Expired Grass Seed Any Good?

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The other day when I was at my local hardware store, they were already starting to put out the grass seed, fertilizer, garden hoses, flower and vegetable seeds, and other spring items. So anyway, when glancing through the aisle, I happened to see a couple of bags of grass seed with the stores RED ( discount item ) price ticket on it. The regular price tickets are White, and the discount tickets are Red.
I was shocked at the price of $5 dollars, because this grass seed was selling at their store last year for like $16.99 for a 3 pound bag. I asked the guy working there if $5 dollars was the correct price, and he said it was, because they were discontinuing that brand, and were only going to sell "Scotts" seed and fertilizer from now on.
Anyway, the grass seed is called "GreenView Fairway Formula Grass Seed", and the bag states that "it's been used on golf courses for over 50 years".
They only had 3 bags left, and they were all 3 pound bags. Each bag was a DIFFERENT blend as well. The had 1 bag of "Kentucky Bluegrass", 1 bag of "Sunny Blend", and 1 bag of "Fall Seed Mixture".
Now here is the interesting part, when I looked on the back of the bag, to see if there was any kind of expiration date, there was one on the back label of all 3 bags:
The "Kentucky Bluegrass" said "sell by March 2010".
The "Fall Seed Mixture" said "sell by January 2009".
And the "Sunny Blend" said "sell by December 2009".
So does grass seed really go bad after its expiration date? Besides the "Kentucky Bluegrass", which expires MArch 2010, would it be a waste of money buying the other 2?
Like I said, this grass seed was selling at the store for something like $16.99 last year, and now its only $5 bucks, because they are only going to carry "Scotts" seed and fertilizer now.
Also, does anyone know anything about this brand, "GreenView Fairway Formula", or has anyone tried it and used it before? If so, is it any good?
I have never tried the "GreenView" brand before, and always used either "Scotts" or "Pennington" grass seed and/or fertilizer.
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MICHELLE H. wrote: ...

... A) No, as long as it hasn't been wet or otherwise stored where it was actually damaged, at worst it'll have a _slightly_ low germination rate.
B) Depends on whether you have a suitable use for it and whether the blend/varieties are suitable for your climate/soil.
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MICHELLE H. wrote:

I'd buy it if it were here. Like was said, slightly lower germination rate.
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On Mar 1, 6:31�pm, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (MICHELLE H.) wrote:

It all depends on the storage, should be kept cool and DRY.. Smell it, it should smell like hay & not a foul smell. The main reason for "expiry dates" is so that stock gets used in rotation. Ie, you don't get one left at the back of the shelf for ten years.
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"MICHELLE H." wrote:

Keep it dry and cool and grass seed will keep for years. Most seeds (not just grass seed) lose a small percentage of germinating ability over time, but most all seeds stay viable longer than people realize.
Besides the

It will be a waste of money buying any of them if they're not the right grass mixtures or blends for your area. You have to decide based upon the conditions for the area you intend to seed. Pick a grass mixture or blend that will do well in that area. BTW, a blend is made up of two or more varieties of the same grass. Example: a Kentucky bluegrass blend consisting of, say Excalibur Kentucky bluegrass, Champagne Kentucky blue, and Bordeaux Kentucky blue. A mixture consists of two or more types of grasses. Example: a mixture of Excalibur Kentucky blue, Primo Perennial ryegrass, Alliant fescue. As a rule, mixtures are better for all-purpose lawns since the different grasses will allow for better turf establishment under varying conditions of soil, shade, care and wear.

Don't worry about the brand; it's meaningless. All that matters is the variety name of the grasses inside the bag. You see, neither Scotts nor GreenView nor any other company grow and harvest the seeds they sell. They all buy them from the companies that do produce them, and then package them under their own label. Reliant Kentucky bluegrass from Scotts is the same seed as Reliant Kentucky bluegrass sold by Schultz, or Sears, or anyone else. The only difference is the company name and the price.
General tips for buying grass seed: it's usually least expensive to get a quality grass seed, or blend, or mixture from a local farm & garden or landscape company that sells it by the pound. They select grasses that are known to perform well in your area, so it's less of a gamble picking varieties. Avoid grass mixtures containing _annual_ ryegrass - that is junk seed used as filler in cheap mixtures. Naturally, check the label to make sure the percentage of weed seed is as low as possible - but also check for a listing for crop seed. Crop seed are seeds from plants that are not normally grown for turfgrass but are commercially raised as crops. In other words, that's more undesirable seed since it won't make a good lawn, so you don't want much of that in the mixture, either.
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wrote:

