Electrical box

Page 1 of 2  
Ok, so I'm probably making more of this than I need to ...
I am replacing outlets to match new paint in a room and did not notice that one electrical box still has the old screw in the bottom hole ... evidently it broke in the hole. There is nowhere to grip it on either side, not even with needlenose pliers. The plies basically slide off as soon as I go to turn it.
Can I take a tiny drill bit and drill it out or is there an easier way?
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Instead of a drill you're probably going to want to use an easy-out to attempt to back the screw out. You can also drill out the hole and replace the screw with a bigger one.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't see how he can use an easy out on a screw that small. It;s not a 1/4 bolt. If there is enough screw on the far side, willshak's suggestion of using the bent type of needle nose pliars sounds good. Also, if there is enough on the front side to try to get a grip on, I'd use something more like a small pair of lineman type pliers that have small teeth on them to try to get it, rather than needle nose which are smooth.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote the following:

No, the jaws are not smooth. They are grooved (teethed) for grip.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sep 17, 9:25 am, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

No, it's an 8-32 screw. There are extractors that will take them out. If he can get the screw to go either direction the screw can be removed. Or, as I said, he can drill it out and use a larger screw (eitehr tapping the hole or use a sheet metal screw.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
keith wrote:

notice
...
either
off
to
You have to drill a hole in the screw to fit the easy out into don't you know?
--
LSMFT

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
tom snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote the following:

I am assuming (perhaps wrongly) that this is a metal outlet box? You can buy a bent-nose pair of needle nose pliers (I have a pair). It will allow you to get a better grip on the screw. http://preview.tinyurl.com/28roka3 I would get a q-tip and spray the cotton end with some liquid wrench and dab both sides of the screw ( I wouldn't spray the liquid into the outlet box). The other solution would be to cut the box from the stud and then install a new existing wall box, the one with wings that grip the sheetrock.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
tom snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

You talking the cover plate mount hole or the grounding screw, just to be certain? If the latter, just drill a new hole and go on...
If the former 'tis a pita. If it took me more than 10 minutes fooling with it I'd probably just replace the box and go on.
--
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Is the bottom screw that holds the receptacle to to box. The issue with replacing the box is having to fix the drywall that I'd have to cut to get the box out ... trying to avoid going that route if at all possible.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
tom snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote the following:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qq4UkWsUWoo

--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
willshak wrote the following:

...and putting a new box in.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=reUPG0i4jOM&feature=related

--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
tom snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

It's faster to fix a little drywall the the grief is worth otherwise...
--
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dpb wrote:

Intended to add -- the way to fix it if it can be is to drill out the broken screw and re-tap the hole. Again, if that didn't succeed in about 10 minutes or less I'd be on to the next stage and be done in the time spent here so far...
--
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 17 Sep 2010 06:31:05 -0700 (PDT), "tom snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com"

If you have the bent nose pliers, try to run it "in" until it goes out the back side. There is more meat on the inside to grab. If you do bugger up the threads or drill it out so bad another screw won't bite you can get a "U" shaped speed nut that slips over the ear to create a new thread.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 17 Sep 2010 06:31:05 -0700 (PDT), "tom snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com"

It has probably been suggested already, but I didn't read the replies. You can try to grip the screw inside the box and twist it where the screw will run into the box and fall out.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I try to break the screw off flush and use a #6 Philips head self drilling screw to replace it
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

24 hours after you spray the thing with liquid wrench try a bit that is half the diameter of the screw. If you are living right the screw will pop out the back side with no damage to the threads.
Worst case you drill it out and use a larger screw.
--
Colbyt
Please come visit http://www.househomerepair.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 09/17/2010 06:39 PM, Colbyt wrote:

I've managed to pop several "new work" boxes out and replace with old work boxes with just a screwdriver, crowbar, and hammer. No damage to walls. Of course the walls in my house are plaster which is slightly more resilient than sheetrock. Still, it is an option.
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thank you Nate and everyone else. I've got a few things to try tomorrow.
One of bigger issues that I have with removing/replacing the box is that the box is apparently a ... for lack of a better term ... sidestrap box based on other reno we've done and what I've found elsewhere. So if you're looking forward at the box, the box resides on the left of a stud with the attachment wrapping and nailed to the front of the stud (older home, nothing in here is what one would expect). While the example video was informative, it's not an option to saw through some nails to get the box out.
However, I appreciate all replies and ideas, and will tackle this this weekend.
Thank you.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

No one mentioned another option........having found boxes where the wires are way too short..
install a new box nearby, run romex between boxes and use a blank cover on the abandoned box.....
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.