Drip edges along roof rakes

How important are they? One of my estimators said they really aren't very important along the full length of all rakes, but he will install them along the eaves.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 08/16/2012 06:48 PM, Rebel1 wrote:

Drip edge costs about $3 for a 10' piece and takes 20 seconds to install. What kind of a jack wagon hack would leave it off? Makes me wonder what other short-cuts he would take. I wouldn't hire that idiot.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/16/2012 5:48 PM, Rebel1 wrote:

<
http://www.epa.gov/iaplus01/technical/moisture/images/large/43a.jpg
Depends on whether the wind ever blows where you are... :)
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Don't let them bullshit you. The rake drip edge keeps the wind from blowing rain under the shingles. I wouldn't hire someone who tried to pull that one over on me. If they're cutting an important (and cheap) corner like that, what other crap are they going to pull?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, August 16, 2012 7:52:12 PM UTC-7, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

That's true only if the drip edge is applied over the shingles. I bet you can't find one roof with it applied that way. I did it that way on my first roof - looked like crap.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

can't find one roof with it applied that way. I did it that way on my first roof - looked like crap. No, the rake drip edge goes over the felt, under the shingles. Applying the drip edge over the shingles would look like crap.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Aug 16, 8:54pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Which is exactly what I said. And putting it over the felt and under the shingles does _NOT- keep the wind fromblowing rain under the shingles.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

can't find one roof with it applied that way. I did it that way on my first roof - looked like crap.

It keeps it from blowing under the shingles, getting to the decking.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rebel1 wrote the following on 8/16/2012 6:48 PM (ET):

They may be required by your local building code for all edges. Mine were in 1984.
--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

As Mike said. Considering the minimal cost for it why not put it on. It does add to the appearance of the house if it does nothing else.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Unless they use galvanized. I had a roof done once. I made sure the drip edge was in the contract but forgot to specify white aluminum. It looked like hell but I doubt anyone else really noticed. ;-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.