Dryer 4 wire to 3 wire plug

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Just bought a used dryer much newer than the old one. Need to replace 4 prong plug with 3 prong. I know I will be replacing the whole wire at the dryer end. A site with pictures or advice from folks in the know?
TIA
Lou
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When you install the three wire cord set on the dryer, the center terminal needs to have a jumper installed from the terminal to the metal frame of the dryer. Once this is installed the center wire of the cord set goes on that terminal, and the outer wires of the set go to the adjacent terminals

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I'm sure other posters will correct me if I'm wrong, but if you have a plug that is closer (or at) current code, doesn't it make sense to replace the outdated receptacle instead of the "proper" cord?
JK
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That would make the most sense if he has a four wire feed to the current dryer outlet. If the feed is a round Romex type cable, it could be four wire. If it's an oval shaped gray plastic or cloth covered type SE cable, it's three wire
wrote:

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RBM wrote:

House was built in 1990. I assume it is only three wire.
Lou

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Big_Jake wrote:

I think it is not so simple since the 4 wire recpt needs proper grounding, but I am open to suggestions. Also may be easier to change the wire.
Lou
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no, it won't have the proper number of conductors in his cable.
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It is not that simple since the existing cable does not have four conductors. You may be able to replace the wire, but that may be a major project also if it is in the wall and not easily pulled. While the code allows using a jumper and three wires on the appliance, I don't think it allows using a four pin receptacle on a three conductor wire.
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No instructions? You have to add a jumper from the neutral to the ground and change the cordset, but it would be nice to know how the manufacturer intended it to be done.
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Toller wrote:

I did find this site which has comments: http://www.selfhelpforums.com/showthread.php?tB63
Lou
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I wouldn't disagree with anything there; though calling tens of millions of dryers and ovens an electrocution hazzard when I doubt anyone has ever been electrocuted is a bit of an overstatement. It could only happen if the neutral gets broken somehow and you touch the dryer with a wet hand when you are well grounded. And even then it is improbable; though certainly not impossible.
Can anyone document an actual fatality from a 3wire circuit?
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The advice above is correct. If you don't know the neutral from the other two hire a pro. It isn't worth dying over.
They come from the factory with a jumper from the neutral to the body of the dryer. This is removed when the dryer is installed using a 4 wire cable. Then the ground wire is attached to the body. If you are going back to 3 wires you reverse the process.
I just installed a new stove and this is the way it came.
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Look here for the pix. Too bad you have 10 comments about it from others and no pix.
http://fixitnow.com/appliantology/dryercords.htm
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Ralph Mowery wrote:

Thank You
Lou
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Lou wrote:

Well now that I visited the site given make that THANK YOU!!! Good info. And the associated http://fixitnow.com/2005/09/samurais-12-laws-of-appliance-repair.htm is a lot of fun, and gives sound advice.
Lou Education is about knowing where to look for answers.
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Some how something is not right ? why manufacture would use 4 prong plug on 120 ac unless is this unit 220/3/60 and is it commercial grade ???????????????????????????????????/ Tony

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nearly all full sized electric drtyers are 240 volt so they dry clothes in a reasonable length of time
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tony wrote:

All dryers are 208/220 for efficiency. You need the voltage to get the amps for the heat. 4 wire is safer than 3 wire but is same voltage.
Lou
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That is now the code. Two hots, neutral, ground. Used to be the 110V controls could use the ground as a neutral.
Note: It is not 120V, normal dryers use 220V There may be some small portable units that use 120V.
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wrote:

Note: the higher voltage is always twice the lower one, an in 110/220 or 120/240.
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