Electric dryer for heat

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I used a toaster once. Friend of mine had run out of propane. I brought over space heater, and also pushed the toaster every time I walked by it.
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Christopher A. Young
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You'd ought to call your utility company, and ask the price per therm for electric versus whatever dead dino remains you presently burn. I suspect the dino juice is cheaper. But, please do make the call.
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To offset the price of oil, I plan to supplement my furnace with electric heat next winter. I am thinking of running the outlet from my dryer into the house (when not drying clothes). Would this be efficient?
---MIKE---

I did a comparison with fuel cost here in CT. Electric at 17 is still higher in price until oil exceeds $5.30 a gallon. Plug in the numbers here http://www.pelletheat.org/3/residential/compareFuel.cfm
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On Jun 19, 8:00 am, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (---MIKE---) wrote:

Kinda surprised about some of the responses here. For an electric dryer, there is NO carbon monoxide. None at all. Zero. There is no health risk I can envision by doing this.
The issue about expense of electric versus oil/gas depends on whether you are venting the air from a load of drying clothes into the house (in which case you get the heat for free -- you'd otherwise just be venting your heat outside). Of course, then you get the humidity as well, which may or may not be what you want. That would keep your skin from drying out in the winter, but would leaves puddle under your cool windows. I could see venting the dryer into the house during the last stages of the dry cycle, when most of the water is gone.
But I would not run this through your HVAC system. Last thing you need is condensation in the ductwork.
Just using a clothes dryer as a standalone heater blower seems expensive. In most places, per BTU produced, electricity is more expensive than oil/gas, as most people are pointing out. I mean, just turn on all the lights in your house. It'll do the same thing as your electric dryer, but warm all your rooms uniformly, instead of just the area around your dryer.
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(---MIKE---) wrote:

I'm surprised at some of the answers too. He said he it going to run it when there are no clothes in the dryer, just using it as a heater. Won't be any humidity from it that way.
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Yes, that was exactly my point. It is clear that one could save heating money by venting the dryer into the house while drying your clothes (which had not been noted). It is not clear (and, actually, pretty unlikely) that you would if just using it as a standalone heater without it drying clothes. Part of my point was that, to some degree, humid air could be advantageous.
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Doug Lassiter wrote:

Actually, I think somebody had made the point... :)
I've seen ads for venting filters to do precisely that offered on late night TV. I think one would require almost a HEPA filter to collect the finest of lint that would collect over time if did it often.
Agree totally that an electric clothes dryer is a sorry for a space heater--for one minor thing, they're usually not installed where one really wants/needs the output heat.
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You have to run the numbers with often electric resistance heating isn't out of the question compared to NG or oil. You have to run your own numbers.
The NG & oil have to be vented (with the exception of "ventless" NG or LPG heaters). From 5% to 25% of your fuel goes up the stack and the air that goes up is replaced by cold outside air.
Small electric heaters are quite cheap ($20-$30 or so). You can place them EXACTLY where you want the heat and seat the house thermostat to something like 60 ot 65F.
Venting the dryer inside during the winter might be OK if the excess humidity doesn't cause a problem. You might want to add an extra lint filter.
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