Electric Water Heater Maintenance

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My 40 gallon low boy electric water heater may need maintenance. When I hook the garden hose to it to wash the crud out, do I have to turn off the incoming water, or do I just let it rip for a few minutes? The last time I did it, I turned off the power and the water and let all of the tank water run out. It seems to me that having the incoming water would serve to wash the crud out instead of just letting it flow out.
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>My 40 gallon low boy electric water heater may need maintenance. When I hook the >garden hose to it to wash the crud out, do I have to turn off the incoming >water, or do I just let it rip for a few minutes? The last time I did it, I >turned off the power and the water and let all of the tank water run out. It >seems to me that having the incoming water would serve to wash the crud out >instead of just letting it flow out.
What you may wish to do if you are going to go to those lengths of cleaning out you water heater is: 1) Turn the electric off to the water heater and shut off the water supply to the tank. 2)Drain the tank and remove the POS plastic drain valve 3) Install a full port 3/4" (1/4 turn) ball valve. 4) Hook up the garden hose for flushing 5) Leave the water on to the water heater (this gives max press to remove the debris.) 6) Flush out any remaining debris. 7) Fill the tank back up, remove the drain hose, purge any air at the faucets and turn the electric back on.
In the future you should only have to drain anywhere from 1 to 5 gallons of water or until the water runs clear and or no visible debris remains. Bubba
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Bubba wrote:
> >> My 40 gallon low boy electric water heater may need maintenance. When I hook the >> garden hose to it to wash the crud out, do I have to turn off the incoming >> water, or do I just let it rip for a few minutes? The last time I did it, I >> turned off the power and the water and let all of the tank water run out. It >> seems to me that having the incoming water would serve to wash the crud out >> instead of just letting it flow out. > > What you may wish to do if you are going to go to those lengths of > cleaning out you water heater is: > 1) Turn the electric off to the water heater and shut off the water > supply to the tank. > 2)Drain the tank and remove the POS plastic drain valve > 3) Install a full port 3/4" (1/4 turn) ball valve. > 4) Hook up the garden hose for flushing > 5) Leave the water on to the water heater (this gives max press to > remove the debris.) > 6) Flush out any remaining debris. > 7) Fill the tank back up, remove the drain hose, purge any air at the > faucets and turn the electric back on. > > In the future you should only have to drain anywhere from 1 to 5 > gallons of water or until the water runs clear and or no visible > debris remains. > Bubba
Pardon me for being anal, but to be sure, in Step 5, don't you mean to turn the water back on since I turned it off in Step 1?
I did everything above (except replace the plastic drain valve, which I want to do). I opened two hot water faucets in the house to give the tank air to drain. After I closed the hot water faucets and then refilled the tank, I turn on the hot water faucets again to get rid of the air. The water that came out was nasty. If I fill the sink, it still has a yellow tint to it.
Now I'm wondering if I actually got the crap out of the tank. Does it sound like I need to go through the process again? When I first turned the drain valve on, the water coming out of it looked clean. In fact, the only nasty water I ever saw was coming out of the faucet.
Regarding replacing the plastic drain faucet, how do I do that? It's barely sticking out of the water heater. Should I be able to unscrew the whole assembly? When I go to Lowe's or Home Depot to get the 1/4 turn valve, what are the exact specifications? What size pipe, or however they're specified?
Thanks for your help!
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mcp6453 wrote: > Bubba wrote:
>> >>> My 40 gallon low boy electric water heater may need maintenance. When >>> I hook the garden hose to it to wash the crud out, do I have to turn >>> off the incoming water, or do I just let it rip for a few minutes? >>> The last time I did it, I turned off the power and the water and let >>> all of the tank water run out. It seems to me that having the >>> incoming water would serve to wash the crud out instead of just >>> letting it flow out. >> >> What you may wish to do if you are going to go to those lengths of >> cleaning out you water heater is: >> 1) Turn the electric off to the water heater and shut off the water >> supply to the tank. >> 2)Drain the tank and remove the POS plastic drain valve 3) Install a >> full port 3/4" (1/4 turn) ball valve. >> 4) Hook up the garden hose for flushing >> 5) Leave the water on to the water heater (this gives max press to >> remove the debris.) >> 6) Flush out any remaining debris. >> 7) Fill the tank back up, remove the drain hose, purge any air at the >> faucets and turn the electric back on. >> In the future you should only have to drain anywhere from 1 to 5 >> gallons of water or until the water runs clear and or no visible >> debris remains. >> Bubba > > Pardon me for being anal, but to be sure, in Step 5, don't you mean to > turn the water back on since I turned it off in Step 1? > > I did everything above (except replace the plastic drain valve, which I > want to do). I opened two hot water faucets in the house to give the > tank air to drain. After I closed the hot water faucets and then > refilled the tank, I turn on the hot water faucets again to get rid of > the air. The water that came out was nasty. If I fill the sink, it still > has a yellow tint to it. > > Now I'm wondering if I actually got the crap out of the tank. Does it > sound like I need to go through the process again? When I first turned > the drain valve on, the water coming out of it looked clean. In fact, > the only nasty water I ever saw was coming out of the faucet.
hmmm... might be rust? that's not good. If it doesn't go away I'd recommend draining it again and having a look at the anode. If it's completely gone, just get a new heater.
