electrical panel question

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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

so replace them as they go bad
plus arc fault breakers for

you can install GFCI without a service upgrade
plus the panel is mazed out.
unless expansion is warranted, being maxed out isn't a problem -- it just means you're using all the capacity you initially paid for
come

I seriously doubt the amount spent will be recovered in a sale
let alone

be specific -- what does an upgrade allow that you couldn't do separately?

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CJT wrote:

You know electric service is similiar to a appliance... What other appliances do you use forever? Its all well and good to save money but its smart money to invest in your home. upgrading does just that and trust me a 35 year old maxed out panel will be flagged by a home inspector as needing upgrading..
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wrote:

Still confused, it 'needs upgrading' why?
By code?
Your option?
later,
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tom the great, no doubt you drive a 40 year old car and never replace anything at your home or you wouldnt ask this........ you old 40 year old mower is still cutting grass fine?
theres a time for patch and make do, and if you pown a home upgrading should be a ongoing operation so your entire home doesnt need done at once
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wrote:

Of course there's a difference between actual upgrading, and replacing things for no reason.
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wrote:

Thanks for taking the time to reply.
I just don't see spending money to fix what isn't broke.
When I win the lottery, I guess I'll find new places to spend cold cash.
Thanks,
tom
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If you owned a home and looked as it as a investment besides being your residence you would understand.
if you do own a home do you ever fix it up beyond the minimum patch job?
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wrote:

Yes, but your premiss is wrong. When I do fix something, it usually means it is broken or needs fixing.
What is broken( or needs fixing) with his panel, requiring replacement/upgrading?
tom
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wrote:

It was pizzled?
:)
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The problem is the lights dim for a second when the AC and heat come on. My microwave takes so much power it also dims the lights when it is on. My current plan is to get a volt and amp meter and hook it to the mains supply and watch the values when the AC comes on. If the voltage drops then I am told that the problem is the transformer located 120 feet from my meter. The transformer is unable to supply sufficient voltage. If the volts and amps don't drop (or drop very little) then the problem is something else.
Thanks,
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Jason wrote:

You have the right plan there. Jason. But just be damn careful if you really intend to "hook" an ammeter to the mains supply.
If there's enough "slack" in the mains feed coming into the panel to get a "clamp on" ammeter around each wire, one at a time, you could do it. But if there isn't, I wouldn't recommend trying to mess with those input wires, you probably can't kill the power on them without having the electric company come and "pull" the meter for you.
Actually, measuring the current isn't really the issue, if the current peaked too high the main breaker would prolly pop. It's the voltage you should be monitoring when you kick the AC and heat on. And if the AC and heat use 240 volts then monitor the voltage across the two hot input lines.
The power company's transformer may be OK, but 120 feet is sort of on the long side for a residential feed, and if the original installers skimped a bit on the feeder size that may well be where your problem stems from.
HTH,
Jeff
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