My wife doesn't dare change a bulb for fear it will break in her hand before coming out. I've tried installing them loosely, but don't want to cause an arc situation, either.
So I'm looking for any suggestions on how other people have dealt with this.
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There was a huge thread a few weeks back about screwing lightbulbs. I believe you need a special torque wrench.
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wrote:

I'm having a similar problem with a hanging kitchen table fixture. Ceramic tubular decorations with the sockets deep inside... turn the bulb, the socket turns... holding the nut on the outside doesn't stop the rotation. Can't get two hands up inside to hold socket and bulb simultaneously :-(
...Jim Thompson
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Have read Vasaline and an electonic lube. Common suggestion is don't tighten when installing, merely enough contact for illumination.
On Sun, 16 Nov 2003 09:27:30 -0700, Jim Thompson

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There is a product used to lube the bulb/socket threads. I got it a Menards. It's basically a silicon-base grease ... Seems to works, however, I don't have too much experience with it. I have also used the stuff in theatre lighting units where the heat is very high 500 - 1000 watts ... not on the electrical contacts, but on the adjustment screws which move the bulb carrage closer to and further from the reflector. It does seem to work pretty good for this application even though it was not meant for it.
John wrote:

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I was visiting a friend who was fighting with a bulb in one of those fixtures. I thought he was joking until I gave it a try. I suggested spraying some silicone lube in there. He did and the bulb came right out again. Of course that was 2 minutes later. I'd think the silicone grease would last longer. They sell some silicone grease at Radio Shack for heat conductivity between a power transistor and heatsink. I'd think that would work if you cant find the others.
This must be what they call PROGRESS (making life easier for mankind). It used to be simple to change a lightbulb....... not no more!!!
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I've heard of using some paraffin to lube the threads. There's got to be a good answer.
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Try soap on the threads
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soap contains water, leading to rust.
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John wrote:

If you are using bulbs with aluminum threaded bases, try finding ones with brass bases. Those aluminum bases gall like crazy.
Jeff
-- Jeff Wisnia (W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
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The proper lube to use would be "dielectric grease" which will add the needed lubricant to ease a bulb out after it's blown out, improve connectivity, and aid in resisting corrosion.
Hope this helps, Steve
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