> > Regarding replacing the plastic drain faucet, how do I do that? It's > barely sticking out of the water heater. Should I be able to unscrew the > whole assembly?
yes.
> When I go to Lowe's or Home Depot to get the 1/4 turn > valve, what are the exact specifications? What size pipe, or however > they're specified?
3/4" pipe thread. You'll need a 3/4" dielectric nipple (should be right with the water heater stuff, that's what's used on the inlet/outlet pipes of a typical residential water heater,) a 3/4" pipe thread ball valve, and a 3/4" male pipe thread to garden hose thread adapter (typically found in the "loose brass fittings" area of the plumbing department.) Get a brass garden hose fitting cap as well, leave that on when you're not flushing. that way if you inadvertantly kick the valve you won't soak your shoes (or anything else within three feet of the water heater)
Since this is an electric water heater, you ought to be able to handle replacing it yourself, if required. I'd go ahead and put the brass drain valve on it as described above before you even fill it for the first time. Then flush it every year and check the anode every couple.
good luck
nate
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Nate Nagel wrote:
> hmmm... might be rust? that's not good. If it doesn't go away I'd > recommend draining it again and having a look at the anode. If it's > completely gone, just get a new heater.
It didn't look like rust, but I'll keep an eye on it. How do I check the anode?
> 3/4" pipe thread. You'll need a 3/4" dielectric nipple (should be right > with the water heater stuff, that's what's used on the inlet/outlet > pipes of a typical residential water heater,) a 3/4" pipe thread ball > valve, and a 3/4" male pipe thread to garden hose thread adapter > (typically found in the "loose brass fittings" area of the plumbing > department.) Get a brass garden hose fitting cap as well, leave that on > when you're not flushing. that way if you inadvertantly kick the valve > you won't soak your shoes (or anything else within three feet of the > water heater)
Thanks for your patience. This answer is excellent.
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>Nate Nagel wrote: > >> hmmm... might be rust? that's not good. If it doesn't go away I'd >> recommend draining it again and having a look at the anode. If it's >> completely gone, just get a new heater. > >It didn't look like rust, but I'll keep an eye on it. How do I check the >anode? > Its most likely just stuff you stirred up in the tank. Let it sit an hour or so and it will all settle to the bottom again.
The anode rode gets checked visually. Drain part or all of the water. Remove the relief valve if its in the side and look inside the tank. The rod looks like a smooth round 3/4" diameter rod new. It will probably look eaten away if its been in a few year. Unscrew it and install a new one if it is. Maybe $30 give or take a few. Bubba
>> 3/4" pipe thread. You'll need a 3/4" dielectric nipple (should be right >> with the water heater stuff, that's what's used on the inlet/outlet >> pipes of a typical residential water heater,) a 3/4" pipe thread ball >> valve, and a 3/4" male pipe thread to garden hose thread adapter >> (typically found in the "loose brass fittings" area of the plumbing >> department.) Get a brass garden hose fitting cap as well, leave that on >> when you're not flushing. that way if you inadvertantly kick the valve >> you won't soak your shoes (or anything else within three feet of the >> water heater) > >Thanks for your patience. This answer is excellent.
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Bubba wrote:
> >> Nate Nagel wrote: >> >>> hmmm... might be rust? that's not good. If it doesn't go away I'd >>> recommend draining it again and having a look at the anode. If it's >>> completely gone, just get a new heater. >> It didn't look like rust, but I'll keep an eye on it. How do I check the >> anode? >> > Its most likely just stuff you stirred up in the tank. Let it sit an > hour or so and it will all settle to the bottom again. > > The anode rode gets checked visually. Drain part or all of the water. > Remove the relief valve if its in the side and look inside the tank. > The rod looks like a smooth round 3/4" diameter rod new. It will > probably look eaten away if its been in a few year. Unscrew it and > install a new one if it is. Maybe $30 give or take a few.
