drywall tape

My neighbor just replaced three walls of drywall and somehow managed to float the mud so the job at first does'nt look so bad. I noticed what looked like pencil marks on the walls at the joints and have found he didn't tape the joints. Now what?? I think he is going to have to sand it down but he disagrees. Won't these cracks just get worse over time?
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Yep. You're right!
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TO LATE, and yes this will just become more obvious. Good thing its your neighbour and not "your Friend", "YOU"

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frank smith wrote:

That was stupid! Guess he could tape the cracks and feather in some mud then texture the walls. Or just tear it down and start over.
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Yep. As long as the walls are not yet painted, you still have another shot at it. Wet sand, or dry, the mud around the cracks until they are more exposed. Then start over and apply the tape and remud, feathering out on each side.
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frank smith wrote:

Any timber in the house will expand and contract with the seasons - so after one year, the cracks will probably be a lot worse.
Maybe your neighbour is prepared to live with this and learn from his mistake.
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frank smith wrote:

It's best to tape things up, but cracks can be filled with paintable caulking, too. You have prime first, so the caulk has something to stick to, then caulk, smooth the best you can before it dries, and paint.
If it's not done cracking, it might have to be done again in other places. Either way, he's probably learned his lesson.
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That's called a kludge, by some.
You can make a proper taped joint, or expect it to open up at some time.
They're never "done cracking" with annual house "biorythm" of internal relative humidity. If you go to Washington's mansion at Mt. Vernon, you'll see ~.75" gaps between floor boards in winter, which go to zero in summer. Same applies to framing, of course.
I've seen a few attempts to caulk such shoddy joints- wanna guess what happened to them in every case?
J
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snipped-for-privacy@sme-online.com wrote:

I'm sorry you've seen it done wrong, but done correctly, I've seen it fill a crack both indoors and outdoors without problems for years. Of course outdoors, it wasn't drywall. In both cases, priming before caulking is imperative to allow proper adhesion.
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snipped-for-privacy@sme-online.com wrote:

BTW, if you think the hairline cracks in the drywall seams will fluctuate between zero and .75", you're smoking something.
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Uh, yeah, that is ridiculous. Then again, so is sanding. It needs to be totally gouged out and redone.
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frank smith wrote:

Yep. Pretty weird that someone would just omit the tape entirely. If he's "done" with his spackling, and he thought he was ready to paint, then he's got another think coming. Tape is mandatory - the question is how to best approach it.
Four options: 1). Do nothing. You get to say I told you so and feel superior.
2). Apply tape directly on the "completed" work and do the whole thing over with three coats of compound. No need to sand. If the joint tape is bedded in compound, it will adhere just fine to the existing spackle. I've never seen spackle delaminate between coats yet, so it'll definitely stick as well as any other coat will. The tape and spackle on top of the existing spackling will have some buildup and would throw off corner squareness and affect moldings. Might be a big deal, might not.
3). Use a vinyl spackling and mesh crack control product such as Crack Kote. The fiberglass mesh is wider and flatter so two very thin coats of the vinyl spackling is all that will be needed to make an invisible repair. It eliminates the spackle buildup that would occur with option #2. I've never put Crack Kote on anything but a primed or painted surface so I can't say how it would stick to an unfinished joint compound surface. You may have to prime first. The vinyl compound doesn't sand, so if the guy relies heavily on sanding to get a smooth surface, this might not be the way to go.
R
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On Wed, 08 Feb 2006 11:47:25 -0800, frank smith <nospamforme

RIGHT !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Your neighbor didn't do that...... YOU DID IT !!!! Come on, fess up ......
You have 2 solutions to remedy this problem.
1. Tear down the house and start over. 2. Tear down the house and buy one already finished.
Mitty
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It's almost comforting to see some things never change. I haven't looked at this group for awhile, but there is the same ratio of idiots to the truly knowledgeable . What a shame when masturbation loses it's charm for morons like this Mitty .Let's all hope this guy get's a girlfreind and stays off this group for awile. It's really not that big a deal. In the amount of time it takes to listen to CarTalk and have a few beers the taping wil be fixed. Thanks to all the good guys that offered real advice.
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