Extension cord for gas stove.

Hello!
First off, before everyone kneejerks a response, let me point out again that this is a gas stove ;)
Ok, so we have a brand new Maytag gas stove sitting in the kitchen. Hooked up to gas just fine, but the nearest electrical outlet is about 8" too short. This is a 110 line for running the timers and igniters.
The Borg installer said that an extension cord is a really really bad idea. Now, I fiddle with low-volt DC circuits a lot, so my guess is that as long as
1) the extension cord's wire gauge meets or exceeds the actual cord attached to the stove 2) it is a 3-prong grounded cord 3) it doesn't exceed more than 6 feet in length 4) the connection between the stove's plug and the extension cord's socket is sufficiently high up off the ground to avoid fluid spills.
I should be ok anyways, right? I can't think of anything different between AC and DC that would matter in this context, but feel free to enlighten me, please.
Side question: I have many more questions. Would it be preferrable to the denizens of this newsgroup for me to post them in one topic, or in seperate topics? Just trying to fit in and not ruffle any feathers, thanks.
TIA
-phaeton
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There may be code-compliance issues. Anyhow, having a connection to an extension-cord behind an appliance can allow bad things to happen; for instance, as a result of any activity that might cause plug to partially retract.
Don't get hung up on "low-voltage" here, either. Most electrocutions occur with 110 v ac.
To me, it's a no-brainer: either install a new outlet within reach, or replace cord with one that will reach, and allow sufficient slack for normal service activities.
J
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In my case, 9V or 18V is mostly what I mess with, and that's what I considered "low voltage". I am aware of the dangers of 110 v ac, and in fact it makes me a little nervous. Maybe that's bad.

That's the ultimate solution, sure. I've never done it before and it's probably not something I should do w/o experienced help or guidance. I'm sure it's possible to do this w/o tearing the wall all to shit but I've seen a lot of examples where exactly that is what happened.

I was wondering about that. I haven't measured the length of the cord on the stove itself, but I've seen appliance cords for various things at Home Depot. $5 says that if i have to open the back of the stove the warranty will go bye bye.
Thanks for the reply..
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Look at "wiremold" for surface-mount outlet & wireway, for one. No need to open the wall.
Big boxes carry all sorts of replacement appliance cords. Cheaper way to go than the above, of course. Almost certainly, you get one a couple feet longer than you have, open a small cover at the rear, unscrew cable connections, then assembly is reverse of disassembly. At worst, you deal with wire nuts, which would only be a problem if your new cable had much larger conductors than the old.
I'm assuming you know how to properly connect something like a low-power cord- good mechanical connection (screws, solder, or taped wire-nuts), insulated, strain-relieved. Look for stuff like tattle-tale tape that'd show a cover had been removed. Do the job properly and fuhgeddaboudit, or ask a Borg person to show you on a floor-model what's involved. (Or make the change.)
This is really no biggie.
Other questions, you really should group by topic. And prepare, soon, to contribute with responses. :')
J
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Yes, and I was assuming it'd be just a small cover and 3 screws or nuts. Thenagain, sometimes you never know.

Of course, but not until i know what i'm talking about ;)
Thanks again. I think the new cord is the route i'll take here.
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I guess you can technically say any extension cord as a bad idea. What would I do? I'd use a very short heavy duty cord. Another option is to replace the existing wire right from the stove. What may be simple also, depending on the location and what you have to take apart for access.
The most a gas stove is going to draw is a few amps for an ignitor and a 40 watt bulb in the oven.

You may get better responses if you group them by topic. If a subject is of no interest to me, or a subject I have no knowledge of (and don't care about) I'll just skip the posting. I may happen to have the best answer for question #3 that I did not see though, in a large group. Overall, this is a pretty good group of people with a lot of knowledge.
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I see ;-). Most of my questions have little to do with each other, so they'd all be separate. I'll try to space them out (chronologically) so that I don't dogpile the newsgroup.