The water heater is a State Industries P64020LS. The search function on their web site is broken, so I cannot find a manual for it. Based on what I just saw on the water heater, there is no way to replace a dip tube or an anode. There is about a foot clearance between the unit and the floor, since the water heater is in the crawl space. There are two plugs in the top, which are for blowing in the insulation. The only ports are the hot and cold water connections. Based on the reading I've done, the anode is a combo anode that is part of the hot water outlet assembly.
If the information I found is correct, the unit was installed in 2000. If that's true, it's probably time to start thinking about a new one, isn't it? The guy who installed it did so in a way that replacing it should not require a plumber. It's piped with copper. There are cutoff valves and unions (correct name) to make disconnecting the pipes easy.
This thread has been extremely helpful in learning more about water heaters. If I do get a new one (which I'm not going to do without a little more research into the true condition of this one), at least I will know to look for replaceable dip tubes and magnesium anodes. Right?
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On 2/14/2009 5:22 PM mcp6453 spake thus:

Make that "shutoff valves", not cutoff.
Are there flex connections between the plumbing and the heater? That's generally the easiest way to connect, and makes it even more "doesn't require a plumber to replace".
If not, you can easily add them yourself.
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mcp6453 wrote: > Bubba wrote:
>> >>> Nate Nagel wrote: >>> >>>> hmmm... might be rust? that's not good. If it doesn't go away I'd >>>> recommend draining it again and having a look at the anode. If it's >>>> completely gone, just get a new heater. >>> It didn't look like rust, but I'll keep an eye on it. How do I check >>> the anode? >>> >> Its most likely just stuff you stirred up in the tank. Let it sit an >> hour or so and it will all settle to the bottom again. >> >> The anode rode gets checked visually. Drain part or all of the water. >> Remove the relief valve if its in the side and look inside the tank. >> The rod looks like a smooth round 3/4" diameter rod new. It will >> probably look eaten away if its been in a few year. Unscrew it and >> install a new one if it is. Maybe $30 give or take a few. > > The water heater is a State Industries P64020LS. The search function on > their web site is broken, so I cannot find a manual for it. Based on > what I just saw on the water heater, there is no way to replace a dip > tube or an anode. There is about a foot clearance between the unit and > the floor, since the water heater is in the crawl space. There are two > plugs in the top, which are for blowing in the insulation. The only > ports are the hot and cold water connections. Based on the reading I've > done, the anode is a combo anode that is part of the hot water outlet > assembly. > > If the information I found is correct, the unit was installed in 2000. > If that's true, it's probably time to start thinking about a new one, > isn't it? The guy who installed it did so in a way that replacing it > should not require a plumber. It's piped with copper. There are cutoff > valves and unions (correct name) to make disconnecting the pipes easy. > > This thread has been extremely helpful in learning more about water > heaters. If I do get a new one (which I'm not going to do without a > little more research into the true condition of this one), at least I > will know to look for replaceable dip tubes and magnesium anodes. Right?
Since you'd have to disconnect the in and out to do the dip tube, then it shouldn't be a problem to tip it over enough to get the dip tube out. and the anode shouldn't be all that long either.
s
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te: > mcp6453 wrote: > > Bubba wrote:
> > >>> Nate Nagel wrote: > > >>>> hmmm... might be rust? �that's not good. �If it does n't go away I'd > >>>> recommend draining it again and having a look at the anode. If it's > >>>> completely gone, just get a new heater. > >>> It didn't look like rust, but I'll keep an eye on it. How do I check > >>> the anode? > > >> Its most likely just stuff you stirred up in the tank. Let it sit an > >> hour or so and it will all settle to the bottom again. > > >> The anode rode gets checked visually. Drain part or all of the water. > >> Remove the relief valve if its in the side and look inside the tank. > >> The rod looks like a smooth round 3/4" diameter rod new. It will > >> probably look eaten away if its been in a few year. Unscrew it and > >> install a new one if it is. Maybe $30 give or take a few. > > > The water heater is a State Industries P64020LS. The search function on > > their web site is broken, so I cannot find a manual for it. Based on > > what I just saw on the water heater, there is no way to replace a dip > > tube or an anode. There is about a foot clearance between the unit and > > the floor, since the water heater is in the crawl space. There are two > > plugs in the top, which are for blowing in the insulation. The only > > ports are the hot and cold water connections. Based on the reading I've > > done, the anode is a combo anode that is part of the hot water outlet > > assembly. > > > If the information I found is correct, the unit was installed in 2000. > > If that's true, it's probably time to start thinking about a new one, > > isn't it? The guy who installed it did so in a way that replacing it > > should not require a plumber. It's piped with copper. There are cutoff > > valves and unions (correct name) to make disconnecting the pipes easy. > > > This thread has been extremely helpful in learning more about water > > heaters. If I do get a new one (which I'm not going to do without a > > little more research into the true condition of this one), at least I > > will know to look for replaceable dip tubes and magnesium anodes. Right ? > > Since you'd have to disconnect the in and out to do the dip tube, then > it shouldn't be a problem to tip it over enough to get the dip tube out. > � and the anode shouldn't be all that long either. > > s- Hide quoted text - > > - Show quoted text -
Do be prepared to replace the tank if you mess with it!
