Drill's Clutch Torque Setting?

I just bought a new Panasonic cordless drill & driver (the EY6432) which has an adjustable Clutch Torque Setting. That's just about all the owner's manual tells me, that it's there. Can someone explain how I would utilize this adjustable clutch torque in a real-world setting? Thanks.
-Fleemo
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On Mon 10 Jan 2005 09:59:28p, tittered and giggled, and giggled and tittered, and finally blurted out...

I use the variable torque to prevent overdriving screws and stripping out the material they're driven into.
Wayne
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snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

Once you use it you will know. For example, you put a screw drive bit in and drive a screw down but it stops and just chirps before getting all the way down because the torque setting is too low. So, set the torque higher. Why not set it all the way high and leave it? Because driving a screw in your wood may be easy and you drive the screw in way too deep. Light job, low setting, tough jobs, high setting.
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There are no hard and fast rules. You set the clutch to drive the screw to the depth you need and not break the head or strip it. It varies with screw size, screw material, pilot hole size, wood type, etc. You'll quickly find out with a little trial and error.
I bought a Panasonic drill last year. Nice tool.
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Other than the clutch adjustment as noted by everyone above, you could use the drill as a super manual screw driver - the clutch lock is a such a useful feature that no other drill has.
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This is a setting that quits turning a thingus before it either strips out or breaks. You can do two things. Set it full on, and back off until it quits stripping or breaking the thinguses. I prefer to set it lower, then increase it until it drives the fastener as tight and to the depth I want it. As you learn the tool, you will remember the different settings for different things. Remember, start low, and come up on the settings.
Steve
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<< Can someone explain how I would utilize this adjustable clutch torque in a real-world setting? >>
Usual trick is to start the job at a very low setting, check results (screw head too high, e.g.), then raise setting by degrees until the torque setting is just right. Do it every time and it gets to be a useful habit to keep you out of trouble. HTH
Joe
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Ahh, makes sense to me now. Thank you all for your input. I do appreciate it. :)
-Fleemo
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Ahh, you're a smart guy. You would have figgered it out, you just wouda stripped and twisted off a few more screws. You will still do this. Just listen for when it starts creaking or chattering. That's usually when they go "bink".
Steve
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Thanks for the reminder, Steve. Don't use cheap screws. Don't use drywall screws when you should be using wood screws or they will go "bink" quickly. I also like the square drive screws too.
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