Electrical - Is this legal to code?

Page 3 of 3  


Yes, that's the issue.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I had a home for sale the home inspector wrote up the sump pump was not GFCI protected, sump pump was in garage. So I added the GFCI, but the sale fell thru:(
the 2nd home buyers inspector wrote up that the sump pump should NOT be GFCI protected......
there was no way to win.......
selling that home was a nightmare.....
the 2 different inspectors reports had nearly nothing in common, and inspector 2 had the first inspectors report
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And apparently neither knew that the code requirements in virtually all cases are not retroactive. Meaning that whatever applied when the outlet for the sump pump was put in is all that needs to be met. With the view they had it's a wonder they didn't come up with a whole list of crap.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/6/2012 10:29 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

price down. In my business, I get this all the time, and I generally mention that not a stitch of the 1975 wiring in this house meets current code,so why just pick on the non ground fault protection for all the kitchen counter outlets, lets gut this puppy. Can't tell you how many letters I've written as well, refuting "home inspectors". But in the end, it usually comes down to it being a buyers market or sellers market.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 04 Aug 2012 01:43:05 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@thecave.com wrote:

safety reasons - so you can cut the power quickly in case of a malfunction/emergency. As I stated before, I would use a 240 volt disconnect at the door and tie the 2 cables together at both ends - sharing the neutral - and mark appropriately.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/7/2012 8:10 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Who said anything about "protected"?

As dpb said several days ago (and quoted above) the NEC wants the disconnect "at the nearest point where it enters the building rather than by the door."

Paralleling the neutrals is a code violation and not necessary.
borrowed from different post: > Use a fused or breaker type subpanel in the outbuilding
A breaker subpanel in the shed for 2-20A circuits? All that is required is a simple switch. As the OP said (quoted above) "it would be senseless to put another 20A breaker for each circuit in the shed."
But no problem. Holmes will fix the wiring you do when he discovers it.
--
bud--




Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 3 Aug 2012 07:06:25 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

I'd tie the 2 neutrals together and use a fused 2 pole (240 v) disconnect, grounded with the one existing bond wire - connected to a "tied" 240 volt breaker at the main panel - giving the capability of using as a 240 volt supply if required. Use a fused or breaker type subpanel in the outbuilding
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/4/2012 11:16 AM, HerHusband wrote:

He has 5 wires, total...one 12/2 w/G another 12/2 w/o
Rather than all that which isn't compliant either (not supposed to have multiple cables making up one circuit) he might as well just use the one 3-wire from a double-pole supply breaker and go to a box in the outbuilding and then from there the internal circuits. He can have both that way (assuming he uses an appropriate box, of course). He'll still be limited to the overall capacity of the 12 AWG wire but sounds like pretty small loads any way.
What he loses is that at the moment he does have two 20A circuits.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/4/2012 1:36 PM, dpb wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I missed that in the original post, but that would make the installation easier having a dedicated ground wire. Just cap off and ignore the extra white neutral wire (you would still have to do some testing with a meter to determine which wire you are using).

Agreed, but it's kind of too late to be completely code compliant at this point and still have two circuits. Electrically, the four wires in the two cables would be no different than running four individual wires in conduit. The rest is a typical subpanel installation.
I would make it all up as I described. If he ever digs up the line and installs conduit and the proper wires, it would be an easy conversion.

As RBM posted, that wouldn't provide two 120V circuits with neutrals and a ground. The method I posted does, and also leaves the option for a 240V circuit if you need that.

Yep, by not planning ahead, the original poster has seriously limited what he can do. Still, he's probably not going to have more than a light and an outlet or two in a shed.
I ran conduit to my shed, with 10 gauge wire to support a 30A subpanel. That's way more than I'm likely to need, but I can always pull that out and feed bigger wire if I need to.
Anthony Watson Mountain Software www.mountain-software.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.