Removing valves, drain valve will likewly break off, repolacing anodes and dip tubes, disturbingf the rust which may be plugging a leak.
Your far better off to leave it alone till it breaks/leaks and then install new tank which will have better insulation.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:
>> mcp6453 wrote: >>> Bubba wrote:
>>>>> Nate Nagel wrote: >>>>>> hmmm... might be rust? �that's not good. �If it doesn't go away I'd >>>>>> recommend draining it again and having a look at the anode. �If it's >>>>>> completely gone, just get a new heater. >>>>> It didn't look like rust, but I'll keep an eye on it. How do I check >>>>> the anode? >>>> Its most likely just stuff you stirred up in the tank. Let it sit an >>>> hour or so and it will all settle to the bottom again. >>>> The anode rode gets checked visually. Drain part or all of the water. >>>> Remove the relief valve if its in the side and look inside the tank. >>>> The rod looks like a smooth round 3/4" diameter rod new. It will >>>> probably look eaten away if its been in a few year. Unscrew it and >>>> install a new one if it is. Maybe $30 give or take a few. >>> The water heater is a State Industries P64020LS. The search function on >>> their web site is broken, so I cannot find a manual for it. Based on >>> what I just saw on the water heater, there is no way to replace a dip >>> tube or an anode. There is about a foot clearance between the unit and >>> the floor, since the water heater is in the crawl space. There are two >>> plugs in the top, which are for blowing in the insulation. The only >>> ports are the hot and cold water connections. Based on the reading I've >>> done, the anode is a combo anode that is part of the hot water outlet >>> assembly. >>> If the information I found is correct, the unit was installed in 2000. >>> If that's true, it's probably time to start thinking about a new one, >>> isn't it? The guy who installed it did so in a way that replacing it >>> should not require a plumber. It's piped with copper. There are cutoff >>> valves and unions (correct name) to make disconnecting the pipes easy. >>> This thread has been extremely helpful in learning more about water >>> heaters. If I do get a new one (which I'm not going to do without a >>> little more research into the true condition of this one), at least I >>> will know to look for replaceable dip tubes and magnesium anodes. Right? >> Since you'd have to disconnect the in and out to do the dip tube, then >> it shouldn't be a problem to tip it over enough to get the dip tube out. >> � and the anode shouldn't be all that long either. >> >> s- Hide quoted text - >> >> - Show quoted text - > > Do be prepared to replace the tank if you mess with it! > > Removing valves, drain valve will likewly break off, repolacing anodes > and dip tubes, disturbingf the rust which may be plugging a leak. > > Your far better off to leave it alone till it breaks/leaks and then > install new tank which will have better insulation. >
I agree in general, but in cases where there's financial considerations in play, one can occasionally get lucky. I've done everything mentioned in this thread save for the dip tube on an 18-year old gas water heater just because new ones are so ludicrously expensive (and being a new home moaner, a lot of disposable cash went away just to buy the place.) Took Excessive Force(tm) to undo all the threaded connections, but a little pipe dope on the threads was all that was required to put it back together. Now have clean hot water for my morning shower. Yay.
Since the OP is talking about an electric, yeah, I can see the case for replacement. Electrics at least around here are about half the price of gas and are a DIY job for an able handyman.