A bit of annual ryegrass is not a bad option because it acts as a "nurse crop" for the slower growing and more delicate higher quality grasses.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

That's an old wive's tale that has been discredited by research. Annual rye, because it sprouts and grows faster than perennial grass varieties, successfully outcompetes the desirable grass plants for food, water, and sunlight. In other words, it holds back the development of the lawn. So avoid it for permanent plantings. It is good for providing quick and temporary cover - say, if you've an area you plan to landscape in the autumn, but don't want it bare or weedy all summer.
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Or for seeding those areas out by the road that the town plow tears up every winter. No way I'm using quality grass seed out there year after year after year.
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All good advice that I agree with. As you say, grass seed germination rates will drop slowly over the years, but this seed is basicly fresh and as good as anything else available as far as date goes, provided it's been stored in a reasonable environment. The more important question is if any of those are the right choices for the area based on sun/shade, location, does it have to blend in with existing grass, what your goal is, etc
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On Mar 1, 12:31pm, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (MICHELLE H.) wrote:

Its last years grass seed, every year germination rates go down, germination rates % can be found online. Its probably a good deal for seed, but is it a quality low weeded seed. Scotts has few weeds.
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Hi,
Thanks for the responses. Yeah there is probably nothing wrong with it, the hardware store probably just made some kind of "sweetheart deal" with a "Scotts" representative to only carry "Scotts" brand stuff, and so they have to discontinue and get rid of all the other brands. "Scotts" probably hooked them up to get the "Scotts" products at a good buying price, so that they can turn around and sell it for a great PROFIT price.
I have heard that "Scotts" is running scared, because they now have serious competition from the company called "Pennington" grass seed and fertilizer, which Home Depot and Lowes is now starting to carry more and more of.
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"MICHELLE H." wrote

They will be fine. Chances are they are the right types for your area as well or they wouldnt be selling them. I'd mix all 3 together then spread a little heavier than normal.
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On Mar 1, 1:31pm, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (MICHELLE H.) wrote:

I put out seed that were out of date by 4 years and I thought they came up pretty good.Think the brand was Dixie , Rebel, somethink like that.
Jimmie
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For that savings, I'd buy it and toss it in the yard and see what happens. I bet it grows.
Steve
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It's grow. I have planted grass seed that was 5 or 6 years old and it grew. You might get 2 to 5% less germination, but at around 70% off the original price. so what if a few seeds dont germinate. You can always test plant some seeds in a plastic cup, but by the time it grows, the store will lileky be sold out.
On Mon, 1 Mar 2010 13:31:51 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (MICHELLE H.) wrote:

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On Mon, 01 Mar 2010 18:20:11 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

Here's the issue with old seed. Let's say you got some old seed that tests 20% germination. You will need 5X the amount of new seed to get the proper coverage. That's fine, but every seed has a percentage of weed content which, unlike the grass seed, will stay closer to 100% germination (crab grass seed will keep well for 20 years or more).
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Phisherman wrote: ...

It would take being _VERY_ old indeed, to have a certified seed batch have only 20% germination rate....the OP is talking about last year. If it's down enough to be detectable I'd be surprised...
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Someone .......................... wrote
It will be a waste of money buying any of them if they're not the right grass mixtures or blends for your area. You have to decide based upon the conditions for the area you intend to seed. Pick a grass mixture or blend that will do well in that area. BTW, a blend is made up of two or more varieties of the same grass. Example: a Kentucky bluegrass blend consisting of, say Excalibur Kentucky bluegrass, Champagne Kentucky blue, and Bordeaux Kentucky blue.
Yes here, for example, it has been observed, that Kentucky Blue is not the best choice for our coolish climate. Also it is much more prone, it has been reported on various phone in garden radio shows, to cinch bug damage. Cinch bug itself was never native to this area but has somehow come to be recognized as a problem in recent years during a building boom!
And, it is suspected, developers, builders and residents using inappropriate seeds! Possibly bought at a big box store without any reference to its suitability! As always stick to plants/grass/trees more native or at least 'suitable' for ones area/climate. And just don't depend on a store clerk to say "Yes we sell lots of this to local residents", as a recommendation!
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Depends if the grass seed had proper storage.
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On Mon, 1 Mar 2010 13:31:51 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (MICHELLE H.) wrote:

...
Seed is sold for a specific year for germination. However, I have used grass seed that is 2-3 years old. Test for germination rate by placing 20 seeds between a moist paper towel covered with plastic and wait 7 days. If 80% sprout or better your old seed is still good.
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