drain plug removal (cast iron)

I've got some kind of a cleanout plug on the 4" cast iron street drain. This likely hasn't been open in 80 years.
I'm anticipating trouble. Any hints? PB Blaster a waste of time?
I figure that I'll need to some Scotch to get through this.
Jeff
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Jeff Thies wrote:

a) I'd get the torch out and try heat
b) IMO, yes...
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wrote:

Any good reason to remove it? That's the first question I'd ask myself. You might rap it a bit with hammer. The dope is probably hard. Just be wary of cracking the cast iron. Same when you put a wrench on it, be aware of force put on the pipe and other joints. Get an opposing wrench on the fitting itself. If the plug doesn't move rap it some more. Have a new plug ready, dope, and a wire brush to clean the fitting threads.
Disclaimer: I am not a professional plumber. I take no responsibility for damage incurred by listening to anything I say.
--Vic
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On Tue, 04 Jan 2011 14:22:02 -0600, Vic Smith

The plug - only the plug!

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Why are you removing it. I had a clog that needed rodding, the plumber gave up after a torch and wrench failed loosen the plug and cut out the section. I have a floor drain with a plug in it my boiler guy with a welders torch and a big wrench could not move.
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I had to cut mine out with a reciprocating saw. I managed to cut out a small section which freed it up enough to want to spin .
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On 1/4/2011 2:04 PM, Jeff Thies wrote:

Break it out, replace with a plastic one.
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Steve Barker
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Waste of time to fool with unscrewing it. Drill a couple of holes (or more) in the thinner part and beak it out. Plastic or brass is a good replacement.
Joe
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If this is a brass plug, it is very thin. Our plumbers normally just plan on breaking out the brass plug, do the work, replace with a new brass plug. I asked them about dosing well with anti seize compound for next time - nah, we'll just break out the next one.
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Large hole saw. Then cut the remaining piece out to the threads in 3 or 4 directions with a sawsall. Use a chisel to knock the pieces loose. Replace with plastic and some dope. Just snug it down. It ain't got to be wrenched in.
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Just f don't let the pieces fall into the drain.
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On 1/4/2011 3:04 PM, Jeff Thies wrote:

It's 4" iron pipe inside the flange of another pipe. About an inch sticking out. I thought I would just put a fernco cap on but it's not really enough to put the cap enough.
Are those brass plugs still available and how do you put them in. I was at the Borg, so no help there! At least I didn't recognize them. Does that screw in?
Also, got a small hole in the top of a pipe. How to patch? I would think tar would be involved...
Jeff
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