nate
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> snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:
> >> mcp6453 wrote: > >>> Bubba wrote:
e: > >>>>> Nate Nagel wrote: > >>>>>> hmmm... might be rust? that's not good. If it doesn't go away I'd > >>>>>> recommend draining it again and having a look at the anode. If it' s > >>>>>> completely gone, just get a new heater. > >>>>> It didn't look like rust, but I'll keep an eye on it. How do I chec k > >>>>> the anode? > >>>> Its most likely just stuff you stirred up in the tank. Let it sit an > >>>> hour or so and it will all settle to the bottom again. > >>>> The anode rode gets checked visually. Drain part or all of the water . > >>>> Remove the relief valve if its in the side and look inside the tank. > >>>> The rod looks like a smooth round 3/4" diameter rod new. It will > >>>> probably look eaten away if its been in a few year. Unscrew it and > >>>> install a new one if it is. Maybe $30 give or take a few. > >>> The water heater is a State Industries P64020LS. The search function on > >>> their web site is broken, so I cannot find a manual for it. Based on > >>> what I just saw on the water heater, there is no way to replace a dip > >>> tube or an anode. There is about a foot clearance between the unit an d > >>> the floor, since the water heater is in the crawl space. There are tw o > >>> plugs in the top, which are for blowing in the insulation. The only > >>> ports are the hot and cold water connections. Based on the reading I' ve > >>> done, the anode is a combo anode that is part of the hot water outlet > >>> assembly. > >>> If the information I found is correct, the unit was installed in 2000 . > >>> If that's true, it's probably time to start thinking about a new one, > >>> isn't it? The guy who installed it did so in a way that replacing it > >>> should not require a plumber. It's piped with copper. There are cutof f > >>> valves and unions (correct name) to make disconnecting the pipes easy . > >>> This thread has been extremely helpful in learning more about water > >>> heaters. If I do get a new one (which I'm not going to do without a > >>> little more research into the true condition of this one), at least I > >>> will know to look for replaceable dip tubes and magnesium anodes. Rig ht? > >> Since you'd have to disconnect the in and out to do the dip tube, then > >> it shouldn't be a problem to tip it over enough to get the dip tube ou t. > >> and the anode shouldn't be all that long either. > > >> s- Hide quoted text - > > >> - Show quoted text - > > > Do be prepared to replace the tank if you mess with it! > > > Removing valves, drain valve will likewly break off, repolacing anodes > > and dip tubes, disturbingf the rust which may be plugging a leak. > > > Your far better off to leave it alone till it breaks/leaks and then > > install new tank which will have better insulation. > > I agree in general, but in cases where there's financial considerations > in play, one can occasionally get lucky. �I've done everything me ntioned > in this thread save for the dip tube on an 18-year old gas water heater > just because new ones are so ludicrously expensive (and being a new home > moaner, a lot of disposable cash went away just to buy the place.) Took > Excessive Force(tm) to undo all the threaded connections, but a little > pipe dope on the threads was all that was required to put it back > together. �Now have clean hot water for my morning shower. Yay. > > Since the OP is talking about an electric, yeah, I can see the case for > replacement. �Electrics at least around here are about half the p rice of > gas and are a DIY job for an able handyman. > > nate > > -- > replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.http://members.cox.net/njnagel- Hi de quoted text - > > - Show quoted text -
with a brand new 40 gallon 6 year warranty gas tank under 400 bucks wheres the savings?
by the time you buy all the supplies, perhaps some tools and mess with it spending a 100 bucks is easy:(
a leak may not occur immediately but disturbing things makes it more likely in the next 6 months.
a tank dumping rust means the glass lining has failed, the rust is likely clogging small leaks..........
disturb rust get leak soon:(
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:
>> snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:
>>>> mcp6453 wrote: >>>>> Bubba wrote:
>>>>>>> Nate Nagel wrote: >>>>>>>> hmmm... might be rust? that's not good. If it doesn't go away I'd >>>>>>>> recommend draining it again and having a look at the anode. If it's >>>>>>>> completely gone, just get a new heater. >>>>>>> It didn't look like rust, but I'll keep an eye on it. How do I check >>>>>>> the anode? >>>>>> Its most likely just stuff you stirred up in the tank. Let it sit an >>>>>> hour or so and it will all settle to the bottom again. >>>>>> The anode rode gets checked visually. Drain part or all of the water. >>>>>> Remove the relief valve if its in the side and look inside the tank. >>>>>> The rod looks like a smooth round 3/4" diameter rod new. It will >>>>>> probably look eaten away if its been in a few year. Unscrew it and >>>>>> install a new one if it is. Maybe $30 give or take a few. >>>>> The water heater is a State Industries P64020LS. The search function on >>>>> their web site is broken, so I cannot find a manual for it. Based on >>>>> what I just saw on the water heater, there is no way to replace a dip >>>>> tube or an anode. There is about a foot clearance between the unit and >>>>> the floor, since the water heater is in the crawl space. There are