Fahrenheit vs. Celsius

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Dick Adams wrote:

Of course you must admit that 100 for boiling and 0 for freezing makes more sense.
BTW did you know that 98.6 is really 37
--
Joseph Meehan

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"Joseph Meehan"

Actually, zero for absolute zero makes more sense. Then we end up with something silly like 273.15 for the freezing point of water.
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As a practical matter, it makes absolutely no sense at all -- how would you calibrate such a thermometer? A scale based on the freezing and boiling points of water -- which is easily reproducible almost anywhere -- is eminently practical.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

The problem is correcting for atmospheric pressure. Not a big problem, but some would overlook it.
--
"A man\'s country is not a certain area of land, of mountains, rivers, and
woods, but it is a principle; and patriotism is loyalty to that principle."
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on the boiling point can easily be determined from reference books.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Silly, you just stand there and watch for it to boil.
The only times I care about temperature above 100F are when I am setting my water heater or pastuering honey

Sounds like a costume party to me. But this time let's do it to the duplicitious French and we dump their damn perfume into the harbor. :)
Dick
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wrote:

What temperature it boils at depends on the atmospheric pressure. Weather doesn't really make very much difference (about 1 degree Fahrenheit per inch of mercury barometric pressure, IIRC), but altitude sure does. The boiling point of water in, say, Quito, Ecuador is a *lot* lower than it is in New York.
--
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Ah, unit conversions.
As in the old saying, "You give some people 2.54 centimeters they will take 1.609 Kilometers every time!"
Really, why aren't automobile speedometers in standard units like furlongs/fortnight?
Remember the millihelen? That's the amount of feminine pulchritude (beauty) that is necessary to launch one ship. (reference is Helen of Troy, whose beauty launched a 1000 ships).
Christopher Columbus got 3000 miles/galleon in 1492! Started with 3 galleons, returned with one ===used 2 galleons traveled across the Atlantic and back to Europe ==`00 miles traveled
6000 miles/2 galleons = 3000 miles/galleon
of course a Spanish galleon was pretty expensive in those days!
Sorry, I could not resist
Morenuf
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On Sat, 11 Nov 2006 21:20:22 GMT, morenuf

A centipede is 1/100 of a pede (a unit of impedance, obviously). A millipede is 1/1000 of a pede.
OT: In 15th century France, it was "normal" for rich people to suspect the local water supply, and they had the weird idea that water would be purified after passing through a person's body. Because of this, many poor people would earn money by providing used water to the rich. These people were called peeers. Because or the awkwardness of the word, one of the 'e's was removed. These people liked to meet to discuss the business. This is the origin of "peer to peer networking".
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morenuf wrote:

Doesn't translate too well; my yard is 100 feet wide.

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Doug Miller wrote:

Um, altitude has a big effect on barometric pressure. The altimeters in aircraft depend on that.
--
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woods, but it is a principle; and patriotism is loyalty to that principle."
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Which means either Fahrenheit or Celsius! So much for the Kelvin Kline thermometer.

Now we're talkin. A barometric thermometer for the home. :)
Dick
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Joseph Meehan wrote:

Which is why I prefer to use the C scale. On a hot day, I am a lot cooler :)
Harry K
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Maybe to you, but not to me. I really don't care which scale you use and you shouldn't care which scale I use. But when in Rome, do as the Romans.

It really doesn't matter! But I will put that in my treasure trove of trivial knowledge.
Dick
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Dick Adams wrote:

The interesting point is that while the medical community in the US has set 98.6 as the normal body temperature, they only chose that because of the metric equivalent. This of course makes it easier to say someone is X amount above or below "normal" but it is less accurate as the actual normal is closer to a couple of tenths above or below (I forget which). So because they stuck with the converted value rather than the actual they are really a little off.
--
Joseph Meehan

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Joseph Meehan wrote:

Errm...I believe that the F scale was around long before the C. Could be wrong though.
Harry K
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wrote:

I think so. There was an R scale in there somewhere too.

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snipped-for-privacy@xmail.com0.invalid says...

R/F ~ K/C
-- Keith
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Joseph Meehan wrote:

Errm...I believe that the F scale was around long before the C. Could be wrong though.
Harry K
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Ok, everybody has had their fun with this topic--lets try something practical, like a fast "in your head" conversion from Deg C to Deg F.
In your head--double C, then subtract 10% and add 32 to that number to get F For example--100C Double it--200 Subtract 10% or 20 to get 180 Add 32 to get (180+32) or 212F
another example-10C double it less 10% or 20-2 add 32 or 18+32PF If you practice it a while you can do this conversion within a few seconds. Like this one: Thought process---10C ,that's 20 less 2 or 18 +32P MLD
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