dress anchor threads with ? to fasten flange to concrete floor

I'm replacing an older toilet with a Kohler Wellworth 4276-0. Problem with old one was roots in the line (see other thread for details). So the toilet wasn't bad, just old. If I went to the trouble to [learn how to] remove it, I figured now would be the time to put in a new, efficient one at the same time. At the hardware store, I asked for best value, including ease of installation.
In the process of installing the new one, wouldn't you know it, I find I am ignorant about lots of things. For instance, the flange, which attached to the black plastic sewer outlet (probably not the right name for that piece of plumbing) looked pretty badly corroded. Being covered in a half-melted wax seal made it look worse than it really was. After clearing the seal away, some bizarre fig tree roots, brushing it with old tooth brush and vacuuming, it looks alot better. It appears also to be attached around the black plastic "neck", and it is fastened to the concrete floor with anchors. Can't see much of those.
After the clean up, I masked the plastic (rubber?) neck and the vinyl floor (vinyl over concrete), bought some Loctite Extend Rust Neutralizer and applied 3 coats of that. Next, on the advice of the guys at the hardware store, I bought a new flange, gave it a couple coats of Extend, temporarily fastened it on top of the original flange with a pair of 5/16" x 2.25" brass T bolts (flange is iron/steel and bolt is brass - won't dissimilar metals corrode where they touch?) so I can drill up tp 6 holes to start some Tapcon (1/4" x 2.25") concrete anchors. Hardware guys recommended I use a Bosch hammer drill bit (3/16" diameter, 6" end to end). I have an old Portalign tool atached to my drill that should let me drill good perpendicular holes thru the tabs on the new flange.
The burning questions of the hour are: 1 should I use 6 anchors or is that way overkill? 2 how deep to make the holes? 3 does the hammer drill bit need special lubricant/cooling? It says its good for a hundred holes but how deep?
I saw one reference on the web, newsgroup I think, where the writer said they had used Loctite cement on their anchor theads. What exactly would (should) that be? I suppose one would dress the threads with this stuff and then drive them into the holes. Is that correct? Will a manual screwdriver and a average strength healthy male have sufficient umph to properly seat those anchors?
After I anchor the flanges, I will mount the new seal on the new toilet, mount the (base of) the toilet to the flange, putty/caulk, level and shim as needed. Then mount the tank and hook up to the water supply. Before that I'll be replacing that resupply valve too as the old one is very rusted. I expect silicon tape, the thick stuff. is best the threads on that valve but maybe I've got that wrong?
Advice on the putty/caulking would also be appreciated. Is one better than the other? I have both GE Kitchen & Bath 100% Silicone Sealant caulk and Oatey Plumber's putty. Hardware guys advised me not to putty/caulk all the way around the base. Leave an opening so if there is a water leak / bad seal, I will find out quickly.
Have I left anything out?
Any/all advice is very much welcome. Bob
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If the old closet flange was in good shape and tight to the floor you don't need to do anything to it, and should'nt. Buy some new closet bolts and a new wax gasket and mount the new water closet. Adding a second closet flange on top of the old one is only going to cause major problems. Soften the new wax gasket a bit unless it's already at room temperature. About 20 seconds in a microwave will make them workable but be careful with that, you don't want to melt it. An extra pair of hands and eyes can help in getting it properly aligned. You may wish you'd kept the old one though, the new ones don't always flush as well.
Dan
On 9 Nov 2004 18:22:19 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@cox.net (Bob Cooper) wrote:

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Hmmm. At the moment I'm stuck on the supply valve. It was swaged on the copper pipe and the wife wanted it replaced and I agreed as it was greatly limed and corroded. I knew those swage joints were tricky and this one was no exception. Plumber friend suggested I crack the nut and try to remove the swage with a pair of pliers. I left the nut and swage and tried fastening a new supply valve to the old nut. It leaks - like a pint a minute. Seems to be squirting between the swage and the copper line and out the back. What are my options now?
I've already drilled 6 holes to hold the Tapcon anchors (depth same as length of anchor). . .
Thanks for the reply Dan.
(Bob Cooper) wrote:

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If the wax ring is at room temp, simply press the wax flat side down on the spud, and push it on, with a twisting motion. Then peel off the plastic that the ring is molded in. This will secure the ring in place when you flip the toilet over, and place it. No mess, no fuss.
Taught to me by a long time maintenance guy.
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