Does vinegar harm cement paving bricks?

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Same in Dutch: Azijn is vinegar Azijnzuur is acetic acid Mier is ant Mierezuur is formic acid
But the real point is that vinegar or dilute acetic acid solutions are mild, but pure concentrated acetic acid is an aggressive acid, though not an oxidant like sulfuric or nitric acids.
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Han
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Han wrote:

Yes but for attacking cement, I don't know for sure. I do know that muriatic acid (hydrochloric acid) will attack cement and that no oxidation is involved. Me, I would not use vinegar on cement to be on the safe side. OP could run test and take a chip of brick and let sit in vinegar.
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Brick is far from concrete. I don't think you can compare that. Concrete is made with portland cement which is basic. Seems to me (but I'm not really sure) that concrete would be slowly attacked by acid. Muriatic acid is diluted hydrochloric acid (not concentrated, but I would not drink it , while vinegar should be almost safe to drink - think pickles). I think that muriatic acid etches concrete and cleans it for instance for a repair, ensuring new concrete adheres properly.
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Han wrote:

Safety Hint: Don't drink the pickle juice until all the pickles are gone or, if you do, wear goggles.
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Han wrote:

OP said "cement paving brick". If it's same stuff I have in part of a retaining wall and fireplace in family room, it's concrete cast in individual brick form. In my case, these are white bricks and impossible to get clean of fireplace soot.
Many years ago, I used muriatic acid for cleaning and etching basement floor for painting. I'm sure a swabbing would just be neutralized and this would hold for vinegar but a lot of acid would probably be corrosive.
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replying to Frank, Fattio wrote: This exchange is fascinating
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I'm fairly sure vinegar contains acetic acid. Which may very well react wtih the paving.
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On Sat, 25 Apr 2009 11:47:37 -0700, G Mulcaster

I use vinegar to clean hard water stains off of cement block walls. We have hard water -- calcium leaches into the block. It is mild, and after a short soak and scrub I rinse it off. A power washer would cause more damage.
["Its easy to see why vinegar has been around for thousands of yearsit has 1001 uses! From cooking and cleaning with vinegar, to gardening and home remedies, white distilled vinegar is one of the most versatileand economicalproducts you can have on hand."]
http://www.vinegartips.com /
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Thanks for the useful link!
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All the chemists aside, I doubt the vinegar, used occasionally in this manner, would be any more damaging than the normal pollutants in the air or rain. If it's worked for 3 years with no noticeable impact you are probably safe to continue.

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Possibly safe, but if used too often, accumulating acid may (I said may) eventually cause harm to vegetation or concrete. YMMV <snicker>
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On Sat, 25 Apr 2009 11:47:37 -0700, G Mulcaster

Probably, but maybe to an extent you would not notice. Vinegar on limestone makes it bubble carbon dioxide.
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G Mulcaster wrote:

Being acidic, it *does* attack them; however, weak as it is, it would take many, many applications to notice anything.
You can kill the moss with a dilute solution of chlorox, don't know if it does weeds too. Salt - table or rock - should do the weeds and keep them out for a while once it is watered in, maybe moss too. And as a last resort, there is always Round-Up :)
dadiOH
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wrote:

Why is Roundup a "last resort"? It's very safe stuff, and quickly breaks down harmlessly after doing it's job. It's even approved for use with food crops. The only caution on the most concentrated version is that it is an eye irritant. Apparently it's safe to drink right out of the bottle, as there are no cautions whatsoever against it.
Safer than Clorox.
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Think "tongue in cheek".
dadiOH
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wrote:

Salt or Chlorox are more hazardous than RoundUp. Salt is probably the worse chemical to use if you are trying to protect nearby plants. Put a layer of lime over moss to control it.
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"G Mulcaster" wrote:

You are using the wrong chemicals. Use glyphosphate for the weeds and a zinc formula for the moss; both are available as a concentrate to be mixed with water and applied in accordance with the instructions. Both are safe if used appropriately.
Trying to use folksy home remedies is going to cause more problems in the long run than just using the proper, modern solution the first time.
Jon
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wrote:

Also he could probably need some lime added to his yard. Sounds like it may be acidic and the vinegar is just making it worse in the long run. Yards in southern states are rarely too alkiline. When I moved into my current home I had a soil test done to see how much lime I needed. It was so acidic I had to spread a truck load on it , wait a year then check again to see how much more I would need.
Jimmie
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On Sat, 25 Apr 2009 11:47:37 -0700, G Mulcaster

Thanks to everyone for your responses. On balance, it would appear that vinegar is not the solution to use.
Time to come up with a plan "B".
Regards, Gary
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Vinegar wont hurt anything, it evaporates to quickly and changes from acid to neutral its interaction, even Muriatic evaporates and looses its efectivness fast, it doesnt have the time necessary to do anything but clean the top layer. In stone cleaniing after 5 minutes with muriatic I find its done its job its deactivated mostly so you wash it off
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