two >>>>> plugs in the top, which are for blowing in the insulation. The only >>>>> ports are the hot and cold water connections. Based on the reading I've >>>>> done, the anode is a combo anode that is part of the hot water outlet >>>>> assembly. >>>>> If the information I found is correct, the unit was installed in 2000. >>>>> If that's true, it's probably time to start thinking about a new one, >>>>> isn't it? The guy who installed it did so in a way that replacing it >>>>> should not require a plumber. It's piped with copper. There are cutoff >>>>> valves and unions (correct name) to make disconnecting the pipes easy. >>>>> This thread has been extremely helpful in learning more about water >>>>> heaters. If I do get a new one (which I'm not going to do without a >>>>> little more research into the true condition of this one), at least I >>>>> will know to look for replaceable dip tubes and magnesium anodes. Right? >>>> Since you'd have to disconnect the in and out to do the dip tube, then >>>> it shouldn't be a problem to tip it over enough to get the dip tube out. >>>> and the anode shouldn't be all that long either. >>>> s- Hide quoted text - >>>> - Show quoted text - >>> Do be prepared to replace the tank if you mess with it! >>> Removing valves, drain valve will likewly break off, repolacing anodes >>> and dip tubes, disturbingf the rust which may be plugging a leak. >>> Your far better off to leave it alone till it breaks/leaks and then >>> install new tank which will have better insulation. >> I agree in general, but in cases where there's financial considerations >> in play, one can occasionally get lucky. �I've done everything mentioned >> in this thread save for the dip tube on an 18-year old gas water heater >> just because new ones are so ludicrously expensive (and being a new home >> moaner, a lot of disposable cash went away just to buy the place.) �Took >> Excessive Force(tm) to undo all the threaded connections, but a little >> pipe dope on the threads was all that was required to put it back >> together. �Now have clean hot water for my morning shower. �Yay. >> >> Since the OP is talking about an electric, yeah, I can see the case for >> replacement. �Electrics at least around here are about half the price of >> gas and are a DIY job for an able handyman. >> >> nate >> >> -- >> replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.http://members.cox.net/njnagel- Hide quoted text - >> >> - Show quoted text - > > with a brand new 40 gallon 6 year warranty gas tank under 400 bucks > wheres the savings? > > by the time you buy all the supplies, perhaps some tools and mess > with it spending a 100 bucks is easy:(
Sure, except I'd rather spend $100 than $700 (which is the going price for a gas heater around here - I would need a "short" tank which seems to be even more expensive) plus installation.
> > a leak may not occur immediately but disturbing things makes it more > likely in the next 6 months. > > a tank dumping rust means the glass lining has failed, the rust is > likely clogging small leaks.......... > > disturb rust get leak soon:(
Again, "sometimes ya get lucky." I'm not saying that this can't happen, but if I can put off a $1K plus expense for a couple years for $100, I'll do it again.
nate
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> snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:
> >> snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:
: > >>>> mcp6453 wrote: > >>>>> Bubba wrote:
ote: > >>>>>>> Nate Nagel wrote: > >>>>>>>> hmmm... might be rust? that's not good. If it doesn't go away I' d > >>>>>>>> recommend draining it again and having a look at the anode. If i t's > >>>>>>>> completely gone, just get a new heater. > >>>>>>> It didn't look like rust, but I'll keep an eye on it. How do I ch eck > >>>>>>> the anode? > >>>>>> Its most likely just stuff you stirred up in the tank. Let it sit an > >>>>>> hour or so and it will all settle to the bottom again. > >>>>>> The anode rode gets checked visually. Drain part or all of the wat er. > >>>>>> Remove the relief valve if its in the side and look inside the tan k. > >>>>>> The rod looks like a smooth round 3/4" diameter rod new. It will > >>>>>> probably look eaten away if its been in a few year. Unscrew it and > >>>>>> install a new one if it is. Maybe $30 give or take a few. > >>>>> The water heater is a State Industries P64020LS. The search functio n on > >>>>> their web site is broken, so I cannot find a manual for it. Based o n > >>>>> what I just saw on the water heater, there is no way to replace a d ip > >>>>> tube or an anode. There is about a foot clearance between the unit and > >>>>> the floor, since the water heater is in the crawl space. There are two > >>>>> plugs in the top, which are for blowing in the insulation. The only > >>>>> ports are the hot and cold water connections. Based on the reading I've > >>>>> done, the anode is a combo anode that is part of the hot water outl et > >>>>> assembly. > >>>>> If the information I found is correct, the unit was installed in 20 00. > >>>>> If that's true, it's probably time to start thinking about a new on e, > >>>>> isn't it? The guy who installed it did so in a way that replacing i t > >>>>> should not require a plumber. It's piped with copper. There are cut off > >>>>> valves and unions (correct name) to make disconnecting the pipes ea sy. > >>>>> This thread has been extremely helpful in learning more about water > >>>>> heaters. If I do get a new one (which I'm not going to do without a > >>>>> little more research into the true condition of this one), at