Electric cord and wiring questions...

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I have a swimming pool pump for the filter that is supposed to run 24 hours a day.
The pump can run in either 230V/7.5A or 115V/15A settings. The old owners of the house elected to run it 230/7.5A It's going to remain this way because the GFI breaker is for 230 and occupies two breaker spots. So is this double pole? The circuit itself is still only 15 amp.
My first question is why 230/7.5A instead of 115V/15A? If I do the calculations right both equal 1725 Watts so from a utility billing standpoint no diff? Any other reason to go 230?
Second question is the wire from the pump to the outlet is only 16 AWG. Seems a bit undersized? should this be a 12 awg? Is 16 awg acceptable for 7.5 amps 24 hours a day?
Third question is to turn motor off I have to unplug and replug. A real pain come weekly filter cleaning time. I'd like to wire a toggle switch in the pool shed but I can't find a switch that is rated for 230V/15A. All I see are 115/120/125V 15 or 20 amp switches. Maybe this is the switch I'm supposed to use for a 230V/15 amp http://www.homedepot.ca/product/2-pole-switch-15-amp-120-277v-white/905828
Thanks for the help!!!
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BTW I should add that this is a 2 wire plus ground wire from the main panel to the outlet. So a white, black and green. This mean there are two hot and no neutral on this circuit?
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wrote:

You are correct - as long as there is nothing requiring 110 volts, no neutral is required. The wires SHOULD be either both marked black, or one black and one red. Either taped or painted has been accepted for years - not sure exactly what CODE says today.
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@The Henchman:
That is correct...
The other posters here have explained why the installer chose to use the double pole 240v motor for that load...
You would find it difficult to locate a 2 pole switch in 15 amps as there are not many 15 amp circuits allowed in commercial buildings where such loads are more common...
I suggest using a 20 amp double pole switch...
Like this one:
http://www.homedepot.com/Electrical-Dimmers-Switches-Switches/h_d1/N-5yc1vZbojh/R-202027029/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053&superSkuId=202887054
In case you have trouble with the link:
- Leviton Model # R52-0CSB2-2WS - Internet # 202027029 - Store SKU # 705509 - Store SO SKU # 162677
~~ Evan
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Yes. Consider rewiring with white/black/red/green and keep the 230 V.
Joe
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Why should he do that? If there is no 120V load, there is no need for a neutral conductor, and no point in having one. What do you propose he connect it to, anyway?
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On Jul 12, 5:13pm, snipped-for-privacy@example.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Must be because Joe likes more colors.

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wrote in message wrote:

Must be because Joe likes more colors.

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No need for neutral. There is nothing that requires 120v like lights or control panel etc. It's for a motor only.
What's funny is I replaced that 230 V outlet last year to a nice brand new one that lacked rust and scorch marks. I don't recall the wire behind that box being red and black and bare.
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It's probably regular Romex which is black, white and bare.
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Bill is the same. Lower amps allows you to use smaller wire. Higher voltage helps with voltage drop on a long run.

12 gauge handles 20 amps. 14 guage handles 15 amps. I suspect 16 works for 10 amps.

That switch would work. Amps matter more than voltage for a switch.

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Pat wrote:

Hi, On 230V, PF would be little better resu;ting in improved efficiency.
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wrote:

OK - I'll see if I can help explain. At double the voltage a device uses half the current to produce the same power - This means you can get away with lighter wiring - and you have less "loss" over the same length of wire. Generally speaking you run motors at their highest rated voltage for best effiicency. By LAW you need a "disconnect" at the pump - the previous owner cheaped out and used a plug for a disconnect. The proper "switch" would be a 220 volt "disconnect" - which GENERALLY has a breaker in it that gets used as a switch. Older disconnects had a "knife switch" and had 2 fuses in them. The breaker currently used in the main panel, as well as the one that would be used in a "disconnect" are "double pole" breakers.
14 gauge wire is rated for a 15 amp load. 16 gauge is fine for 10 amps, so as long as the motor has built in overcurrent protection, 16 gauge wire is perfectly adequate for the 220 volt connection, but would be inadequate for 115 volts.
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On 7/11/2011 9:14 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The smallest wire most electricians will run to anything from a panel is 14 gauge. It's just a common practice with the majority of electricians running power. Low voltage is another story. All the control systems I've ever built had a minimum #14 bringing power in with #16 and smaller gauge used for wiring the guts of the system. My favorite safety switch or disconnect is the QO200TRCP manufactured by Square D. It looks like a QO circuit breaker but has no over current protection, it's just a big switch.
http://preview.tinyurl.com/5rlp4l2
TDD
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The smallest wire most electricians will run to anything from a panel is 14 gauge. It's just a common practice with the majority of electricians running power. Low voltage is another story. All the control systems I've ever built had a minimum #14 bringing power in with #16 and smaller gauge used for wiring the guts of the system.
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The wire from the panel to the outlet is 14 gauge. The wire from the outlet to the pump is 16 gauge.
I just bought a 725 watt dehumidifier that uses 18 gauge in it's cord. makes me wonder.
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On 7/12/2011 4:29 AM, The Henchman wrote:

