Dryer breaker

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Just bought our first electric dryer , wewe have always used gas in the past . No natgas here , and propane would require installing a big tank . So what size brbreaker do I need in the panel to power this thing ? Current draw according to the model plate says it dawaws 22-24 amps , but there's also the start current surge - I'm not sure if the heating element comes on at power up . So will a 30A breaker handle this , or do I need to go with a 40 ? -- Snag
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On Tuesday, September 8, 2015 at 10:59:34 AM UTC-4, Terry Coombs wrote:

All the dryers and similar that I've dealt with, the installation instructions spec the ampacity requirement for the circuit, which would include the breaker and wiring. Given that the plate says 24, I would think 30 would be the correct size, assuming the wiring supports it.
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On 09/08/2015 10:07 AM, trader_4 wrote:

Yep.
30 amps is pretty much the standard
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philo wrote:

Thanks , I was leaning towards a 30A , but wasn't sure . The wiring will be new , the plan is to run 10/2 w/gnd , the run is about 25 feet or a bit more - unless she wants it somewhere other than where I plan to put it . The other likely location is right next to the power panel , a run of maybe 5-6 feet .
--
Snag



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The code in most places for a new dryer or stove requires 4 wires. Two hot wires, the neutral and a ground. Number 10 wire is correct for most instalations of a 30 amp breaker.
When you get the dryer , you will need a 4 wire plug to match the socket you are going to install.
Look at the dryer where the wires attach and see if there is a strap that goes from the neutral to the frame of the dryer. If it is there , be sure to remove it for the 4 wire cord instalation.
Years ago the dryers and stoves only used 3 wire plugs and the neutral and frame were hooked together, but that is not the correct (code) way to do it now.
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On Tue, 8 Sep 2015 12:23:21 -0400, "Ralph Mowery"

MOST driers come with the cord and plug attached these days - and it will be a 4 terminal plug.
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They may do it in some places. The ones I bought in the past did not .
I did a quick check of Lowes for the dryers I looked at the cord is extra. Usually a wa to get around $ 20 to $ 30 more out of the sell.
About 25 years ago I needed a new dryer and not the cord so I asked them to keep the cord and bring it to the house for free.
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It can also create a very dangerous shock hazard.
All new installs should be with 4 wire plug.
Mark
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On 09/08/2015 3:21 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

...
Which is why there's been a news story every night over it for the last 60+ years...oh, yeah, "not!"
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On Tuesday, September 8, 2015 at 4:54:08 PM UTC-4, dpb wrote:

+1
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On 9/8/2015 4:54 PM, dpb wrote:

Yah, putting in a proper 4-wire circuit is soooooooooooooo much more expensive.
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On 09/08/2015 6:30 PM, John wrote:

Immaterial; it the point is it gains virtually nothing in either safety or operation. Not that it isn't _marginally_ better, but there's a _long_ history that indicates it's a solution to an essentially non-existent problem.
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dpb wrote:

Marginally better is still better.
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wrote:

More than marginally. If you really feel that way, why run 23 wire to your receptacle outlets anywhere. Just tag the neutral.
The error in your ways will quickly become apparent when you are sitting on the garage floor with a metal cased tool in your hand. Any voltage drop in the neutral will be imposed on the tool's case.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com posted for all of us...

Some people just don't get it...
--
Tekkie

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On Friday, September 11, 2015 at 4:14:09 PM UTC-4, Tekkie® wrote:

I think there is agreement here that 4 wires for a dryer is a better method than 3 wire. The fact remains that 3 wire is still perfectly legal per NEC and per all the dryer manufacturer install instructions. And that despite 3 wire being in use for half a century, until ~2000, no one here can point to a single bad thing happening. We don't know how many incidents, if any or what the code change was actually based on. Presumably it;s not all that bad, because they addressed many other things in the code during that half century and only more recently arrived at requiring 4 wire for new circuits.
The remaining question is if you want to live with what is there, that's co de compliant and in widespread use or do something to marginally improve it. If you choose the latter, is it going to be a bastardized, non-compliant solution or one that is code compliant. If you choose the la tter, the two solutions I see are to:
1 - Run a whole new 4 wire circuit, change the cord to 4 wire, change the jumpering in the dryer..
2 - Change the cord to 4 wire, change the jumpering in the dryer, replace the receptacle with a 4 wire and install a separate ground wire from the receptacle that gets terminated pursuant to the code exception that GFRE cited. And that last part isn't likely to be easy because nearby grounding system points aren't likely to have the required 10g ground conductor.
You could also choose some level of bastardization within choice #2, eg hook the ground to a smaller than #10 grounding conductor, etc. I know what I would do which is to leave it connected as 3 wire, code compliant.
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On 9/11/2015 6:58 PM, trader_4 wrote:

What amazes me is the in the amount of time some people spend half-assing something when they could do the entire job properly with just a bit more effort.
Peace of mind is priceless.
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On Tue, 8 Sep 2015 13:21:39 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote in

Looks more like "complexity" just for the sake of complexity. The 3-wire installations work fine for 50 years. What suddenly made it dangerous?
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On 9/8/2015 7:57 PM, CRNG wrote:

Hint: 120 volt motor in dryer and loss of neutral at panel.
If you can't figure it out now, tear up your "man card" and NEVER do any electrical work again.
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If for some reason you loose the ground that is also used as the neutral connection from the dryer to the breaker panel your dryer frame will become 120 volts above ground. Touch it while grounded and you will find out.
.
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