Absolutely. I dig around the Google archives a lot, and the S/N ratio and level of helpful responses is amazing. I've posted a number of questions already and gotten a lot of friendly help thus far, and haven't been flamed yet. You've set me straight a couple of times too, Edwin.
I'm pretty DIY with a lot of stuff- automobiles, electronics, music, computers, etc. For some reason, "home repair" is just not something that clicks with me the same way that "being mechanically inclined" does, even though you'd think it should. Now, suddenly I'm a home owner. Lots of minor stuff I'm ok with, but for all intents and purposes, I'm a total n00b at this. I just bought my first hammer last weekend at age 31. It's embarassing- I probably feel the same way that illiterate adults feel when learning to read for the first time.
On the other hand, I don't want to pay someone to do something if I could do it myself.
Ok... thanks for the tips so far, I'm going to stop gushing now ;-)
(sorry).
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... : I guess you can technically say any extension cord as a bad idea. What : would I do? I'd use a very short heavy duty cord. Another option is to : replace the existing wire right from the stove. What may be simple also, : depending on the location and what you have to take apart for access. ===> Agreed. For 8 inches short, there's no good reason to be spending a lot of money. A Heavy duty extension cord, such as are sold for air conditioners, should make a great solution. I don't think they're available any shorter than 3 feet, but that should allow for the cord to be routed reasonably, too. the "problem" is that codes usually don't allow for an extension cord to be used as a "permanent" wiring. So, technically, a longer cord is required. Or move the outlet. BUT ... I have had reason to have full house inspections done in the last couple of years and the a/c cord for the stove was NEVER a concern in any way. They both looked at it, one touched it gently, and they both moved on. So, there's "shoulda" and reality. Reality is, it's as protected behind the stove as is the stove cord, and no more likely to be damaged. : : The most a gas stove is going to draw is a few amps for an ignitor and a 40 : watt bulb in the oven. : : : : : > : > Side question: I have many more questions. Would it be preferrable to : > the denizens of this newsgroup for me to post them in one topic, or in : > seperate topics? Just trying to fit in and not ruffle any feathers, : > thanks. ===> Yes, they should be grouped by topics at least. I'ts best to keep each one in its own thread.
HTH,
Pop
: : You may get better responses if you group them by topic. If a subject is of : no interest to me, or a subject I have no knowledge of (and don't care : about) I'll just skip the posting. I may happen to have the best answer for : question #3 that I did not see though, in a large group. Overall, this is a : pretty good group of people with a lot of knowledge. : :
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For 8" short, you ought to be able to just buy a longer power cord for the appliance, shouldn't you?
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wrote:

I have a 1 foot heavy duty extension cord. Got it at a yard sale. I don't know how thick the wire itself is, because I've never looked inside. But the rubber cord is thick.
I'm sure the guy made it from a cord with a plug, and a separate one-outlet end, good quality.
This one is perfectly clean, but I think he was getting old, or had moved.

Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let me know if you have posted also.
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wrote:

The BORG sells the hell out of extension cords. Does the guy in the electrical aisle say they are death traps when you buy them?
I agree this is not the optimal solution but a short heavy duty extension cord is not going to be the most dangerous thing you do in the kitchen.
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replying to gfretwell, Birdie wrote: So I should be ok with a heavy duty short extension cord,to plug my gas stove in
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phaeton wrote:

...
...
I would go for a new, longer cord on the stove. Get one from a real electrical supply. You can unplug the one you have, remove it from the stove and bring it in. Tell them you need one at least a foot longer. It should be a very simple safe cheap job.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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replying to Joseph Meehan, Birdie wrote: I think I should go this route ,
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replying to phaeton, Tony944 wrote: Length of the cord is not much relevant as long is secure, however does you stove have any receptacles on it for additional accessories’ that could make difference in power require or needed.
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On Sunday, June 5, 2016 at 2:44:05 PM UTC-4, Tony944 wrote:

ou

could make

Let's hope phaeton didn't wait 10 years for that answer!
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On Sun, 5 Jun 2016 15:55:50 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Anyone who posts through homeownershub deserves to wait 10 years.
--
Web based forums are like subscribing to 10 different newspapers
and having to visit 10 different news stands to pickup each one.
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