The standard circuit breakers in the electrical panel are meant to protect the wire not the equipment. That's why the equipment has its own little fuse or circuit breaker. Your 725 watt dehumidifier only draws around 6.5 amps at he most so the 18 gauge wire is OK.
TDD
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wrote:

Less than 6.5 amps current draw - no problem. That's a roughly 50% load on a 14g wire - and for a 3 foot long cord it is not a problem.
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On Tue, 12 Jul 2011 01:44:52 -0500, The Daring Dufas

Understood about the premise wiring - but 16G Flexible cable (extention cord, appliance cord, etc) is VERY common - and as I said - adequate for the job at hand on 240 volts.
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On 7/14/2011 7:59 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

A motor like that, I would use #16 SO cord and a cord grip to keep it somewhat water tight.
TDD
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On Jul 11, 10:14pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

It's perfectly permissible to use a cord on a pool pump. Some installers do it so they can be removed for the winter. I agree I would personally install it hardwired, but it doesn't mean it was done with a plug to be cheap. I'd say the cheap and stupid part of the equation is that it was installed without a switch. I'd take a careful look at the rest of this install job, particularly that everything is properly grounded and bonded.

It's not an issue of older versus newer disconnects. You can go right down to HD and buy a disconnect that does not have a switch, only a pull out plug that cuts the power. They are very commonly used for AC condenser units, heat pumps. etc.
In this case, he could use a disconnect that includes a switch. But I'd back up a step. Why is this pool pump running 24/7? Drawing 7.5 amps, it sounds like a single speed 1hp motor. Typically such a pump is only run around 6 or 8 hours a day. By installing a timer box made for pools, he would get his switch and a timer to only run the pump as much as needed for filtering and save a lot of $$$.

.
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.
It's perfectly permissible to use a cord on a pool pump. Some installers do it so they can be removed for the winter. I agree I would personally install it hardwired, but it doesn't mean it was done with a plug to be cheap. I'd say the cheap and stupid part of the equation is that it was installed without a switch. I'd take a careful look at the rest of this install job, particularly that everything is properly grounded and bonded.
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OP Response: The motor has to be turned off to service the filter periodically, in my case once a week. Water cannot be flowing thru the filter when the filter valve is set to any of the cleaning or rinsing cycles. Essentially you use pool water to backfluch these filters. Water has to stop to allow the valve to be turned to a backflush setting.
---------------------------------------------

It's not an issue of older versus newer disconnects. You can go right down to HD and buy a disconnect that does not have a switch, only a pull out plug that cuts the power. They are very commonly used for AC condenser units, heat pumps. etc.
In this case, he could use a disconnect that includes a switch. But I'd back up a step. Why is this pool pump running 24/7? Drawing 7.5 amps, it sounds like a single speed 1hp motor. Typically such a pump is only run around 6 or 8 hours a day. By installing a timer box made for pools, he would get his switch and a timer to only run the pump as much as needed for filtering and save a lot of $$$.
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OP Response: Well the longer a pool filter/motor runs, the cleaner the pool water. It is the only way to circulate the pool water. In My case the pool is 16' x 32' x 10' deep. That's a lot of water. I run the pool motor/filtration usually between 6 pm and 6 am but ideally you would run it 24 hours a day especially if it's heavily used pool. I have a lot of trees around my pool and algae builds up easily for example. Right now my ideal is running the filter 12 hours a day (at 5.9 cents per KWhr) and it keeps things crystal clear.
The timer box and disconnect for pools and spas in my part of Canada are about $300. I don't mind using the plug the turn on turn off, however a switch would just be easier. For every filter cleaning it's turn on turn off 4 times.
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