Electrical-breakers in a subpanel

On an older house, the meterbox has the main breaker-60A, 240V. Upstairs at the subpanel are
15A 40A 240 V 20A
20A 20A 240V 15A 20A
The 40A 240 is for the kitchen stove I don't know what the 20A 240V is-there isn't anything in the unit that would need this. If there are electrical heaters, is it possible these are fed from one leg each? The heaters are 110. Any suggestions for what it could be? Two 20A circuits with one neutral?
How much more can the subpanel carry? can I add a 15A and a 20 A circuit for a garbage disposal and Dishwasher?
charles
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at the

I have not seen a 60 amp service in a long time.
Appendix D of the NEC has residential load calculation examples. Do a load calculation before you go to far. You might need a new service.
I am not aware of any on line resources for appendix D.
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SQLit wrote:

The 20A 2-pole breaker might be for the kitchen countertop, refrigerator, and dining room outlets.
Best regards, Bob
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Charles Bishop wrote:

Upstairs at the

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Around here it's rare to find electric heating in a house with a 60-A service. By the time electric heating became (misguidedly) common, 100-A or 150-A services were the norm.
Is that 20A dual-pole breaker connected to cable? If not, it may have never been used. Maybe it came with the panel or was installed needlessly.
Consider using it for the DW and disposal, assuming they're near each other. Run 12/3 from the panel to a box in the vicinity of the appliances then run 12/2 to each of them.
Make very sure that it actually feeds from different legs (ie, that it really is 240). But see if your jurisdiction requires gfci for new dishwasher or disposal hookups. Around here, I believe it does not.
Not that you asked, but while I was at it I'd also check that that 20A circuits are really wired with 12 gauge, and I'd see if new breakers, including gfci and afci, are available for the old panel. If not, you may find that you'll want to replace it sooner rather than later.
Chip C Toronto
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