Efficient priming technique for tongue and groove siding

I'm in the process of priming some 1X4 tongue and groove siding on all sides before installing it. I'm painting, not staining it (latex), so I don't imagine any kind of dipping scheme would work. The groove is about 1/4", so it really takes some scrubbing to get primer into the groove. Any suggestions for technique, etc. for being efficient in painting this material. A painter friend advises again spraying due to anticipated issues with drips clogging up the groove. Perhaps something other than a conventional brush? Perhaps priming the groove is not really necessary? FWIW, the material is pine.
Regards, Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's most important to prime where you can't see it. That's where you need the protection.
Paint the groove first - the rest is easy. Stand a number of pieces up on edge on some saw horses with the grooves facing up, and clamp them together so they stay standing up. Then paint the grooves, unclamp, lay the boards and paint as usual.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/9/2011 12:19 AM, RicodJour wrote:

Never having done that particular project, but having done quite a bit of painting, I'd also thin the primer up to the label max. That will help get it into the groove and sink around all the un-smooth wood grain. I think the best way to keep water out is to also be meticulous in putting on some paintable caulk. Boards vert or horiz?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks for the ideas; clamping sounds like a great idea. Should permit liberal use of paint without dripping on faces etc. Boards are to be installed horizontally.
Regards, Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Primer is pretty thin to start with. Adding more moisture will raise the grain of the wood with little to show for it.

You could also use a small bucket with a narrow spout to pour the primer into the groove. If one end were higher than the other the primer would run down and help distribute itself. You'd still have to brush the stuff in. And don't try to do to many boards at once. If you let the primer run between the clamped board and dry, you'll have added roughness on the visible faces, and that's much less fun to deal with. Eight boards at a time on a 3' wide sawhorse is about right. That'll let you lay them down flat and roll out the faces right after you do the groove.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It sounds to me like your painter friend doesn't know how to use a paint sprayer properly... If you are trying to cover some surface with a paint sprayer so it looks right in one coat, you don't know what you are doing and shouldn't be using a paint sprayer at all...
My opinion is that standing the boards so the grooves are exposed and then applying a couple of light coats with a paint sprayer would be less laborious than any other method of pre-priming all six sides of the T&G siding boards...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I would clamp them, put them on their sides, spay them and then take a brush and give it a quick brush.
If you do stand them up realize that the tounges don't bottom out in the groove so any paint that may settle in the grooves shouldn't be that big an issue unless there is a ton.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Paint manufacturers typically specify backrolling paint if it's sprayed on bare wood siding. Spray coats just fine, but it doesn't have the pressure to penetrate the pores that a brush or roller develops.
Spraying is definitely easier, but not always better.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You might want to test a few pieces to find whether or not the paint films build to the point the pieces don't fit easily. T
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hey Tom. Long time no see. What have you been up to?
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I wonder if staining would provide a good prime surface. never heard of anyone doing this just wondering?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There are different types of stain, but the two basic types used on decks, for instance, would probably either not seal the wood and bind the grain or not provide as strong of a long term bond coat for the paint to follow. Then there's also the possibility that the stain would bleed through the paint.
It might work, but I'm guessing it's an uphill battle for those reasons.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.