Electrical Problem has me stumped .. .. ..

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The fixtures are only a few weeks old and were replaced hoping that what you suggested is/was the problem .. .. ..
Michelle P wrote:

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I don't think it's vibration related .. .. the posts are subjected only to wind load, which in this area is minimal. Some bulbs simply have burned out filaments, some have blackened areas inside the bulb, some have actually had broken glass, and one time the remaining piece was about filled with water. That's when I decided to change the fixtures, of course, to no avail.
Mark wrote:

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Just a couple of points. One forget the traffic signal lamps . I tried them ,nice brite light short life . Traffic signal lamps are designed to burn from a horizonal base, which bring me to my second point. Burning position. My post lights have the bases facing up and my carraige lights have the bases facing down . As strange as it sounds some lamps are designed to burn in only certain positions. Lamps that can burn in any position are called universal and have a "U" stamped on them . Lamps designed to burn in only certain positions are so marked ( usually marked on the package) .
It all has to do with the way the filament is supported and what the filament is made of.
Bill
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I've
sensor.
with
If I'm not mistaken, there are lamps available rated for 130 volts - would that help?
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Joseph Meehan has provided the complete answer. Now to put numbers to his answer. A 120 volt bulb will burn out in half the time when operated at 127 volts. IOW if the failure is due to voltage, you can only learn about this problem using a meter.
Blackening is what happens when the filament vaporizes. Once the bulb reaches its end of life, much of the filament has vaporized and deposited on the glass. Higher voltage (only 7 volts more) can cause a major increase in vaporization. Bulb burns out in half the time.
Vibration is problematic when the filament is hot. One need only jar a lamp post with enough force to cause a hot filament to break. Those are the factors - sharp vibration when illuminated and higher line voltage - that cause premature incandescant bulb failure. Is it voltage? You don't know until you have measured with a volt meter. Neutral wire problems are but one way that voltage can become excessive. A small voltage increase can massively reduce light bulb life expectancy. The relationship is exponental.
"<<< Bb >>>" wrote:

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<<<__ Bb __>>> wrote:
New sensor installed a few minutes ago .. .. .. I'll see if it does any good .. .. thanx for all the replies !! !! !!
I'll try replacing the sensor as this problem occurs on both lights (one sensor controls both)
thanx .. .. ..
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