least I > >>>>> will know to look for replaceable dip tubes and magnesium anodes. R ight? > >>>> Since you'd have to disconnect the in and out to do the dip tube, th en > >>>> it shouldn't be a problem to tip it over enough to get the dip tube out. > >>>> and the anode shouldn't be all that long either. > >>>> s- Hide quoted text - > >>>> - Show quoted text - > >>> Do be prepared to replace the tank if you mess with it! > >>> Removing valves, drain valve will likewly break off, repolacing anode s > >>> and dip tubes, disturbingf the rust which may be plugging a leak. > >>> Your far better off to leave it alone till it breaks/leaks and then > >>> install new tank which will have better insulation. > >> I agree in general, but in cases where there's financial consideration s > >> in play, one can occasionally get lucky. I've done everything mentione d > >> in this thread save for the dip tube on an 18-year old gas water heate r > >> just because new ones are so ludicrously expensive (and being a new ho me > >> moaner, a lot of disposable cash went away just to buy the place.) Too k > >> Excessive Force(tm) to undo all the threaded connections, but a little > >> pipe dope on the threads was all that was required to put it back > >> together. Now have clean hot water for my morning shower. Yay. > > >> Since the OP is talking about an electric, yeah, I can see the case fo r > >> replacement. Electrics at least around here are about half the price o f > >> gas and are a DIY job for an able handyman. > > >> nate > > >> -- > >> replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.http://members.cox.net/njnagel- Hide quoted text - > > >> - Show quoted text - > > > with a brand new 40 gallon 6 year warranty gas tank under 400 bucks > > wheres the savings? > > > by the time you buy all the supplies, perhaps some tools �and m ess > > with it spending a 100 bucks is easy:( > > Sure, except I'd rather spend $100 than $700 (which is the going price > for a gas heater around here - I would need a "short" tank which seems > to be even more expensive) plus installation. > > > > > a leak may not occur immediately but disturbing things makes it more > > likely in the next 6 months. > > > a tank dumping rust means the glass lining has failed, the rust is > > likely clogging small leaks.......... > > > disturb rust get leak soon:( > > Again, "sometimes ya get lucky." �I'm not saying that this can't happen, > but if I can put off a $1K plus expense for a couple years for $100, > I'll do it again. > > nate > > -- > replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.http://members.cox.net/njnagel- Hi de quoted text - > > - Show quoted text -
if your skillful enough to replace anode, dip tube, and drain valve replacing the tank should be easy.
home depot sells 40 gallon short tans for $362 bucks
new tanks are much more energy efficent so you might not be saving as much as you think
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> > > > > > > snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:
> > >> snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:
te: > > >>>> mcp6453 wrote: > > >>>>> Bubba wrote:
wrote: > > >>>>>>> Nate Nagel wrote: > > >>>>>>>> hmmm... might be rust? that's not good. If it doesn't go away I'd > > >>>>>>>> recommend draining it again and having a look at the anode. If it's > > >>>>>>>> completely gone, just get a new heater. > > >>>>>>> It didn't look like rust, but I'll keep an eye on it. How do I check > > >>>>>>> the anode? > > >>>>>> Its most likely just stuff you stirred up in the tank. Let it si t an > > >>>>>> hour or so and it will all settle to the bottom again. > > >>>>>> The anode rode gets checked visually. Drain part or all of the w ater. > > >>>>>> Remove the relief valve if its in the side and look inside the t ank. > > >>>>>> The rod looks like a smooth round 3/4" diameter rod new. It will > > >>>>>> probably look eaten away if its been in a few year. Unscrew it a nd > > >>>>>> install a new one if it is. Maybe $30 give or take a few. > > >>>>> The water heater is a State Industries P64020LS. The search funct ion on > > >>>>> their web site is broken, so I cannot find a manual for it. Based on > > >>>>> what I just saw on the water heater, there is no way to replace a dip > > >>>>> tube or an anode. There is about a foot clearance between the uni t and > > >>>>> the floor, since the water heater is in the crawl space. There ar e two > > >>>>> plugs in the top, which are for blowing in the insulation. The on ly > > >>>>> ports are the hot and cold water connections. Based on the readin g I've > > >>>>> done, the anode is a combo anode that is part of the hot water ou tlet > > >>>>> assembly. > > >>>>> If the information I found is correct, the unit was installed in 2000. > > >>>>> If that's true, it's probably time to start thinking about a new one, > > >>>>> isn't it? The guy who installed it did so in a way that replacing it > > >>>>> should not require a plumber. It's piped with copper. There are c utoff > > >>>>> valves and unions (correct name) to make disconnecting the pipes easy. > > >>>>> This thread has been extremely helpful in learning more about wat er > > >>>>> heaters. If I do get a new one (which I'm not going to do without a > > >>>>> little more research into the true condition of this one), at lea st I > > >>>>> will know to look for replaceable dip tubes and magnesium anodes. Right? > > >>>> Since you'd have to disconnect the in and out to do the dip tube, then > > >>>> it shouldn't be a problem to tip it over enough to get the dip tub e out. > > >>>> and the anode shouldn't be all that long either. > > >>>> s- Hide quoted text - > > >>>> - Show quoted text - > > >>> Do be prepared to replace the tank if you mess with it! > > >>> Removing valves, drain valve will likewly break off, repolacing ano des > > >>> and dip tubes, disturbingf the rust which may be plugging a leak. > > >>> Your far better off to leave it alone till it breaks/leaks and then > > >>> install new tank which will have better insulation. > > >> I agree in general, but in cases where there's financial considerati ons > > >> in play, one can occasionally get lucky. I've done everything mentio ned > > >> in this thread save for the dip tube on an 18-year old gas water hea ter > > >> just because new ones are so ludicrously expensive (and being a new home > > >> moaner, a lot of disposable cash went away just to buy the place.) T ook > > >> Excessive Force(tm) to undo all the threaded connections, but a litt le > > >> pipe dope on the threads was all that was required to put it back > > >> together. Now have clean hot water for my morning shower. Yay. > > > >> Since the OP is talking about an electric, yeah, I can see the case for > > >> replacement. Electrics at least around here are about half the price of > > >> gas and are a DIY job for an able handyman. > > > >> nate > > > >> -- > > >> replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.http://members.cox.net/njnage l-Hidequoted text - > > > >> - Show quoted text - > > > > with a brand new 40 gallon 6 year warranty gas tank under 400 bucks > > > wheres the savings? > > > > by the time you buy all the supplies, perhaps some tools and mess > > > with it spending a 100 bucks is easy:( > > > Sure, except I'd rather spend $100 than $700 (which is the going price > > for a gas heater around here - I would need a "short" tank which seems > > to be even more expensive) plus installation. > > > > a leak may not occur immediately but disturbing things makes it more > > > likely in the next 6 months. > > > > a tank dumping rust means the glass lining has failed, the rust is > > > likely clogging small leaks.......... > > > > disturb rust get leak soon:( > > > Again, "sometimes ya get lucky." I'm not saying that this can't happen, > > but if I can put off a $1K plus expense for a couple years for $100, > > I'll do it again. > > > nate > > > -- > > replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.http://members.cox.net/njnagel-H ide quoted text - > > > - Show quoted text - > > if your skillful enough to replace anode, dip tube, and drain valve > replacing the tank should be easy. > > home depot sells 40 gallon short tans for $362 bucks > > new tanks are much more energy efficent so you might not be saving as > much as you think- Hide quoted text - > > - Show quoted text -
sorrty forgot link:(
http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId 051&langId=-1&catalogId053&productId0112664&categoryID=5 02972
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I think they mark 'em up around here (metro DC area;) I've looked out of curiosity and they are significantly more expensive than that unless prices have dropped recently. I am actually a few minutes away from running over there to pick up a replacement cord for my right angle drill, so I'll have a chance to check.
Plus I think I would have it professionally installed because I'd want the guy to replace all my gas valves in the area (furnace, dryer, and WH) at the same time because none of them will operate without channellocks. If I did it myself then I'd have to run the old one to the dump, too... not a royal PITA but more time and money.
I likely would shop for the highest efficiency and a non-combo style anode rather than price anyway...
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
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Nate Nagel wrote:

OK, so I looked at HD... the 6 year tank was actually $388ish, but they didn't have any. 9 year was $488. don't recall what the 12 year was but it was more expensive yet, obviously... I think it was close to $600. Also 53" tall, which IIRC is pushing it for my install (entrance to chimney is kind of low. Don't remember the exact height, nor do I feel motivated to go check.)
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
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home depot can order the tank you want, if you have the time.
easy to do when you plan replacement
versus emergency tanks leaking on christmas eve with house guests coming
the improved efficency over your old tank might pay for itself within a few years
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I keep hearing this, but the ones I see in stores only have a 50- something energy factor...
You're also discounting the small amount of joy that comes with being truly cheap and keeping something running well far past its "best before" date...
nate
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Certainly but just for more realistic info, most people don't generally replace a dip tube or anode rod during the life of a water heater. Flushing the bottom once in a while is probably the best thing you can do for it. Then of course we could get into the aspects of why an expansion tank is a good idea to install on a water heater and required in a lot of city codes (like mine). Then a pressure reducing valve on the home to bring any unneeded high city water pressure down to a more "friendly" 55 to 75 psi. Lower pressures use less water and extend the life of tanks, hoses and faucet cartridges. Bubba Bubba
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